OpenSuse 13.2 Live USB Does Not Boot

Hi,

After some time away, I thought to come back to OpenSuse.
As I am interested in Gnome 3, I have downloaded the ISO of 13.2, tested MD5 Sum, and used Lili USB creator.
It automatically detected it is Gnome 3 and live mode.

Booting from USB, I end up with a black text menu not grub, the best thing that happens is that it gives me a command line.

What’s wrong? How can I get it to boot normally to Grub then to Gnome 3?

PS: I am on windows 8 at the moment.
My Hardware is Fujitsu Siemens T4310

On 2015-01-09 09:06, limotux wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> After some time away, I thought to come back to OpenSuse.
> As I am interested in Gnome 3, I have downloaded the ISO of 13.2, tested
> MD5 Sum, and used Lili USB creator.

Where is documented that you can use “Lili USB creator” with openSUSE?

https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Create_a_Live_USB_stick_using_Windows


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

Muchas Gracias Carlos,

Thanks, it installed to the USB using ImageUSB as shown on the link you provided.
I could boot, and have options to boot from hard disk, rescue, install… but not an option to boot from the USB as a live USB.
I just used defaults of ImageUSB

How can I get it as a live USB with persistence?
Sorry if I am asking silly questions.

Did you down load the Gnome live version? the full installer can not run the OS just install but it has both KDE and gnome and several other on oit.

Sorry!

Seems I made a mistake.
The downloaded file was the 4,7 GB ISO not the Live Gnome!
Downloading now.
Will keep you posted.
Thanks

On 2015-01-09 16:56, limotux wrote:

> Thanks, it installed to the USB using ‘ImageUSB’
> (http://www.osforensics.com/tools/write-usb-images.html) as shown on the
> link you provided.
> I could boot, and have options to boot from hard disk, rescue,
> install… but not an option to boot from the USB as a live USB.
> I just used defaults of ‘ImageUSB’
> (http://www.osforensics.com/tools/write-usb-images.html)
>
> How can I get it as a live USB with persistence?
> Sorry if I am asking silly questions.

Mmm. Probably you downloaded the wrong image. If it has about 4.7 GB, it
can not run as live, only install.

You probably want the gnome live. You have to click on “alternative
versions” to see the kde or gnome versions. There is also an xfce image,
specific for rescue work, which can not be installed on HD, with a
different choice of packages.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

Thanks…

It was my fault as I admitted above, I downloaded the wrong .iso

Things have changed a lot over the past few years. It was possible generaly to download any .iso and use any USB creator and that’s all… now it seems things getting more specific!

Still having a problem updating my live usb disk, Yast breaks in the middle.
Few years ago I had this problem with opensuse, and was sorted out by updating some of the packages at a time… but now I tried the same and it is not working… may be I need to get more specific with which packages to update and select others and update till I am done…!

Anybody encountered this problem? How could it be sorted out?

Sorry … just to change the title of the thread!

On 2015-01-10 14:36, limotux wrote:
>
> Thanks…
>
> It was my fault as I admitted above, I downloaded the wrong .iso

I saw that later :slight_smile:

> Things have changed a lot over the past few years. It was possible
> generaly to download any .iso and use any USB creator and that’s all…
> now it seems things getting more specific!

No, the openSUSE live iso was different since I remember. If I remember
correctly, you could boot it directly but had to do something else to
make hybrid. And perhaps something else to place the DVD on a USB that I
don’t remember.

On some other distros you needed extra steps to install a booter.

Currently on openSUSE you have to do nothing to them, just copy (raw) to
the USB stick. Plain cat, cp, or dd works.

> Still having a problem updating my live usb disk, Yast breaks in the
> middle.

Of course, it is persistent but you can not update it. Not the core. You
can add packages, yes, and perhaps update some.

If you want updates, install it first.

If you want an updated live, create your own live with susestudio.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

Thanks Carlos,

So, may be I will install to have dual boot with windows 8 but I am scared to do it…

Last time I tried this, may be I did not properly select where to install Grub and it was installed properly but it did not include the windows installation with it. That time I had and could see the windows partition but can’t boot it.

