PartitionMagic trouble, cant boot XP before dual-boot suse install

Im in the process of creating a dual-boot with XP. So far I have a live usb created, and have defraged and partitioned the C: drive in XP.

I used partitionmagic to split the c drive- resized the c: partition down, and created one new partition to install linux. PartitionMagic did it’s thing, and at the end of the process gave me an error saying that it was unable to assign a drive letter to one or more partitions and said to restart the machine. I hit the restart button in the software, and got a BSOD. (forgot to write down the error… >:()

Now, when trying to boot back into xp, it will not boot past the blue winXP screen, just before the login. This happens in safe mode, last good config, etc.

So, I booted opensuse using the live usb, successfully. There, I opened gparted. A warning flag is shown on sdb1. The warning shows multiple “Cluster accounting failed at…: missing cluster in $Bitmap” messages. Below that is the following:
“Filesystem check failed! Totally 539 cluster accounting mismatches.
ERROR: NTFS is inconsistent. Run chkdsk /f on Windows then reboot it TWICE!
The usage of the /f parameter is very IMPORTANT! No modification will be made to NTFS by this software until it gets repaired.”

I thought it wise to get this sorted out before doing the linux install on my new partition. So, how can I run chkdsk like it asks without accessing Windows? I bought the laptop used, so no XP boot disc… Can I fix this in opensuse with the live usb?

Thanks in advance!!!

On 2013-11-10 16:06, ShamrockTux wrote:

> I thought it wise to get this sorted out before doing the linux install
> on my new partition. So, how can I run chkdsk like it asks without
> accessing Windows?

You can not.

> I bought the laptop used, so no XP boot disc… Can I
> fix this in opensuse with the live usb?

Not from Linux, no. You need another Windows. I know some proprietary
software that is good at repairing Windows disks, but it also needs
Windows. In Linux there is PhotoRec and TestDisk that might do something
(the second one). Maybe the XFCE rescue image got it, I can check later.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

Normally, it is best to allow Windows to fix its own NTFS hard disk partitions. That means booting into Windows and giving the check disk command at the DOS prompt. That will normally force a fix of any disk errors at which time you can install openSUSE if the fix worked. openSUSE does not install to NTFS partitions and it is best to provide the openSUSE installer blank hard drive space, free of anything.

Thank You,

On 2013-11-10 17:06, jdmcdaniel3 wrote:

>
> Normally, it is best to allow Windows to fix its own NTFS hard disk
> partitions. That means booting into Windows and giving the check disk
> command at the DOS prompt.

Which is not possible because it does not boot; and it does not boot
because it needs a good filesystem check. Impossible situation.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)

If you no longer have or never had the Windows installation disk then you are up a creek with no paddle with no good fix. The install disk does include the required disk fixing commands. As always, if you don’t understand what you are doing it best to seek good advice before you start and not after.

Thank You,

Point taken.

On that note, I have located a downloadable xp boot disc. Since I apparently know just enough to f things up, should it be self explanatory to run chkdsk from the new boot disc? Any tips would be much appreciated!

I am not the repair expert, but its something you can find this searching online: How to Repair Windows XP Using the Windows XP CD - PCWiki

Thank You,

Then I assume it is this one Free NTFS Bootdisk, NTFS4DOS, NTFS Boot CD as that seems to be the only one that claim to handle the crossing between MSDOS/FAT and NTFS. Beware, though, that as time goes by, later OSes (after XP) implement more new features to NTFS than was available when NTFS4DOS was developed, and executing “CHKDSK /f” under that for newer systems my be just as destructive as any delete or format command… I am unaware of XP having implemented any such new features though, but they may have done so without me detecting it.

Additioon:
I stopped using Partition Manager years ago (don’t remember which version). Its licensing just crossed the border from being sensible to be outright greedy by several miles. I also found that it was trying too much to do its magic on things it really didn’t understand.

