nvidia: setting monitor resolution - 11.3 RC2

I have a Medion 19 inch monitor which is capable of 1280x1024 but the most the monitor list gives is 1024X768.
I have installed the nvidia drivers and tried the suggestions in this thread: Found A newbie friendly way for nvidia & nouveau but I can’t get it to change.
Changing the monitor settings in 50-monitors.conf doesn’t work.

Where do you set up the new monitor and screen definitions in the latest version using xorg.d?

In the old xorg.conf settings, you could set the monitor definitions for resolution and sync sppeds, but setting them in the monitors and screen sections of 11.3 doesn’t work.
You could specify the vesa display resolution for your monitor in previous releases but not in 11.3.

How is the monitor connected (VGA, DVI cable)? Can you post your 50-monitors.conf contents here? Open a terminal and type

xrandr

What is reported? This might signal an EDID issue. It might be worth looking at your Xorg.0.log file for clues too.

Where do you set up the new monitor and screen definitions in the latest version using xorg.d?

That’s a good question. (I suspect that when things go wrong, manual editing is required at this stage).

For my OpenSuse 11.1 settings I finally got results using


Section "Monitor"
  Option       "CalcAlgorithm" "XServerPool"
  DisplaySize  474 296
  HorizSync    30-80
  Identifier   "Monitor[0]"
  ModelName    "1680X1050@60HZ"
  Option       "DPMS"
  **Option       "PreferredMode" "1680x1050"**
  VendorName   "--> LCD"
  VertRefresh  50-75
  UseModes     "Modes[0]"
EndSection

deano:
xrandr is:

Screen 0: minimum 320 x 240, current 1024 x 768, maximum 1024 x 768
default connected 1024x768+0+0 0mm x 0mm
1024x768 50.0*
800x600 51.0 52.0 53.0
640x480 54.0
512x384 55.0
400x300 56.0 57.0 58.0
320x240 59.0

which is as expected, since 1024x768 is the max resolution I can get.

50-monitors.conf is:

Section “Monitor”
Identifier “Monitor0”
VendorName “Unknown”
ModelName “CRT-0”
HorizSync 28.0 - 55.0
VertRefresh 43.0 - 72.0
Option “DPMS”
EndSection
Section “Device”
Identifier “Device0”
Driver “nvidia” #“vesa” #Choose the driver used for this monitor
EndSection

Section “Screen”
Identifier “Screen0” #Collapse Monitor and Device section to Screen #section
Device “Device0”
Monitor “Monitor0”
DefaultDepth 24 #Choose the depth (16||24)
SubSection “Display”
Depth 24
Modes “1280x1024_60.00” #Choose the resolution

So, getting back to my original question, where do you set the video modes in 11.3, since xorg.conf is no longer valid?

@ tararpharazon
Thanks, but I don’t have a problem on distros that use the conventional xorg.conf settings, only with 11.3’s new xorg.d configuration - xorg.conf is no longer valid or read.

So, getting back to my original question, where do you set the video modes in 11.3, since xorg.conf is no longer valid?

@ tararpharazon
Thanks, but I don’t have a problem on distros that use the conventional xorg.conf settings, only with 11.3’s new xorg.d configuration - xorg.conf is no longer valid or read.

No, thats not entirely true. AFAIU, xorg.conf files are still valid if present, so ‘Xorg -configure’ can still be uesd for example to generate a basic xorg.conf file.

Anyway, I think a manual edit of 50-monitors.conf might work for you. In particular, the horizontal sync value needs to be increased in order for 1280x1024 @ 60Hz to work for example:

gtf 1280 1024 60

# 1280x1024 @ 60Hz (GTF) hsync: 63.60 kHz; pclk: 108.8 Mhz
ModeLine "1280x1024" 108.88  1280 1360 1496 1712 1024 1025 1028 1060 +Hsync +Vsync

So your 50-monitors.conf would need to be edited (as root) like this:

Section "Monitor"
Identifier "Monitor0"
VendorName "Unknown"
ModelName "CRT-0"
HorizSync 28.0 - 65.0
VertRefresh 43.0 - 72.0
Option "DPMS"
EndSection
Section "Device"
Identifier "Device0"
Driver "nvidia" #"vesa" #Choose the driver used for this monitor
EndSection
.
.
.

A useful reference:

http://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Xorg

I tried this and I get a 1280 display but with what looks like 800x600 resolution. I then have to move around the edges to see each bit of the screen.



--------------------------------
|      1024x1024                   |
|                                             |
|         ************                |
|         *    Monitor *              |
|         *     shown *              |
|         *                  *             |
|         *                  *             |
|          ***********                |
|                                           | 
--------------------------------

I suppose you need to use the same identifiers found in 50-screen.conf like this:

Section “Screen”
Identifier “Default Screen”

Device “Default Device”

Doesn’t help for radeon/radeonhd drivers; use magic in

50-device.conf instead

Monitor “Default Monitor”

EndSection

If you used deano_ferraro’s code for 50-screen.conf it needed changes from CRT-0 to LCD.
Did you use a LCD modeline but described the monitor as a CRT? Correct sync and refresh cycles?

After much playing around, I got it working.

@ tararpharazon
It seems you are right about the old xorg.conf file being used.
I discovered by accident that if I copied my 11.2 xorg.conf file to /etc/X11 and started again with no entries in the 50-monitors.conf, everything works fine after a reboot. (I did the copy while running 11.2, and then booted to 11.3.)

The default xorg.conf file that is created on installation apperently messes things up when you try to set up the 50-monitors.conf file. …I’ll check this later and report back.

It seems that the absence of sax2 as a config tool makes it more difficult to set things up. Also, the xorg.conf file is read by default and the xorg.d contents only used in the absence of an xorg.conf file.

