OpenSuSE 12.2 does not display password promt after displaying "Welcome to emergency mode. ..."

Hi,

I have no idea, what the problem is, but when I run normal 12.2 (64-bit default kernel) boot (in contrary to failsafe) I run into the “Welcome to emergeny mode. …”, the problem is, that I have also no idea why.
But I do not get a password prompt, as it should be.
All I can do at this point is try to press Ctrl-Strg-Del and hope this helps or press the reset button.

Anybody has any idea, how I could cicumvent this problem and log into emergency console to repair the original problem.

Thanks in advance

Dieter

On 01/17/2013 08:56 PM, didiw wrote:
> to repair the original problem.

what is the “original problem” and what have you already done trying to
fix it?

is it probable that something you did trying to fix the ‘original
problem’ caused this new problem??

and can back track to undo that??

do you have a good backup that precedes the ‘original problem’?


dd http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat

On 2013-01-17 20:56, didiw wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> I have no idea, what the problem is, but when I run normal 12.2 (64-bit
> default kernel) boot (in contrary to failsafe) I run into the “Welcome
> to emergeny mode. …”, the problem is, that I have also no idea why.
> But I do not get a password prompt, as it should be.
> All I can do at this point is try to press Ctrl-Strg-Del and hope this
> helps or press the reset button.

Supposedly you get a prompt at which you have to type root’s password,
and then repair the problem. If you don’t get a prompt, try booting in
systemv mode, or from a live.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

How do I know, what the problem is, if I even cannot get to the emergeny console? It is like in most cases I have read about, that there are no error messages displayed before for the “Welcome to emergeny mode …”, but in my case the problem is, that I even cannot get into emergeny console to find out, if it is a problem with a partition or something else.

Unfortuately not, because I have this problem since upgrading from 12.1 to 12.2.

How, if I cannot get into the system? I tried to use the rescue system, but could not find anything.

Regards, Dieter

I had thought of that too and tried to enter the root password, but it was displayed normally, so there was no password reading active. And there should be a repetition of the password prompt, when I just type return, but the cursor just advances to the next line.

and then repair the problem. If you don’t get a prompt, try booting in
systemv mode, or from a live.

But what does this help? I booted sucessfully with the rescue system and could not find any problem. All partitions were clean and there was nothting to be seen in the messages file. So where else to look?
And I prefer to find out, what this problem is

Regards, Dieter

On 2013-01-18 02:06, didiw wrote:
> But what does this help? I booted sucessfully with the rescue system
> and could not find any problem. All partitions were clean and there was
> nothting to be seen in the messages file. So where else to look?
> And I prefer to find out, what this problem is

which is why I suggest to boot in old systemv mode, it is more verbose.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

On 2013-01-18 01:56, didiw wrote:
> Unfortuately not, because I have this problem since upgrading from 12.1
> to 12.2.

Which method?

Online upgrade
method

Offline upgrade
method


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

On 01/18/2013 01:56 AM, didiw wrote:
> Unfortuately not, because I have this problem since upgrading from 12.1
> to 12.2.

then you probably are facing one of two things:

  1. the install media you used is somehow corrupted:

did you check it before using it to upgrade from 12.1, by first checking
the md5sum of the downloaded iso before burning the install media, and
then boot from the media and select “Check Installation Media” BEFORE
installing, like you see here: http://tinyurl.com/3qde66h

if you didn’t do those things you might be trying to install garbage,
which will only return garbage…so, check your install media–if it is
perfect then you must have some hardware that is not “Linux friendly”

