Only 20 GB?

On Sat, 03 Jul 2010 08:36:03 +0000, hcvv wrote for a reply:

> Chill Out;2184155 Wrote:
>>
>> I don’t think that’s correct. She would need to grab the area
>> encompassing /home then drag it before /home or adjust the after to 0.
>>
>>
>> Code:
>> -------------
>> |—Swap—|=======/=======| |-------/home-------|
>> |—Swap—|=======/===========|-------/home-------|
>>
>> -------------
>>
>>
> It may be bcause the lay-out is broken because you are apparently using
> an interface to the forums that spoiles the lay-out, but I do not
> understand anything of this.
>
> I admit that my schema is not exactly as the OP’s because Swap is on a
> different disk alltogether. But according to the info in post #10, they
> have / on sdc1 (disk addresses 1-2611) and /home on sdc2 (2612-60801
> wich is the end of the disk). I do not know ewere you find that hole
> between / and /home in your first line. I also do not understand what
> you mean by “to grab the area encompassing /home then drag it before
> /home or adjust the after to 0”. Sorry, we seem to use different words
> for the same thing or whatever?

The OP layouts were terrible. Your schema seemed to show unused space on
the one HD.

I suggested the OP using YaST Partitioner to move that unused space
adjacent to / (root) and before /home. She could do that by drag the
edges of /home to the end and away from / (root), to put the unused space
between them, then extending / (root) to include the unused space. Or
use the numerical counter to do the same.

In another post I noted the OP has 75G unused space not mounted on /dev/
sda they can use.


Chillingout@opensuse.forum

My schema is all about sdc and shows the different steps that should be taken when one wants to shift the boundary between / and /home. I do not know if you can see those schemas as they are on the Web interface. Maybe they are confusing when not in fixed font.
As I said earlier the swap partition there is in fact not on sdc, but that does not change the steps to be taken to do the move.

The disks sda and sdb never were taken into consideration. The OP did not talk much about them and they were of no importance for his/her problem. The only thing is that the swap partition is on one of them, but again the size or place of the swap partition was never part of the discussion.

And as the OP is satsfied with the outcome of the discussion (/ is most probably big enough), I do not think any further posting is of much use.

On Sat, 03 Jul 2010 18:56:02 +0000, hcvv wrote for a reply:

> My shcema is all about sdc and shows the different steps that should be
> taken when one wants th shift the boundary between / and /home. I do not
> know if you can see those schemas as they are on the Web interface.
> Maybe they are confusing when not in fixed font. As I said earlier the
> swap partition there is in fact not on sdc, but that does not change the
> steps to be taken to do the move.
>
> The disks sda and sdb never were taken into consideration. The OP did
> not talk much about them and they were of no importance for his/her
> problem. The only thing is that the swap partition is on one of them,
> but again the size or place of the swap partition was never part of the
> discussion.
>
> And as the OP is satsfied with the outcome of the discussion (/ is most
> probably big enough), I do not think any further posting is of much use.

My discussion was related to your schema which as I stated indicate
unused space at the end and how to use that space.

IIRC, the OP complained about running out of space for her / partition
which happened to be on sdc. I looked for solutions beyond a slice on
sdc for additional free space.

Yep, haven’t seen a reply post from the OP so consider it done.


Chillingout@opensuse.forum

Thanks guys!
I’ll learn to live with the 20 Gig space.

I do have a question though:
When I have to upgrade from 11.2 to whatever, could I do as you suggested (delete the /home partition, make / larger, then add in /home again to take over the rest of the drive) without losing what is already on my /home partition or would it overwrite it with a new, empty /home?

If you want to shift /home that contains data, you have to use something like gparted, which carefully moves the blocks in the partition in the desired direction. However you should still take a backup of /home in case something goes pear-shaped, e.g. power failing during the shift. In fact everyone should take regular backups of their files, in case lots of pear-shape events happen around their houses. And as we all know, Murphy was a pear orchardist.

Murphy was a pear orchardist

ROFL! that was funny! But yeah, stuff happens.

