openSUSE 11.0 Seems Sluggish

This is my first time posting in this forum and my first experience using openSUSE. I love the OS but one major problem I have with it seems to be speed. I have a solid machine HP Pavilion with 2.6 ghz AMD64 2X core processor, 4GB RAM and a 512MB NVidia GForce 8800 graphics card. I have over 1TB of HD space and I’m running Vista 32 Home Premium on a duel boot with openSUSE 11.0. Compared to a few other flavors of Linux that I’ve used on this machine in the past, in particular, Mandriva 2008, Mint, and Mepis 7, openSUSE boots slowly, responds slowly to commands, updates slowly along with slow Internet surfing, etc. Now I wonder if the fact that I’m running the i386 version instead of the AMD 64 version could be what is causing this issue. I will gladly change that if it’s the problem. Other than that, it was love at first sight with this OS. My days of distro hopping are without a doubt “OVER” if I can correct this issue. I honestly cannot see a downside to openSUSE on any level from the art work, to the feel of the design, to using YAST, etc. In fact I would say that this is the OS that would finally allow me to dump Windows, with complete confidence, and know that I can get all of my work done without worry. Any help you can provide will be much appreciated and I’ll give you any info that you feel would help in solving the problem. Thank you!

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You may find some interesting points on sluggish Internet experiences in
other threads… possibly in the .network-internet sibling to this
forum. Some of the things I recall include disabling IPv6 along with
some tweaking of FF3. Anyway, those may help a little on that front.
Otherwise there are quite a few tweaks you can make to your box in
general. For example you can enable ‘noatime’ and ‘nodiratime’ on
filesystems so you decrease the amount of hard drive work you have
immediately which is great. This is done by adding ‘noatime’ and/or
‘nodiratime’ to the options column (fourth) of /etc/fstab for your
partitions (not swap, and nothing virtual… just the /dev/whatever
stuff that is for a real drive) and rebooting or remounting the volumes.
You can also uninstall default software, disable unnecessary services,
etc. I would also recommend going to 64-bit unless you have a reason to
do otherwise. I’ve been using it exclusively for the better part of a
year now on my primary box (this one) and haven’t regretted it yet (and
I’m not even on the 11 codebase).

Good luck.

stephentony wrote:
> This is my first time posting in this forum and my first experience
> using openSUSE. I love the OS but one major problem I have with it seems
> to be speed. I have a solid machine HP Pavilion with 2.6 ghz AMD64 2X
> core processor, 4GB RAM and a 512MB NVidia GForce 8800 graphics card. I
> have over 1TB of HD space and I’m running Vista 32 Home Premium on a
> duel boot with openSUSE 11.0. Compared to a few other flavors of Linux
> that I’ve used on this machine in the past, in particular, Mandriva
> 2008, Mint, and Mepis 7, openSUSE boots slowly, responds slowly to
> commands, updates slowly along with slow Internet surfing, etc. Now I
> wonder if the fact that I’m running the i386 version instead of the AMD
> 64 version could be what is causing this issue. I will gladly change
> that if it’s the problem. Other than that, it was love at first sight
> with this OS. My days of distro hopping are without a doubt “OVER” if I
> can correct this issue. I honestly cannot see a downside to openSUSE on
> any level from the art work, to the feel of the design, to using YAST,
> etc. In fact I would say that this is the OS that would finally allow me
> to dump Windows, with complete confidence, and know that I can get all
> of my work done without worry. Any help you can provide will be much
> appreciated and I’ll give you any info that you feel would help in
> solving the problem. Thank you!
>
>
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Hi. I likewise think that SuSE (along with Mandriva, Ubuntu and a bunch of other distros) has finally reached the point where the average user can make the great jump and defect - or is it defecate? - Redmond, along with its sick concept of “software patents”, for good. And the greatness of it is that the more users make the jump, the better linux will become, the more hardware vendors will provide drivers for their equipment, the greater the push toward excellence will be, until hopefully at some point the great corporations which are only in it for the money, will not be able to keep the pace anymore and will revert to producing corks, toothpicks and toilet paper.:stuck_out_tongue:
As for the sluggishness of your system: have you measured any differences between various distros? Are there only perceived differences, or real ones? What filesystem have you chosen for your partition? For comparison sake: my dual-core laptop boots to the SuSE login screen in roughly 1 minute and I too perceive this as a little slowish.

It’s definitely not normal for a machine like yours to be slow with SuSE. I also recommend disabling IPv6 (systemwide: YaST → System → /etc/sysconfig-Editor → Firewall → SuSEfirewall2 → “FW_IPv6”, set that to “drop”; Firefox: filter ‘about:config’ with ‘ipv6’ and set disabling of ipv6 to ‘true’ by doubleclicking the entry), yet there must be something else, so let’s try to narrow that down a bit.

• Do you use KDE4? I have an old card (GeForce 4 Ti) that works fine, but I read that those NVidias using the latest (non-legacy)-drivers still have issues with KDE4. You could stay with KDE3 then (KDE4 is not perfect yet anyway) until the NVidia-team woke up.

• Are there special application which run slow or is it a general slowishness which lasts the whole session? I would watch ‘top’ for a while, maybe a service is thwarting your system, like…

•… some sort of desktop-search engine like Beagle or Strigi. They cause problems on some systems when building their database.

• Check your Hardware, especially your HDs (bad blocks, physical damage etc.) by using the respective tool from your HDs manufacturer (Hitachis “Drive Fitness Test” is known to be able to check a wide variety of disks, not only Hitachis and IBMs, try that one if you can’t find one for your HD). RAM should also be checked by using ‘memtest’ for some hours (let it run overnight).

A 64bit-Version will not speed up your system, it should run fine and fast with 32bit as well. You should use a pae-kernel, though (see ‘uname -a’ to check that) so your system is able to adress all of your 4GB RAM.

There must be something wrong which can not simply be ‘tweaked’. I have a computer with 1GB RAM and an Athlon XP 1600+, and SuSE runs smooth over here.