More than once it rendered my disk in a - well - magic state that I couldn’t recover from apart from rolling in the backup. I found I had to keep the manual close by and to make sure the requirements were met by manual approach - they wouldn’t do it automatically. To me, it looks like you’ve stumbled into a similar situation. AccordIng to Wikipedia (PartitionMagic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia), it hasn’t been developed since 2003 - which is about the time I bought my license.

Having said that, even CHKDSK has limited features for fixing disks under Windows. You should rely on scandisk instead, but for that you would need a bootable Windows CD.

Not to worry, however: I find that tools like gparted does the job just as well, because, as you’ve found out the hard way:
Partition Magic doesn’t offer anything extra for NTFS anyway - you need chkdsk/scandisk to do useful fixes, but my copy of gparted (=version 0.16.2, included with openSUSE 13.1RC2) DOES INCLUDE CHECK/REPAIR OF NTFS SYSTEMS! I ran it on my Win8.0 partition just now. I cannot say whether problems would be reliably fixed - or to which extent, though, as no problems were detected.

Resulting output:


GParted 0.16.2

 Libparted 2.4

 | **Check and repair file system (ntfs) on /dev/sda4**  00:00:08    ( SUCCESS ) |
|---|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] calibrate /dev/sda4  00:00:00    ( SUCCESS )|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] *path: /dev/sda4
start: 2893824
end: 1051469823
size: 1048576000 (500.00 GiB)*|


[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
 | check file system on /dev/sda4 for errors and (if possible) fix them  00:00:08    ( SUCCESS )|
|---|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] ***ntfsresize -i -f -v /dev/sda4***|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] *ntfsresize v2013.1.13 (libntfs-3g)
Device name        : /dev/sda4
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size       : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 536870908416 bytes (536871 MB)
Current device size: 536870912000 bytes (536871 MB)
Checking for bad sectors ...
Checking filesystem consistency ...
100.00 percent completed
Accounting clusters ...
Space in use       : 172166 MB (32.1%)
Collecting resizing constraints ...
Estimating smallest shrunken size supported ...
File feature         Last used at      By inode
$MFT               :     32219 MB             0
Multi-Record       :    182827 MB         86651
$MFTMirr           :         1 MB             1
Compressed         :     36027 MB        116676
Sparse             :     78067 MB            35
Ordinary           :    178259 MB         24636
You might resize at 172165255168 bytes or 172166 MB (freeing 364705 MB).
Please make a test run using both the -n and -s options before real resizing!
*|


 ||
|---|


[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
 | grow file system to fill the partition  00:00:00    ( SUCCESS )|
|---|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] run simulation  00:00:00    ( SUCCESS )|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] ***ntfsresize --force --force --no-action /dev/sda4***|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] *ntfsresize v2013.1.13 (libntfs-3g)
Device name        : /dev/sda4
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size       : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 536870908416 bytes (536871 MB)
Current device size: 536870912000 bytes (536871 MB)
New volume size    : 536870908416 bytes (536871 MB)
Nothing to do: NTFS volume size is already OK.
*|


 ||
|---|


[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
 | real resize  00:00:00    ( SUCCESS )|
|---|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] ***ntfsresize --force --force /dev/sda4***|
|| [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] *ntfsresize v2013.1.13 (libntfs-3g)
Device name        : /dev/sda4
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size       : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 536870908416 bytes (536871 MB)
Current device size: 536870912000 bytes (536871 MB)
New volume size    : 536870908416 bytes (536871 MB)
Nothing to do: NTFS volume size is already OK.
*|


 ||
|---|


[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[/TD]
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 ========================================


Let us know how things progress!

dayfinger

On 2013-11-11 21:06, dayfinger wrote:

> Additioon:
> I stopped using Partition Manager years ago (don’t remember which
> version). Its licensing just crossed the border from being sensible to
> be outright greedy by several miles. I also found that it was trying too
> much to do its magic on things it really didn’t understand.

I used it once, with a colleague, the first time I installed Linux, in
1998. It worked. But later I read that PM had different ideas than Linux
about partitions, and I was alarmed. I never used it again (and anyway
it wasn’t mine).


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.3 x86_64 “Dartmouth” at Telcontar)