  1. back to Carlos’s question: exactly how did you upgrade from 12.1 to
    12.2, many many folks do that incorrectly and often the result is they
    are faced with unusual and unexplainable problems–fact is i’m here in
    the forums almost every day and your symptoms sound VERY unusual to me…

there are only three supported and recommended ways to upgrade from
one version to another, pick ONE and follow the directions…do not pick
some steps from one way and decide to mix it into the steps from another
way, pick one way and follow it start to finish, all steps and no others:

a. http://tinyurl.com/35p966c

b. http://tinyurl.com/93uemsr

c. http://tinyurl.com/7l4m2td

so, if you did some steps from one way, and then skipped some steps and
did some stuff from another way–then it is highly likely you killed
your system and will need to repair it fully by doing a clean, format
install…otherwise you could spend months looking around trying to
figure out what configs or old system code is left over from some
previous install of openSUSE or (maybe even) some other distro…

of course, you might find several here with other ideas, so listen to
them also…and, read my sig caveat prior to doing anything i suggest.


dd http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat

Offline upgrade method. Burned a DVD.

I don’t think I did that, but I had installed another system before, which does not show any problems, so I susposed so far, that the DVD does not have problems.

if you didn’t do those things you might be trying to install garbage,
which will only return garbage…so, check your install media–if it is
perfect then you must have some hardware that is not “Linux friendly”

That hardware is running Linux for quite a few years already, so it is probably Linux friendly. Why should that change?

  1. back to Carlos’s question: exactly how did you upgrade from 12.1 to
    12.2, many many folks do that incorrectly and often the result is they
    are faced with unusual and unexplainable problems–fact is i’m here in
    the forums almost every day and your symptoms sound VERY unusual to me…

As I answered the previous post already, I burned a DVD, then booted from it and followed the sequence to update. Or is there anything special you 're after?

there are only three supported and recommended ways to upgrade from
one version to another, pick ONE and follow the directions…do not pick
some steps from one way and decide to mix it into the steps from another
way, pick one way and follow it start to finish, all steps and no others:

a. SDB:System upgrade - openSUSE

b. openSUSE 12.2: Chapter 16. Upgrading the System and System Changes

c. SDB:Offline upgrade - openSUSE

I followed method c)

so, if you did some steps from one way, and then skipped some steps and
did some stuff from another way–then it is highly likely you killed
your system and will need to repair it fully by doing a clean, format
install…otherwise you could spend months looking around trying to
figure out what configs or old system code is left over from some
previous install of openSUSE or (maybe even) some other distro…

I see no way to mix this method with others or do I miss something;)?

of course, you might find several here with other ideas, so listen to
them also…and, read my sig caveat prior to doing anything i suggest.

Thanks in advance

Dieter

On 01/18/2013 04:06 PM, didiw wrote:
>
>> c. ‘SDB:Offline upgrade - openSUSE’ (http://tinyurl.com/7l4m2td)
>>
> I followed method c)

including all the steps listed below “After the upgrade” and “Stale
configuration files”

i ask, because it seems to be self evident that you have had a failed
upgrade…which is why high up in the how-to reads:

“Do a full backup. Any upgrade procedure can occasionally fail, and
render your system unbootable and/or unrunable. Repairs are possible but
not always; it is better to work with a good safety net. After the
failure, you can learn the reason and attempt again (after recovery from
the backup), or give up and try a fresh install, with the knowledge that
no data was lost.”

so, earlier i recommended format install…it is your time, so you are
sure welcome to continue to try to learn what failed and why, and
restore from backup and try again…

as for where you wrote: “That hardware is running Linux for quite a few
years already, so it is probably -Linux friendly-. Why should that change?”
i offer: the hardware has not changed, but it is a fact that today’s
kernel/modules does not support all previous hardware…perhaps you
are unlucky…one way to try to find out is to boot from a live CD and
give everything a try… if something doesn’t work then log a bug and . . .


dd

On 2013-01-18 15:26, didiw wrote:
> Offline upgrade method. Burned a DVD.

Ah. That method needs several thing done after the upgrade “finishes”,
as explained in that wiki.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

On 2013-01-18 16:06, didiw wrote:
> Thanks in advance

Forgot to say, or repeat: did you try yet in systemv mode? If not, do so
ASAP.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))