openSUSE, how good for servers?

So, I’m very used to openSUSE in desktop use. I’ve never used Linux that works so smooth as oS. So is it good enough for learning some server masterying, or should I use Debian or centOS , or maybe NetBSD in the beginning, what do you think? NetBSD is the most stable (I really don’t know), but is it worth learning, or should I grab openSUSE?

Works fine. There’s nothing that says you have to run a GUI. When running as a console only server, it’s as good as any other Linux distro.

I run various openSUSE servers and I have yet to encounter any problems with them, whether performance related or stability ones.

All UNIX-like systems are pretty stable. I wouldn’t say NetBSD is the most stable, though it is certainly one of the easiest to port.

On Tue, 2009-04-21 at 14:56 +0000, Growlboy wrote:
> So, I’m very used to openSUSE in desktop use. I’ve never used Linux that
> works so smooth as oS. So is it good enough for learning some server
> masterying, or should I use Debian or centOS , or maybe NetBSD in the
> beginning, what do you think? NetBSD is the most stable (I really don’t
> know), but is it worth learning, or should I grab openSUSE?
>
>

I’m just going to say it… if Ubuntu is indicative of Debian, then
the Debian folks are CLUELESS about server stuff.

IMHO, openSUSE makes the best server out of the consumer distributions.

If this is for something that is going to last more than a year or
two… then I recommend looking at SLES.

Thanks guys.

I have around 50+ openSUSE servers running. No GUI. No monitor/keyboard/mouse. They are all doing what they are supposed to do.

ken yap wrote:

>
> Works fine. There’s nothing that says you have to run a GUI. When
> running as a console only server, it’s as good as any other Linux
> distro.
>
>

What’s the problem with running a GUI on a server - is it just the old “REAL
sysadmins only use the CLI” paradigm?

Alan

Overhead, resources and possible additional security considerations from the GUI.

Waste of resources, especially RAM. When you consider that Firefox alone can tie up as much RAM as all the daemons of a Linux server, you realise how much goes into a GUI.

You can still have your GUI when you need to. You can run the X server on your desktop and run the GUI app on the big iron, e.g. YaST, using X forwarding over ssh.