openSUSE Web master: a problem with a key file for the software package clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm

On August 17th or 18th or the year 2011 I downloaded the software package clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm from Main Page - openSUSE on the Internet, “Site map,” in an edit control beside “Download packages” entering “clicfs” and searching for it, and finally clicking on the hyperlink for clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm to download that package to my computer. Then to install that package in openSUSE-11.4 Linux as a superuser or root user in the “/” directory I typed “rpm -i clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm”. I received the message “warning: clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm: Header V3 DSA/SHA1” (Digital Signature Algorithm/Secure Hash Algorithm 1) “Signature, key ID” (IDentification) “67b8ac90: NOKEY.” I searched the following key servers for the key ID 67b8ac90: MIT PGP Key Server, PGP Public Key Server, and Public Key Server Commands (The key server Welcome to Keyserver: Welcome was unavailable for searching for key IDs on both August 18, 2011 and August 27, 2011 due to a notice of maintenance for that key server site.). But that key ID was not found at any of those three key servers. At MIT PGP Key Server I discovered that the system used in such key IDs was to remove the space between the last two groups of four characters in the fingerprint of the key and then to form the key ID as the union of those latter two groups of four characters.

I found the downloaded file at http://opensuse.mirror.netriplex.com/repositories/server:/ltsp/openSUSE_11.4/i586/clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm on the Internet. In the first parent directory above that Web page I found the folder repodata and in it the hyperlink repomd.xml.asc. After clicking on that hyperlink, inside that corresponding file I think I saw “PGP Signature” (Pretty Good Privacy Signature), “GnuPG v1.07 (GNU/Linux)” (Gnu Privacy Guard version 1.07), and the date “06-Aug-2011.” Also in the same parent directory I found a hyperlink for repomd.xml.key. After clicking on that hyperlink in my Mozilla, Firefox-5.0 Web browser there was an error displaying that file; perhaps that message might have been “XML” (eXtensible Markup Language) “Parsing Error.” Doing the same thing in an Internet Explorer 8 (IE8) Web browser I learned that IE8 did not support SVG (Scalar Vector Graphics). From Mozilla SVG Project Frequently Asked Questions I read ‘Why does Mozilla show an “XML Parsing Error” message instead of SVG?’ The answer given there was “This is an XML debugging message to help XML authors correct errors in their XML documents. Mozilla will show the error when there is an XML well formedness error in the file it tried to load. (It doesn’t mean there is an error in Mozilla.).” So I guess that the file intended to be downloadable by clicking on the hyperlink repomd.xml.key might have been the public key for perhaps openSUSE with the key ID of 67b8ac90. Furthermore I suspect that SVG might be used with that Internet-based file corresponding to the hyperlink repomd.xml.key and that there may have been an XML well-formedness error associated with it.

Request 1: If so and this problem has not already been fixed, then for that openSUSE site’s Web master please fix that XML well-formedness error associated with the file corresponding to the hyyperlink repomd.xml.key in the first parent directory above http://opensuse.mirror.netriplex.com/repositories/server:/ltsp/openSUSE_11.4/i586/clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm.

Since I could not obtain the public key for the keyID 67b8ac90 from openSUSE’s Web site, I also could not determine that key’s fingerprint with my computer software. (Maybe as a superuser in a terminal program in openSUSE-11.4 Linux I entered the commands “gpg” for I suppose GnuPG and then “–edit-key repomd2.xml.asc” on a copy repomd2.xml.asc of the file repomd.xml.asc that I made. The latter of these two commands appeared to “hang” the computer program gpg until I probably exited it by some means, perhaps by pressing on the “C” key while holding down the “ctrl” key of my computer’s keyboard. I suppose the reason for that “hanging” of the computer program gpg might have been that the file repomd2.xml.asc, which was a copy of repomd.xml.asc, contained a key signature instead of a public key needed for execution of the command “–edit-key repomd2.xml.asc”.) By comparing that fingerprint with the published fingerprint for that key at either a public key server or an openSUSE Web site one could hope to authenticate that the downloaded file clicfs-1.4.1-54.2-i586.rpm actually came from openSUSE. But I failed to obtain that key or key ID’s fingerprint by any means. Nevertheless I am pretty confident that the downloaded file clicfs-1.4.1-54.2-i586.rpm actually came from openSUSE, since the hyperlink on which I clicked to download it from the Internet was located on an openSUSE Web page.

