Physcal Disk(s)

Greetings all,

this is a two parts post,
1- How to display all Physical Disk(s) with their partitions including Windows Partitions in openSUSE linux?

2- pvs command, runs and shows results only once, on the second run it displays nothing. is it s bug? or it there is some other reason?

Thanks

Jamil


# fdisk -l

That might not do what you want if you have GPT partitioned disks, depending on the “fdisk” version. I’m currently running factory, and the “fdisk” there does pretty well with GPT partitioning.

Or:


# parted -l

2- pvs command, runs and shows results only once, on the second run it displays nothing. is it s bug? or it there is some other reason?

I am not having this problem. Again, I’m running factory. So perhaps this is a bug that is fixed for factory.

thanks for the reply,

none of theses two commands show Windows partitions (NTFS / FATxx)

fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 161.1 GB, 161061273600 bytes, 314572800 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk label type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x000d4233

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 2048 4208639 2103296 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda2 * 4208640 46153727 20972544 83 Linux
/dev/sda3 46153728 314572799 134209536 83 Linux

parted -l

Model: VMware, VMware Virtual S (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 161GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags
1 1049kB 2155MB 2154MB primary linux-swap(v1) type=82
2 2155MB 23.6GB 21.5GB primary ext4 boot, type=83
3 23.6GB 161GB 137GB primary ext4 type=83

thanks again

So you are running openSUSE in VMware, and want to see your (Windows) host’s partitions?
That is not possible I’m afraid. (at least I wouldn’t know how)
One of the points of a VM is to encapsulate the system inside and completely separate it from the host.

Regarding pvs: I can reproduce here what you describe.
“pvs -a” should still work though (it does here).
Anyway, I see no point in using pvs when you do not have an LVM…

On 2014-09-28 17:56, jamilsaif wrote:
>
> thanks for the reply,
>
> none of theses two commands show Windows partitions (NTFS / FATxx)
>
>
> FDISK -L

They do here. And it is lower case.

> PARTED -L
> Model: VMware, VMware Virtual S (scsi)

Wait. Is that a virtual Linux guest, inside a Windows host?
In that case, it will display NOTHING from the Host.

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Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

if not possible, then it is impossible to access the Windows partitions !!! which is not the case as long as there are many articles describes how to mount Windows Partition into linux.

and then, I used to access it but using Fedora linux

Thanks again

Of course it is possible to see/mount Windows partitions in Linux.

But again, if you run an OS inside VMware, it only sees its virtual hard disk, and not the real one of your PC.

so, if I can mount the windows partition, why can I see it?
same setup was VMWare / Fedora and it was successful … is it a limitation in openSUSE?

You can map physical drives to VMware but this is extremely dangerous and completely voids the idea of an isolated virtualized environment.

If you want to exchange files between the VM and the host you should use Shared Folders (hgfs) and/or CIFS.

Because you are running inside a VM.
Please read again what I wrote.
I don’t want to repeat the same again and again.

same setup was VMWare / Fedora and it was successful … is it a limitation in openSUSE?

No, this is no limitation in openSUSE.
This is a limitation (on purpose) of VMware.
If you would install openSUSE on your real hardware, you would see the Windows partitions and could mount them.

I do not know how your setup looked like with Fedora, but a guest definitely can not see the host’s disk.
As Miuku indicated, it is possible to add a physical harddisk to a host, but that’s dangerous.

Better use shared folders if you want to access your windows host’s files. That’s what they are here for.

You could use Samba to share partitions over the notwork. But that is not the same as “mounting”. You would setup a network connection and you can then share folders just like any other network connection.

it was not my intention to share or access, it was originally how to display the Physical Disk(c) with Partition including Windows (NTFS/FATxx) Partition s

As said above can’t be done. A VM is a “Virtual Machine” ie like a second computer just virtual. So you can not directly interact between a host and a virtual machine. This is not a limitation on the host or guest OS’s but a limitation imposed by the virtualization process and software. If you run Windows guest in a Windows Host the guest can not see the host.

This isn’t completely true - VMware can map physical disks directly and can use pass-through for PCI/E devices.

However as I and Wolfi pointed out, that can be extremely dangerous as it can lead to catastrophic data loss and cause system instability and should not be done unless you have completely understanding of what you are doing.

On 2014-09-28 18:46, jamilsaif wrote:
>
> if not possible, then it is impossible to access the Windows partitions
> !!! which is not the case as long as there are many articles describes
> how to mount Windows Partition into linux.

It is possible if you installed as a double boot system. We do it every day.

As you installed INSIDE VMware virtualization, it is impossible
(intentionally impossible).


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

On 2014-09-28 21:36, Miuku wrote:
>
> gogalthorp;2666960 Wrote:
>> As said above can’t be done. So you can not directly interact between a
>> host and a virtual machine.

> This isn’t completely true - VMware can map physical disks directly and
> can use pass-through for PCI/E devices.
>
> However as I and Wolfi pointed out, that can be extremely dangerous as
> it can lead to catastrophic data loss and cause system instability and
> should not be done unless you have completely understanding of what you
> are doing.

Exactly. It needs that you really understand what you are doing, and the
OP does not.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)