openSUSE 11.2 freezes

Hey all,

I just installed openSUSE 11.2 KDE via LiveCD on my desktop computer and have been loving it.

The problem is that it will randomly freeze and requires a restart. I’ve tried booting up in safe-mode, but it still does it. Also, when it does, the screen flickers and flashes in and out before it freezes.

I would be grateful to anyone that could help.

And before anyone asks, yes, I have my NVIDIA drivers.

Hiim:
Can you post the output of command “dmesg”

For whatever reason, KDE froze every time I tried to login, and restricted me to the console login. Having installed openSUSE very recently on my desktop, I didn’t have anything moved onto the computer, and only a few packages installed, so I’m seeing if a fresh install won’t help. Thanks for the quick reply, and if I have any more problems regarding KDE, I will post back here.

Hey again,

well, it’s happened again, and it’s freezing as soon as I log in, and if it doesn’t, when I open a menu or application, the screen glitches and freezes. I think it might have to do with my recent installation of Java, but who knows?

Due to being unable to login, I can’t post the output of dmesg. I could login to console and try if that would help, however?

Did you try booting to fail safe?

Did you try booting to run level 3, and installing a different graphic driver? openSUSE Graphic Card Practical Theory Guide for Users - openSUSE Forums

You may also wish to consider running a memory test.

Do you have another Operating System running on this PC, and if so, is it stable?

I have booted it to fail safe and into run level 3. I do not have another OS on this computer (windows, ugh), and I have run a memory test, but it just restarted my computer after going to a black screen.

I’ve downloaded and installed nouveu, but it doesn’t tell me anywhere in your guide how to switch to this driver.

nouveu is still very new and I don’t think that it will work with the stock 11.2 kernel

What video card do you have? If older then you might need to use an older driver.

Also other things can cause freezes, including bad sectors on the disk. When it freezes do you see constant disk activity? Also if you run out of space for temp files on the root partition.

Does the same happens when you boot from the liveCD?

Does the memory test run for a while or it reboots your computer as soon as you start it?

Having a memory test fail is not good, but if I read this correctly, it did not boot far enough to run even the start of the memory test? Or did the memory test start and then the problem of a reboot to a black screen? If the later, then you have hardware problems.

When I boot from the liveCD, it boots up fine. I can browse the web, run a terminal, etc. As for the memory test, it reboots the computer as soon as I use it.

Having a memory test fail is not good, but if I read this correctly, it did not boot far enough to run even the start of the memory test? Or did the memory test start and then the problem of a reboot to a black screen? If the later, then you have hardware problems.

How could I have hardware problems? My computer is almost completely new (except for the hard drive, which is from my old computer), and hardly got any use as it had Windows on it.

Could this have something to do with the fact that it wouldn’t boot from the DVD drive?

You can have bad or flaky memory out of the box. Happens all the time.

Did you run the media check?

I have a NVIDIA GeForce 6200, so I’m sure I got the right driver. When it freezes, everything just stops, except for the mouse.

I’m sure that I have enough space for temp files on the root partition, as my hard drive is 280GB and it’s a fresh install.

You can have bad or flaky memory out of the box. Happens all the time.

Did you run the media check?

I ran the media check as soon as I saw your reply, and got “md5sum ok” after it ran the check.
If I burnt another copy of the LiveCD, or got an entirely different LiveCD, would that help?

Easily. The only real requisite is to have hardware. It’s like dying, the only real requisite is to be alive :).

Now, a couple months ago I assembled a new system and I couldn’t make the onboard video work. It would go nicely until X kicked in, and then fail, regardless of acpi/apm/etc settings at boot. I don’t recall if it went to level 3, froze or rebooted. There was no problem with windows XP, however.

Fortunately the shop I buy from is quite accommodating. We tested another mobo of the same model they had there (just to rule out a defective mobo) with various live-CDs and got same result, so they gave me another mobo (an Asus this time). During the test one of the tries with the Partition Magic live-CD did work, but then didn’t any more, and that was a sign of instability.

What I more or less concluded is that particular mobo implementation wasn’t compatible with linux/X/whatever, just that.