Request 2: If this has not already been done, please publish the keyID 67b8ac90 and its fingerprint at several of the public key servers: MIT PGP Key Server, PGP Public Key Server, Public Key Server Commands, and/or Welcome to Keyserver: Welcome, if and when that latter public key server becomes available again.

For an openSUSE Web master and/or helper: Thank you in advance for your attention to these matters. After these two requests have been met, you could post that they have been met here in this thread. But since there may still be some useful information for readers like myself here in this posting, my recommendation is that this thread not be deleted after those two requests have been met. Please do not consider this posting as highly critical.–Rather please consider eliminating a mistake and improving things as very normal parts of life in this world.

On 08/27/2011 02:26 PM, 2009Newbie wrote:
>
> On August 17th or 18th or the year 2011 I downloaded the software
> package clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm from ‘Main Page - openSUSE’
> (http://en.opensuse.org/) on the Internet, “Site map,” in an edit
> control beside “Download packages” entering “clicfs” and searching for
> it, and finally clicking on the hyperlink for clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm
> to download that package to my computer. Then to install that package
> in openSUSE-11.4 Linux as a superuser or root user in the “/” directory
> I typed “rpm -i clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm” …

what i just did while logged into openSUSE 11.4 as a regular user:

  1. opened YaST
  2. typed in root’s password when asked
  3. single left clicked “Software Management”
  4. in the search blank of the resulting new window typed clicfs
  5. pressed “Search”
  6. in the results pane (on the right) single left clicked the little
    (empty) box next to clicfs package
  7. single left clicked “Accept” button (lower right)
  8. watched patiently (about 35 seconds) while clicfs installed
  9. closed YaST and wondered why you (having been on this forum for two
    years) didn’t do it like i did it…

and, decided you just need to stop trying to do stuff the way it might
be done on other operating systems or other linux distros…

i humbly suggest you read up some on (say) YaST or administrative
duties, here is a short list:

http://en.opensuse.org/Concepts
http://en.opensuse.org/Concepts_package_management
http://doc.opensuse.org/products/opensuse/openSUSE/opensuse-startup/
http://tinyurl.com/32g4nmp

oh, the bottom line is there is no need to send the openSUSE web master
a note, because everything is working…


DD Caveat
openSUSE®, the “German Engineered Automobile” of operating systems!

On Sat, 27 Aug 2011 12:26:04 +0000, 2009Newbie wrote:

> For an openSUSE Web master and/or helper: Thank you in advance for your
> attention to these matters.

Please note that the openSUSE web team doesn’t read this forum - if you
want to contact them directly, you need to use the information at:

http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Communication_channels#Contact_Info

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

Thanks, DenverD and Jim Henderson, for kindly taking the time to reply to my posting. In answer to DenverD’s wondering, 1) here in my mother’s home I currently don’t have the capability set up to connect to the Internet using my installation of an openSUSE-11.4 Linux operating system and my computer. In the year 2009 I was able to connect to the Internet using openSUSE 11.1 using a dial-up Internet connection; but in openSUSE 11.1 my computer was frequently and at least sometimes quickly disconnected from the Internet, but not by me. Things got even more difficult in that regard when for at least one of the Linux kernels eventually used in openSUSE 11.3 I could not obtain a dial-up modem driver prepared for my computer’s modem. I think the solution to obtain one would have been to obtain, say more-generic, kernel-appropriate, C-computer-language source code for a modem driver and compile it with the appropriate Linux kernel using the respective Gnu Not Unix (GNU) C-language compiler as a part of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC); although I obtained the kernel-development software “tools” for such compiling, so far I have managed to avoid ever compiling a Linux kernel.

  1. I also did not have an installation, openSUSE-11.4 Digital Video Disc (DVD) set up as a software repository in Yet another Setup Tool 2 (YaST2). But after setting up that repository I could not obtain the clicfs software package from that DVD using YaST2’s “Software Management” in a manner similar to what you described. So either that clicfs software package is not on that DVD; or else I don’t have my DVD repository set up correctly.