After much playing around, I got it working.

Thanks for the update.

It seems that the absence of sax2 as a config tool makes it more difficult to set things up. Also, the xorg.conf file is read by default and the xorg.d contents only used in the absence of an xorg.conf file.

Yes, thats correct. I remember a similar discussion here.

Even for openSUSE 11.3, ‘Xorg -configure’ can still be used to generate a legacy xorg.conf file (for cases where its needed) as explained in oldcpu’s guide. It is definitely a sensible idea to keep working xorg.conf files from previous installation version just in case they’re needed again.

Yes, thats correct. I remember a similar discussion here.

Even for openSUSE 11.3, 'Xorg -configure' can still be used to generate a legacy xorg.conf file (for cases where its needed) as explained in oldcpu's guide. It is definitely a sensible idea to keep working xorg.conf files from previous installation version just in case they’re needed again.

I looked at all the threads before posting, so I did read it. The links to sax2 have been removed from the repo and sax won’t compile under 11.3, so I gave up on sax2.

The problem with 11.3 though comes with new users that don’t have a working (open)SuSE distro to copy the relevant xorg.conf settings from. In it’s present state, it won’t be easy for them.
Also we need some links to the relevant xorg documentation listing what goes where. The x.org site doesn’t have it and I don’t think there are any openSuSE docs for it yet.
Will play around on my 11.3 install later and try removing/renaming the xorg.conf file and trying to set it up using the xorg.conf.d files.

I confess I did not like a lot of the advice that thread, because it was incomplete in terms of the guidance provided. The guidance would work for some hardware, and not other hardware. Hence anyone following the thread could be confused.

I wrote a guide here SDB:Configuring graphics cards - openSUSE, which I believe is fairly complete, but I guess it is too complex, as users are ignoring it and writing their own guides.

@oldcpu
I never found that guide, so I haven’t read it. Is it recent, because it didn’t come up on any of the searches yesterday?

As a consolation, I did some hdd swapping and got my winXP-64 bit install going on a difernent pc which has an older radeon card and had to eventually resort to an older radeon catalyst driver to get it working. So it’s not only linux that has problems with proprietary drivers.
Seems like the lifespan of computer hardware has dramatically shortened lately, when for most non-gaming users old hardware is more than adaquate.
… Remember the old days when you installed linux only on older hardware because the driver support wasn’t there and you knew the exact irq dma address for each piece of hardware? Now it seems that linux is made for the latest hardware as well.

As an update:
I deleted/renamed the xorg.conf file and tried setting the monitor in the xorg.d/50-monitors.conf, but x doesn’t start.
So despite the fact that xorg.conf is to be depricated, it is still needed.

Glad to hear you got it working.

I confess to ignoring 11.3 pre-release because I haven’t fully explored 11.2 (or 11.1 for that matter) and wouldn’t have known about the xorg.conf.d files or Xorg moving to kernel based modules.

Seems like opensuse is trying to become too bleeding edge which will put a lot of new users off. I think the conservative approach is best - rather be a good relible all round distro that will give all users a chance for the bleeding edge in separate repo.
I like suse for the yast extra tools that make things like ldap and nfs easy and would hate to see it go the way of Mnadrake did in becoming too bleeding edge.
11.1/11.2 are good, solid versions. Let’s hope 11.3 turns out to be the same.

Oops, are you getting spoiled??? I thought OpenSuse was the bleeding edge for SLED ?? Like Fedora is the bleeding edge for RHEL?? Of those 2 Fedora really dripped blood, OpenSuse just has dried blood scars. Exceptions like PulseAudio con all the distro developers.

I’m mostly waiting for the 11.3 release notes and others like yourself to d/l and install 11.3 before I commit to upgrading my Box #1 to OS 11.3. ;):slight_smile:

Ah, but like many of us older users, we don’t necessarily run the latest hardware and want a system that runs the way we want. The ‘wow’ factor of new software isn’t the same for us anymore.
I still use sled11 on my main workstation because it is solid and I don’t have to re-install every few months. Major version updates are different.
I generally use opensuse on my netbook because it works better.

whych wrote:

> Ah, but like many of us older users, we don’t necessarily run the
> latest hardware and want a system that runs the way we want. The ‘wow’
> factor of new software isn’t the same for us anymore.
> I still use sled11 on my main workstation because it is solid and I
> don’t have to re-install every few months. Major version updates are
> different.
> I generally use opensuse on my netbook because it works better.

I could live with the complete autoconfig move if - big IF - the damned
system would fail gracefully and offer the opportunity to make manual
tweaks when the autoconfig process find ANY error/problem. As it is now,
your first warning is a failed boot/login with no clue as to the problem
(unless you’ve been there before) :wink:


Will Honea

The guide is recent. Less than a month old. I wrote it because an action was placed on me to write such a guide after deletion of the sax2 wizard in 11.3 (that action was placed on me :cry: because I wrote a bug report about sax2 being deleted. … :\ . … that will teach me for being a bit too proactive). lol!

And it has bounced around to a couple of different locations because our entire openSUSE wiki are in transition.

You are correct IMHO that for some users the automatic configuration of Xorg will not work, and one will have to either create a custom xorg.conf (without the sax2 wizard) or hand edit the /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/ files … and our internal openSUSE documentation on this is still a bit weak. Some other distros have advice here, but I don’t know enough about it to be able to pick and choose items of the other distro guides and create our own detailed guide (for editing /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/ directory files).

… what puzzles me, is HOW do we get word out to our membership to keep a backup copy of their xorg.conf when migrating from an old openSUSE to the new 11.3 ?? Of course one should do that as a matter of course, but I am willing to bet most of our users simply dispense with that common sense backup approach.