I don’t think this is your case, because of the memtest failure (which worked ok in the defective mobo), but it is an example of how new, shiny, modern hardware may fail.

The memtest program is usually a trimmed-down version of free-DOS and the test program. It only access memory and the video buffer (a very old and simple bottom-line video mode supported by all cards).

Even if a system always worked OK with windows it may fail the test, as linux tend to use all memory available, unlike windows.

If your computer reboots on starting the test I’d say that there is something very wrong with it. It has nothing to do with linux per se, as at the time of the test there’s no linux kernel running on your computer.

However, I doubt it is really the memory, unless the problem is at the very start of it, where the program tries to load itself. The only thing I can think of is trying to swap the memory or try another.

So, what exactly is/are the problem(s) from what you can tell? I can probably take the computer in to get it fixed, I just need to know what all I’m getting fixed.

I’ve never known the memtest to fail to run, So If you still don’t think you have bad memory look on the web for another memory test utility.

Memtest86+ - Advanced Memory Diagnostic Tool
but I think this is the same program that is on the CD/DVD or at least a version of it.

If you bought the machine locally take it back and ask the service tech to run a mem test on it. If you bought over the net contact their service support and ask then to advise.

brunomcl wrote:

>
> Hiim;2139899 Wrote:
>> How could I have hardware problems? My computer is almost
>> completely new (except for the hard drive, which is from my old
>> computer), and hardly got any use as it had Windows on it.
>
> Easily. The only real requisite is to have hardware. It’s like
> dying, the only real requisite is to be alive :).
>
> Now, a couple months ago I assembled a new system and I couldn’t
> make the onboard video work. It would go nicely until X kicked in,
> and then fail, regardless of acpi/apm/etc settings at boot. I
> don’t recall if it went to level 3, froze or rebooted. There was
> no problem with windows XP, however.
>
> Fortunately the shop I buy from is quite accommodating. We tested
> another mobo of the same model they had there (just to rule out a
> defective mobo) with various live-CDs and got same result, so they
> gave me another mobo (an Asus this time). During the test one of
> the tries with the Partition Magic live-CD did work, but then
> didn’t any more, and that was a sign of instability.
>
> What I more or less concluded is that particular mobo
> implementation wasn’t compatible with linux/X/whatever, just that.
>
> I don’t think this is your case, because of the memtest failure
> (which worked ok in the defective mobo), but it is an example of
> how new, shiny, modern hardware may fail.
>
> Hiim;2139899 Wrote:
>> As for the memory test, it reboots the computer as soon as I use
>> it.
>
> The memtest program is usually a trimmed-down version of free-DOS
> and the test program. It only access memory and the video buffer
> (a very old and simple bottom-line video mode supported by all
> cards).
>
> Even if a system always worked OK with windows it may fail the
> test, as linux tend to use all memory available, unlike windows.
>
> If your computer reboots on starting the test I’d say that there
> is something very wrong with it. It has nothing to do with linux
> per se, as at the time of the test there’s no linux kernel running
> on your computer.
>
> However, I doubt it is really the memory, unless the problem is at
> the very start of it, where the program tries to load itself. The
> only thing I can think of is trying to swap the memory or try
> another.
>
When I worked in field Engineering we called it"infant mortality".
with digital circuitry if its going to fail it usually fails in the
first couple of months.


Russ
| openSUSE 11.2 (2.6.31.12-18-desktop) x86_64 | KDE 4.4.1 release
225 | Intel Core 2 Dual E7200 | 4 GB RAM | GeForce 8400 GS | 320GB
Disc (2) |

The people I got the computer from (it’s a local computer shop) don’t do Linux. Will they be able to run a memtest?

Yes they will.

  • oldcpu wrote, On 03/23/2010 04:56 PM:
    > Yes they will.

Let me add that boneheaded staff doesn’t trust any installed Linux, in my experience. I’d use the memtest bootable ISO to demonstrate a memory failure.

Uwe

I’ve called the computer shop, and once I explained the problem, they said that it was probably a bad stick of RAM. Thank-you everyone for all of the help. I probably would have worn a hole in the floor from pacing had it not been for you guys.