OpenSUSE 13.2 on Dell Optiplex 755

My main PC (The one I use daily) is a Dell Optiplex 755 with 8GB of RAM, an AMD (Manufactured by AMD, Released by MSI) Radeon HD 6450, a 1TB HDD, and a Core 2 Duo E6550 @2.3 Ghz. I am wondering atm if it would be a good idea for me to put OpenSUSE onto this machine, I’m currently running Windows 7 and yes I have a background of Linux usage so I’d know a bit of what I were doing but my background was strictly on Ubuntu and Debian based operating systems. What drove me away from Linux initially is the fact that every OS out there seemed to have some sort of bug that broke the entire OS if I were to do something wrong, I hated the constant maintenance. However, I have heard that OpenSUSE/SUSE is pretty much the most stable Linux based operating system out there right now, is that correct? I have not had to do any sort of maintenance on this machine in a full year running Windows 7, how would OpenSUSE fair against that? I am of course going to wait a bit before I even try and load SUSE onto this machine, right now I am waiting for the release of Windows 10 sometime in June, and I am hoping that it will be a fair operating system, because I’d like to take that free offer.

Do you realy mean there were no (security) updates for your Windows system in a whole year? I do not use Windows at all, but hearing rumours about Windows, I find that unbelievable.

I can assure you that in openSUSE there are security updates, more of them in a week (I normaly apply them only once a week).

Well yes, security updates, but they don’t get in my way, I have Windows set to install updates every week on Tuesday and it doesn’t require me to restart until later at night at which point I’m going to sleep anyways.
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I am going to create a live USB of OpenSUSE to test on this machine, yes I realize that since it is a live USB it will not have the same performance it would have installed to the PC, I will take that into consideration. Wish me luck.

Linux is not for everybody, and if you don’t like rolling up your sleeves once in while, I’d suggest it is not for you. It is free to install and use, but effort must be made on the part of the administrator to keep it running the way one likes, so there can be effort involved (kind of like maintaining a hand-built or kitset car).

I’m posting this from the OpenSUSE live USB. It all runs fine (KDE desktop) and also, @“Linux is not for everybody, and if you don’t like rolling up your sleeves once in while, I’d suggest it is not for you. It is free to install and use, but effort must be made on the part of the administrator to keep it running the way one likes, so there can be effort involved (kind of like maintaining a hand-built or kitset car).” when things such as system flaws and bugs are the cause for maintenance, there’s no excuse for it really, even though this is the case.
===Edit===
I’m actually legitimately impressed at how well it detected ALL of my drivers, it detected things automatically that even Windows 7 couldn’t (Though Windows 8, 8.1 could, but SUSE did even better than those) such as my sound card drivers and my graphics card (Both of which I have to install manually in a fresh W7 install), it also detected my china-made not-so-well-known unbranded wireless usb card, which Windows 7 also couldn’t (You don’t know how long it took me to hunt for the drivers when I reformatted about a year back). Overall, genuinely impressed when it comes to hardware detection.

The “free” Linux distros are developed mostly by volunteers, of a wide range of experience, in their spare time = one of the main reasons you can get it for “free”. Under those parameters, it is remarkable that there are as few system flaws and bugs as there are.

… but, it is not completely “free”, you have to work for it. So, be prepared to work for it.

Or, don’t bother with it.

I might add that, in my 4 decades of IT, it has been my experience that Windows – including the latest versions – required a lot more time struggling with problems because the design of the internal mechanisms is buried deep in a vault some 300 miles below the surface of Silicon Valley.:wink:

Does OpenSUSE have LTS releases?
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And yes I realize that most Linux distros are maintained by a community of people who develop in their free time. However, when a release is under development for a year and a half there is no real excuse to release it with OS breaking bugs that arise when performing simple everyday tasks (This is what happened last time I used Ubuntu, and even then Ubuntu is maintained by a company, Canonical.)

Also I’d like to say that I run CentOS on my web server, I am not a Linux noob and I definitely know maintenance, it’s just that when I run into OS breaking bugs it sort of ruins things for me.

Well, that’s part and parcel of using Linux. If you want enterprise-level support, then with SLED/SLED or Red Hat are good options. Bugs happen and are a fact of life. It can be inconvenient, but participation is part of being involved with community-based distros, and that includes bug reporting.

How do I get the Windows (Or super) key to open the KDE menu? Also, how about setting up other keyboard shortcuts such as snapping and maximizing/minimizing? I haven’t looked through everything on the Live USB install so excuse me if the answer is obvious. I’d just simply like to know as I use keyboard shutcorts extremely often, if not more than I use my mouse.

System Settings >> Shortcuts and Gestures >> …

BTW, there are limitations with what keys can be assigned. Here’s a thread that may be of interest to you
https://forums.opensuse.org/showthread.php/502092-Mapping-Windows-Super-Key-to-Open-the-Menu-in-13-2-KDE

In particular

https://software.opensuse.org/package/ksuperkey

Ah, I see thank you Deano.