partition-table: does this one make sense for a fresh install of os 12.3

hello dear Linux-friends

i currently am preparing the the systemchange (opgrade ) **from opensuse version 12.2 to 12.3 **

all the important thing´s i want to save is

  • thunderbird - with enigmail and the corresponding gnupgp passwords and credentials

all the other things( data etx etc) was stored and saved.
But the rearrange and new setup of the above mentioned thunderbird does make me a bit frightened - it was very very tricky process to deal with all those enigmail-things and the setup of kpgp
it took me several weeks.

So - if i had to choose between a fresh (vanilla ) install - on a “nacked” laptop - with no home-partiion or something ohter old stuff - i would prefer this way - (if i were able to quickliy re-build the tbird with enigmail)

if i intend to do such a installation - i should / could rework the old partinion table - or what do you think !? Does this currently used partion make sense !?

How would you arrange the installation.
**
Note **- i do not need any other system on the lappy - years ago - i thougtht that i need some place for another operating system. These times are passed - i only want to stick to openSuse.
:wink:

So i look forward to your ideas regarding the partition table: Look forward to hear from you

greetings

http://www.schulcenter.org/image_uploads/partitionstabelle_medion_lappy.jpg

What’s wrong with keeping it like it is? Your user configs are in /home, you have a copy of /etc¸ IMHO that should be all you need.

Do you have your /home/.hidden_files backed up? That is where thunderbird stores all your email stuff. If I were you I would let openSUSE take over the whole drive with its default schema. I believe it will make three partitions >> / , /home and /swap partition and that is it.

I agree with anika200. Why keep 14 partitions (plus unallocated space) if you are effectively only using 3 partions? Seems like a waste of space to me.

Only, this may be exactly the “default” proposal of the openSUSE installer if you do a “fresh” install without formatting the whole disk. It seems to try and keep the partitions it finds adding its own new partitions. I have done quite a number of such “update-installs” and always had to edit the partition-table after having found many more partions in the proposal than expected.
BTW, I still keep the habit of having a separate partition for /var and /tmp. What about that? Out of fashion with lots of disk space avialable?

On 2013-05-24 23:26, kasi042 wrote:
>
> I agree with anika200. Why keep 14 partitions (plus unallocated space)
> if you are effectively only using 3 partions? Seems like a waste of
> space to me.

Same here.

Seeing so many partitions, perhaps it is time to reformat the entire drive.

Thunderbird emails are stored under “~/.thunderbird/”, and PGP keys
under “~/.gnupg/”. If they are important (they would be to me) make a
backup of those directories on different media (not FAT).

> anika200;2559861 Wrote:

>> …If I were you I would let openSUSE take over the whole drive with its
>> default schema…

> Only, this may be exactly the “default” proposal of the openSUSE
> installer if you do a “fresh” install without formatting the whole disk.
> It seems to try and keep the partitions it finds adding its own new
> partitions. I have done quite a number of such “update-installs” and
> always had to edit the partition-table after having found many more
> partions in the proposal than expected.

You can tell the installer to read the previous installation fstab, and
then it will reuse that setup.

> BTW, I still keep the habit of having a separate partition for /var and
> /tmp. What about that? Out of fashion with lots of disk space avialable?

I also use several partitions for different things, in my desktop, but
not in my laptop, because the hard disk is smaller.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

I always thought separate partitions e.g. for /tmp of /var were originated in the lack of disk space thus preventing a system from becoming blocked by excessive logs or temp files?

On 2013-05-25 00:26, kasi042 wrote:
>
> robin_listas Wrote:
>> I also use several partitions for different things, in my desktop, but
>> not in my laptop, because the hard disk is smaller.

> I always thought separate partitions e.g. for /tmp of /var were
> originated in the lack of disk space thus preventing a system from
> becoming blocked by excessive logs or temp files?

It certainly prevents that a runaway process fills the entire disk, that
was one reason. Another is to use different mount options, or even
different filesystem types. Another is to use different hard disks,
which was necessary because disks were small, but also allows
parallelization of i/o.

On the other hand, fragmenting a single disk in several dedicated
partitions, each with an adequate empty space, wastes the available
space. A single partition shares that empty space amongst all.

Thus, in my laptop I use one for Linux root, another for home, swap, and
a small 8GB one for testing the next release, IIRC.

Ah, I forget one curious reason: you needed the kernel to reside before
a certain point on big disks, because the bios call used to load it
could not read beyond that point (any bootloader, like lilo or grub, has
to use bios calls at some point, there is no kernel yet). The solution
was to place a small /boot partition at the start of the disk. This was
possible even if Windows was there, because you only needed about 50MB
for that partition, you could shrink windows that much :slight_smile:

Nowdays, some people use a separate /boot when the main system is
encrypted or in lvm or some types of raid.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

Hi Carlos,

Thanks for the very detailed reply. One never stops learning.

:slight_smile:

kasi