But here within my mother’s home I do have a means to connect to the Internet using a cheap, dial-up Internet service that has been working in another operating system on a computer. Therefore in that operating system I could download the RedHat Package Manager (.rpm) clicfs software package from the Internet using that dial-up Internet service. That software package could then be transferred to the “/” directory of my openSUSE-11.4 Linux operating system where it could be installed using the command “rpm -i clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm”. One of the attractive features of openSUSE was that openSUSE 11.1, like FC3 with which I had some familiarity, used the .rpm system. Gratefully it is still possible to use the .rpm system in openSUSE 11.4.

For DenverD: You did not mention inserting a DVD into your computer to obtain the clicfs software package. And you didn’t mention connecting to the Internet either. So I am going to guess that you might be paying for a continuous and fast Internet connection service that you can almost take for granted as running while you work on your computer, something I think probably a lot of people have these days. And you didn’t mention receiving a message at least partially overlapping the contents of the following message I received following or during my offline installation of the clicfs package: “warning: clicfs-1.4.1-54.2.i586.rpm: Header V3 DSA/SHA1” (Digital Signature Algorithm/Secure Hash Algorithm 1) “Signature, key ID” (IDentification) “67b8ac90: NOKEY.” So another guess of mine is that you did not receive such a message prior to, during, or right after your installation of the clicfs software package. If these guesses of mine in this paragraph are all correct, it would mean to me that the “NOKEY” problem I encountered in the manual, rpm-command installation of the clicfs package did not occur in your presumably online installation of that packaged using YaST2. That is a little surprising to me. I guessed that the “NOKEY” problem would have occurred by either the offline, rpm-command installation or the online installation of the clicfs software package. So to continue guessing, I guess that this might mean that the on August 18, 2011 problematic online file repomd.xml.key was not and/or did not need to be accessed in your later online installation of the clicfs package.

For DenverD: You might wonder how I could do much of anything in openSUSE 11.4, given that I don’t currently have a means to access the Internet here in my mother’s home in openSUSE-11.4 on my computer and how such a thing could be. In my mind there are multiple answers to this question: 1) A fast Internet service generally costs more money than the $4.70 United States per month dial-up Internet I am using that I originally obtained via http://vtisp.com/ or else http://www.vtisp.com/ on the Internet. So, saving some money on Internet service fees, I have been using the cheap, dial-up, but not a fast Internet service here in my mother’s home. 2) For production over a period of years I have been using Fedora Core-3 and openSUSE Linux operating systems to produce HyperText Markup Language (.html) documents containing Greek and/or mathematical symbols with the free programs LaTeX2HTML and LaTeX documents. Also, but not very recently, I compiled some Fortran programs using early versions of the free-for-personal use, Intel Fortran Compiler for Linux and later the Fortran compiler contained in the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) available for openSUSE Linux. Gratefully I could execute all of those programs while offline in a Linux operating system. 3) Even if I could connect to the Internet using a dial-up Internet connection in openSUSE 11.4 and such a connection could be maintained without frequent interruptions, it could take lots of time to download large files from the Internet using such a low-download-rate Internet connection to make updates to installed software or else to download large, new programs from the Internet. So it makes sense to use a fast Internet connection when obtaining large downloads or when trying to upgrade an openSUSE operating system while online. Gratefully I do have multiple, fee-less means to connect to the Internet outside my mother’s home: a) in a kind friend’s home using the fast Internet service purchased by that friend, that person’s external modem, and my ethernet card cabled by means of an RJ-45 cable connected to that external modem. In that friend’s home in openSUSE 11.1, after having difficulties connecting to the Internet and obtaining data from it, I gratefully and finally succeeded in setting up that person’s modem as a gateway, based on a tip I read on the Internet; I certainly lacked experience with that process the first time I tried to do something practical on the Internet in an openSUSE operating system using that kind friend’s external modem and my ethernet card. But with openSUSE 11.3 and 11.4 the software setup with that external modem and my ethernet card has gratefully been very “user-friendly” or I think maybe even automatic, if I remember correctly, for me! b) Within several miles of my mother’s home I have so far found at least two publicly accessible places where due to the kindness of people there I can connect to the Internet using WiFi Internet services which are provided at no charge to both me and other visitors. WiFi Internet access became technically possible for me after I in November of the year 2010 purchased a WiFi card which can be plugged into the left-hand side of my portable, notebook computer. 4) For the backup of openSUSE-11.4 on the hard-disk drive of my computer I have a backup stored on a separate partition of that hard-disk drive that is accessible while offline. That should work as as a hard-drive backup long as that hard-disk drive works. I don’t yet have an external hard-disk drive for use as a backup of all of the software on my computer’s hard-disk drive, in case the main computer’s hard-drive were to fail. I have had acquaintances who both have paid for fast Internet services and who have DVD writing or so-called “burning” drives kindly produce Fedora Core-3, and openSUSE-11.1, 11.3, and 11.4 installation DVDs for me that are designed to be accessible while offline. But two currently complex and unsolved challenges are i) the exact causes of some failures of my DVD drive to read some of those optical discs without read errors and ii) cost-effectively what to do about those challenges. I suspect that I may have had problems that are not all precisely determined with both my computer’s currently nine-to-ten-year-old DVD drive and with one or more optical discs. One of my forum postings which alludes or will allude to some of those problems is located at http://forums.opensuse.org/forums/english/get-technical-help-here/install-boot-login/464580-attempting-boot-ext-cd-writer-error-message-kernel-panic-not-syncing-no-init-found.html#post2378575 on the Internet.