Now I am still having the linux partition. but as explained I’m scared of repeating the same:O

On 2015-01-11 12:06, limotux wrote:
>
> Thanks Carlos,
>
> So, may be I will install to have dual boot with windows 8 but I am
> scared to do it…
>
> Last time I tried this, may be I did not properly select where to
> install Grub and it was installed properly but it did not include the
> windows installation with it. That time I had and could see the windows
> partition but can’t boot it.
>
> Now I am still having the linux partition. but as explained I’m scared
> of repeating the same:O

Understandable.

My laptop is double boot with Windows 7 and Linux (two linuxes,
actually), no problem. Windows 8 I think it is a bit different, and
things get interesting if your machine is modern and uses GPT partition
tables and UEFI instead of BIOS, as is typically the case when you have
Windows 8 natively installed.

An alternative for you would be to use a virtualization system instead,
like virtualbox or vmware player. Linux would not be installed as a
double boot system; instead, you would first boot Windows, start
virtualbox, then select Linux to run, inside a window in Windows, or
full screen. It might run slower, though, but it allows you to become
familiar with Linux without “touching” your machine.

Another alternative, specially interesting if you have USB3 or eSATA,
would be to install Linux only to an external disk. You can even
disconnect the internal hard disk during installation in order to be
absolutely sure that a mistake doesn’t touch it.

In any case, there are dozens of threads of people here asking how to do
it. You can read them, or simply ask for advice, posting first details
about your system: exact partition layout, for starters, and whether
your machine is UEFI.

If you want to try a double boot install, I’d like the output of this
(in any linux):


> lsblk --output NAME,KNAME,RA,RM,RO,SIZE,TYPE,FSTYPE,LABEL,PARTLABEL,MOUNTPOINT,UUID,PARTUUID,WWN,MODEL,ALIGNMENT

and


fdisk -l
gdisk -l /dev/sda     (guessing)

and then the people here can suggest further advice :slight_smile:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

First ascertain if you have an EFI BIOS. If a relatively new machine that came with Win 8 then you do have EFI and most likely Windows is installed in EFI mode. So you need to boot the DVD or other install media in EFI mode. If it boots in legacy mode it will install as an MBR type (non EFI) format and then Grub will not be able to boot Windows because of the mismatch of boot modes. So you must boot the install media in EFI mode. To be sure of doing this you need to invoke the EFI boot menu this often but not always is to press F12 at the boot splash screen. Check the machines documentation to verify how the EFI boot menu should be invoked. If you have Secure boot turned on ( default in WIndows system) you need to check the box for secure boot in the installer options.

To verify you are installing correctly observe the partitions and grub selections. It should be grub2-efi and you should have a small partition FAT formatted mounted as /boot/efi. This should be an existing partition. If the above condition aer not shown then it is not a EFI install.

I have opensuse dual-booting with Windows 8. It is working well, though I don’t actually have much use for Windows 8.

I’ve installed in two different UEFI systems, and I have helped forum folk in their UEFI installs. You should be able to do it.

(I am assuming UEFI, because most new Windows 8 systems come that way). If Windows 8 uses UEFI, then you will need your opensuse system to also use UEFI.

One of changes – image/disk identification by MBR ID (e.g. 0x2e2ced92), that is defined in ISO as Application ID. MBR ID is usually in /boot folder also.

E.g. you may recreate ISO using just its content by

mkisofs -R -J -v -A “${MBR_id}” -b “${isolinux_path}” -c “${catalog_file}”
-no-emul-boot -boot-load-size 4 -boot-info-table
-V “${Disk_label}” -o “${ISO_new}” “${Content_directory}”

Here -A “${MBR_id}” option is mandatory to able to mount ISO content and
to reach grafical desktop; without it, you may start boot loader
succesfully, but you will get to black screen in middle of boot…

One another change – you must specify disk, where is ISO, if you want to keep data in USB key. E.g.

isofrom=/dev/disk/by-uuid/%UUID%:/%ISO% isofrom_device=/dev/disk/by-uuid/%UUID% isofrom_system=/%ISO%

You replace %UUID% with real UUID (and %ISO% as real path in disk) or define it as variable.

You may use even GRUB4DOS to create LiveUSB with preserving current data in USB flash drive in Windows,
see https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Create_a_Live_USB_stick_using_Windows#Using_GRUB4DOS
and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVGXWV1zcq4