Nvidia & tumbleweed

**Hey, I would like to know if I go from 13.1 to tumbleweed, do I need to install my nvidia geforce 210 driver the hard way, or the driver given by the opensuse website will automatically be updated? I like 13.1, but I want the new features so I intend to change to tumbleweed. The problem is that I use my pc for gaming and working, and I need the proprietary driver to work correctly… **

Yes.

or the driver given by the opensuse website will automatically be updated?

No.

I like 13.1, but I want the new features so I intend to change to tumbleweed. The problem is that I use my pc for gaming and working, and I need the proprietary driver to work correctly…

Well, using Tumbleweed is not really recommended if you really on 3rd party drivers.
From the Tumbleweed Portal:

Due to the Linux kernel being updated very frequently, users who rely on proprietary graphic drivers should not use the Tumbleweed repository unless they are familiar with updating these drivers from source on their own. See articles NVIDIA and ATI, section “The hard way”, for how to do this if you are interested.

When you should keep staying at stable release
At this point there is no guarantee to have all additional modules available in the stable release like for Vmware or Virtualbox. And while the Packman Tumbleweed Essential repository attempts to deliver them there is no guarantee they will always succeed due to the incompatibilities with the quickly advancing Linux Kernel. The problems with proprietary Graphics drivers are similar and there is no guarantee they will work tomorrow, even if they do today. If you don’t know how to compile your own additional kernel modules and you don’t wish to learn or keep a very close eye on what is being updated, please don’t use Tumbleweed.

Special Concerns

  • Third Party Drivers

If you have 3rd party kernel modules, Greg KH (the primary Tumbleweed maintainer) STRONGLY suggests that you not use Tumbleweed. Seriously, it’s not worth the pain and extra work, unless you really want to do it.

And if you do do it, then again, you are on your own, sorry.

It is of course possible, but you should know what you are doing. Probably use DKMS to not have to reinstall the driver after every kernel update.
And you should be aware of possible problems. If the kernel gets updated to a new major version, it might take some time until the new kernel is supported by nvidia.

If you do decide to use Tumbleweed, I’d suggest to wait a few weeks until 13.2 is the base though. You will spare yourself from a lot of possible trouble (and one system upgrade) that way.
You can of course just upgrade to 13.2 when it is released (which you will do automatically anyway when using Tumbleweed, the first weeks at least Tumbleweed will probably provide nothing at all in addition to 13.2). This has all the new stuff as well.

Another option is Factory of course. This is a real rolling distribution (unlike Tumbleweed which only updates selected packages on top of the stable distribution), and should be quite stable nowadays.
The nvidia driver “problems” are the same though.

OTOH, you can always add selected OBS repos to your (stable) system to update specific things to their latest versions. That’s what I prefer to do.
It’s a bit like building your own Tumbleweed… :wink:

neat! thanks for the detailed feedback! indeed i have no will to build my own kernel ando through all that. I’m but a psychology student, fascinated by technology, and a fan of opensuse since 2007 (was my first distro, followed by caixa mágica).
I’ll stay with 13.1 but i have this question, is the upgrade to 13.2 safe? or will it break my Nvidia driver?

Well, you don’t have to build your own kernel, you’ll get a new one automatically by Tumbleweed every so often.
But you would have to rebuild the nvidia kernel module every time there is an update to the kernel.
DKMS can do that automatically for you, but there’s no guarantee that the driver will work immediately when a new kernel comes out.

I’ll stay with 13.1 but i have this question, is the upgrade to 13.2 safe? or will it break my Nvidia driver?

It should be safe. (well, there’s always something that can go wrong… :wink: )
Especially if you wait until the nvidia driver is available for 13.2 in the official nvidia repo.

Then you basically have two ways to upgrade, online in the running system, or offline by booting from an installation medium.
The latter one is a bit safer, the first one has the advantage that you can upgrade everything, also things from non-standard repos, in one go including the nvidia driver (there is a way to add extra repos for the installation when booting from the installation medium, but it’s not that obvious).
See here for more detailed instructions, and further tips:
https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:System_upgrade
[noparse]https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Offline_upgrade[/noparse]

Why is it that I can install this with one-click: openSUSE Software and not have to recompile or go through a complicated process and it works great with tumbleweed then? Am i missing some functionality in using it? I’ve got a Lenovo Y500 with dual gt650m nvidia cards SLI’d and it works like a beauty for me.

That package just downloads the nvidia driver from nvidia’s server and installs it for you.
I.e. it does the same “complicated process” that you would have to do otherwise, which is not at all complicated:
download the .run installer from nvidia’s homepage/server and execute it to install the driver (including compiling the kernel module).

That package also sets up dkms, so the kernel module gets recompiled automatically after a kernel update.

But if you installed the one from the Bumblebee repo, it should not work at all AFAIK.
It installs the driver in a way that the system doesn’t see it, but Bumblebee can use it, IIANM.

And there’s still the possible problem that nvidia driver might not work for a while when a newer kernel (3.18 or 3.19) is released, because it might take nvidia some time to add support.

Am i missing some functionality in using it? I’ve got a Lenovo Y500 with dual gt650m nvidia cards SLI’d and it works like a beauty for me.

Well, which package did you install exactly?
Did you install Bumblebee as well? Is this an Optimus system?

Are you actually using the nvidia driver?

glxinfo | grep render

(you probably have to install Mesa-demo-x though for that to produce any output.

I simply installed the tumbleweed 3.43 version at the link i provided and that’s all. Rebooted and I’m find. No idea what an optimus system is, it’s a lenovo y500 so that’s all I am aware of.

I thought so.
But for Tumbleweed I only see packages from the Bumblebee project.
As mentioned, I was of the impression those only work in combination with Bumblebee, maybe I was wrong.

And I suppose you mean 343.xx, there is no 3.43 version of the nvidia driver… :wink:

So as I wrote, this package downloads the .run installer from nvidia and executes it. Something which you would have to do yourself otherwise.
Again, this is not a “complicated process” (those were your words, not mine), just download the .run file and execute it (you probably have to prevent nouveau from loading as well, via “nomodeset” or a blacklist file, but maybe this is even created by nvidia’s installer).

The package additionally sets up DKMS to automatically recompile the kernel module after kernel updates, so you don’t have to manually reinstall it in that case.

And still, this could break any time (when a new kernel is released and nvidia does not work with it yet at the time it enters Tumbleweed), hence the warning.

No idea what an optimus system is, it’s a lenovo y500 so that’s all I am aware of.

Optimus is a system with hybrid intel and nvidia graphics. You need Bumblebee to switch between them.