openSUSE "Live USB" won't save update after reboot

This is all new for me. I’ve always used Linux as an installed OS vice a portable one but wanted to give it a go.

I’ve created a LIVE USB using LinuxLive USB Creator from the openSUSE-12.1-KDE-LiveCD-i686.iso file. I have it booting on an HP Netbook [1035NR]](http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?cc=us&lc=en&dlc=en&product=3832534) via the USB key.

Couple problems so far:

  • No WiFi

I am sure that this is simply a driver update issue and would be fixed but for the next issue

  • Updating failure

When I attempt to do an update of the files via YAST, it seems to attempt the update of all files listed as update files. Then it requests a reboot but upon rebooting and then going into YAST update again, the same update files are once again listed It seems that the update wasn’t persistent after the reboot.

What did I do incorrectly or is there something that I missed that is required to make updates to the files persistent between reboots.

Thanks!

You better ask one question per thread. Now you will get a mixture of answers where you (and others) may hope that they can find out what belongs to what. Also your title (while basicaly a good one) only covers your second question (and there is not much info going with the first question).

Your second question is very simple to answer. I live USB system, like a live CD system, only “lives” in the RAM of your PC. Everything you change there is lost at system shutdown. And nothing is ever written to the CD (or the USB).

A live system is mainly for demonstrating and testing (does the hardware function with this distrubution/level).

I wasn’t looking for an answer for the WiFi. That is an easy fix and I was simply noting that it didn’t work yet.

The updating is the issue and it seems that you’ve answered that part though I was under the impression that the files could be updated on the live medium. I will look for ways of possibly copying newer file version to the USB and maybe get it to work that way. Thanks for your reply!

I guess, that what you realy want is not a live system, but a real installed system on a sticky. One that contains your installation and your configuration and your intstalled user(s) with your/their personal data ( documents/music/whatever). Thus that you can stick it in any system you meet( well, it should have an USB and should be able to boot from it) and then run it.

When that is the case (sorry, I do not know a specific name for such a beast) then that is something different. I guess the main problem in creatinng such a thing is that during installation several choices are made about drivers loaded, etc. Thus when such a system could work on system A with Nvidia graphics and Wifi type x, etc., it probably won’t work in another system with another make of graphicsm Wifi, etc. But I am in no way an expert in this area.

My suggestion would be to start a new thread with a title that points to what you would like to have. Hopefully it will attrackt people with more experience in this.

The above of course only if my guess about your whish is correct.

Also see Live CD - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia which btw points to a possibility to write back changes to the live device when it is (re)writable.

What you suggest is almost what I intend for the Live USB except that I intend to only use it on this netbook and nothing else.

Thanks for the suggestions and I’ll create a new thread more fine-tuned with what you posted above. I’ll all read the link you supplied as well.

Appreciate your help/suggestions!

In that case the general idea is to do a normal install it while letting the installer use/create partitions on the USB disk only.

A problem that I remember to have seen mentioned here in the forums, is that when the sticky is not in the system, Grub may not boot the Windows that still is on the system. But that may depend on where the bootloader is installed (MBR or root file system). I think concentrating on this is the crux.

An alternative solution might be to put Grub on the sticky and let the BIOS decide (with your help) where to boot from.

Suggestions fropm others are wanted here :wink:

On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 18:46:05 GMT, hcvv <hcvv@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org>
wrote:

>
>In that case the general idea is to do a normal install it while letting
>the installer use/create partitions on the USB disk only.
>
>A problem that I remember to have seen mentioned here in the forums, is
>that when the sticky is not in the system, Grub may not boot the Windows
>that still is on the system. But that may depend on where the bootloader
>is installed (MBR or root file system). I think concentrating on this is
>the crux.
>
>An alternative solution might be to put Grub on the sticky and let the
>BIOS decide (with your help) where to boot from.
>
>Suggestions fropm others are wanted here :wink:

I have seen stuff on some opensuse form that discussed bootable USB
flash/HD that had the “live” disc and a “COW” partition for persistent
storage. Not sure if / how updates could be incorporated.

?-)

That’s just for the home. The system cannot be updated, read hcvv’s post. The OP should perform a full install on a USB device, creating enough space to update/extend the install.

On 2011-12-30 15:36, Knurpht wrote:

>> I have seen stuff on some opensuse form that discussed bootable USB
>> flash/HD that had the “live” disc and a “COW” partition for persistent
>> storage. Not sure if / how updates could be incorporated.
>>
>> ?-)
> That’s just for the home. The system cannot be updated, read hcvv’s
> post. The OP should perform a full install on a USB device, creating
> enough space to update/extend the install.

It could be updated. There is an ISO image with is not writeable, and a COW
partition that can be written to. That’s one way. I have seen live systems
in CD that write configuration files (not home) to a loop filesystem on the
HD (on NTFS). I don’t see why you can not write any file you like. Simply
any file that is on the writeable part is used, and if not, then take the
one from the iso.

If updates do not stick, IMO it is a bug.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)