yes, i installed clicfs via high speed broad band easily and quickly…i
am sorry you cannot…

your two other issues:

> But two currently complex and unsolved
> challenges are i) the exact causes of some failures of my DVD drive to
> read some of those optical discs without read errors

there are many many potential causes: 1) the burning drive’s burn head
may be just a little bit out of perfect alignment making a disk that
gives some trouble to other read drives but not itself; 2) your read
drive may be just slightly out of alignment; 3) your read lens may be
gunked up with (for example) cigarette smoke, or other contaminates in
the air…you said your machine is ten years old…find a drinking
glass, or window, or mirror surface which has not been cleaned in ten
years and see how much ‘gunk’ in on it; 4) the CD media itself may be
deficient…all blank media is not born equal…some of it you can
maybe get only 7 or 8 good burns out of 10, or 15; 5) and there are
other variables…

> and ii) cost-effectively what to do about those challenges.

-when burning disks burn them at the absolutely lowest speed the burner
can be set to…yes, it will take more time to burn but your will have
less failures…

-if either the burner or reader’s home has an tobacco smokers then you
probably need to buy or borrow a lens cleaner…hi-fi or computer shops
should have them…it is like a CD disk with a couple of brushes or soft
pads which can gently contact the lens, and they are sold with a special
cleaning liquid–FOLLOW the instructions (do NOT use too much liquid and
do not run the cleaning disk dry)

-DVD/CD burning hardware are absolutely NOT something that stays good
enough to use for long periods of time…i bought a name brand burner in
about 2005/6 for like $100 US and it worked only a couple of years…i
am pretty sure the makes do NOT intend them to work forever;

-use the best blanks you can afford, or expect some level of failure;

good luck!!


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Engineered Automobile” of operating systems!

Thanks, Jim Henderson, for kindly providing the hyperlink for me to contact an openSUSE person about this issue. As a result I sent a copy of the opening posting in this thread to an openSUSE electronic-mail address.

On Mon, 29 Aug 2011 17:36:05 +0000, 2009Newbie wrote:

> Thanks, Jim Henderson, for kindly providing the hyperlink for me to
> contact an openSUSE person about this issue. As a result I sent a copy
> of the opening posting in this thread to an openSUSE electronic-mail
> address.

Glad to help out - also, just a friendly note, you don’t need to spell
out things like DVD-ROM, DVD-RW, etc - pretty much everyone here is going
to know what you mean. You can save yourself some time by just using the
common abbreviations and don’t need to provide links to explain what you
mean for those common terms. :slight_smile:

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C