On Mon, 05 Jul 2010 14:56:04 +0000, gymnart wrote for a reply:

> Thanks guys!
> I’ll learn to live with the 20 Gig space.
>
> I do have a question though:
> When I have to upgrade from 11.2 to whatever, could I do as you
> suggested (delete the /home partition, make / larger, then add in /home
> again to take over the rest of the drive) without losing what is already
> on my /home partition or would it overwrite it with a new, empty /home?

First, you should backup your system especially your /home and personal
data. Everyone has a favorite backup from Seagate DiscWizard for making
a system image, or you can you use the YaST System Backup.

The sequence you suggest: del /home wipes out /home and unless you have a
backup to restore data on /home would be gone. I think you should follow
the sequence described by Ken Yap. Use either Gparted LiveCD or YaST
Partition to shrink /home making unallocated space adjacent to / (root).
Then expand / (root) to include that space. You can only extend
partitions onto adjacent free or unallocated space, which is why you move
blocks in the partitioner.

Gparted has excellent graphic documentation on resizing partitions.

http://gparted.sourceforge.net/larry/resize/resizing.htm

Many filesystems are supported by Gparted and YaST Partition.


Chillingout@opensuse.forum

On Mon, 05 Jul 2010 14:56:04 +0000, gymnart wrote for a reply:

> Thanks guys!
> I’ll learn to live with the 20 Gig space.
>
> I do have a question though:
> When I have to upgrade from 11.2 to whatever, could I do as you
> suggested (delete the /home partition, make / larger, then add in /home
> again to take over the rest of the drive) without losing what is already
> on my /home partition or would it overwrite it with a new, empty /home?

Have you tried:

Code:

mkdir /home/userid/atest
sudo mount -t ext3 /dev/sda2 /home/userid/atest -o ro,defaults

Or

Code:

mkdir /home/userid/atest
sudo mount -t ext4 /dev/sda2 /home/userid/atest -o ro,defaults

I think those are correct mount instruction depending on filesystem to
mount /dev/sda2 read only.

I think /dev/sda is a 80Gb drive only mounting /dev/sda1 as a 1Gb SWAP
Code:

fdisk /dev/sda -l

look for /dev/sda2

/dev/sda2 * 129 9729 77120032+ 83 Linux


Chillingout@opensuse.forum

How do you use the YaST System Backup? Is there a tutorial around somewhere?
I know it’s one thing to make the backup, but how do you use it to restore your stuff? I’m accustomed to Windows’ backup (where it puts a backup somewhere on your hd and you just select the date you want to restore to and voila! Your system is back to the way it was before you messed things up).

Backups is a knowledge. You should first contemplate why you make backups. What do you want to be able to restore when need arises. This can be very different and of course your needs may include several goals. To name a few
. System restore after a disk failure;
. Restore of a file one of your end-users deleted by accident last week.
. Restore of a database as it was on 1 januari last year because the income tax wants to know something (this is more archiving then backup).
. etc.

I do not know what Windows offers. Never used it.

I think, but I am not certain, that the YaST backup is more of the complete system backup/restore type. I do not know how good it is.

My personal (!) method is making every week a backup of all in /home (user data of a few users), /etc (system configuration data, /srv (web-site). I keep a cycle of 10 of those backups. This allows me to restore until about 10 weeks ago. It also allows me on a disk failure to install the system and use the backup in /etc either to look at it to see how something was configured, or even copy some files from it. I also have a seperate documentation about the systems that is made each week (by scripts) and copied with the backup.

Another thing to contemplate is where you put the backups. Seperate media? In house or somewhere else? I have a seperate (small, text only install) system to backup to, but when the house is on fire …

All depends on your needs. And I am sure that a wealth of contradictory and usefull information will come forward once ppl get the air of the fact that this thread now is about backup. And yes, you should have started a new thread with this new question, because only the few that follow this thread will see your change of subject.
.

Ok, I shall make that another subject then.
Thanks for your answer though. :smiley: