No network after installing SUSE 13.2 from DVD

Hi, I just installed SUSE 13.2 from DVD on a desktop connected to a Fritzbox. I had no network after the installation. When I tried to ping my other desktop I got “connect: Network is unreachable”. ifconfig showed an inet6 address, but no inet address (other than the loopback address). “Yast/Network Services” settings were as close as possible to the settings of SUSE 13.1 on my other desktop. Prominent difference: Wicked Service. When I switched from DHCP to a static network address, I could ping my other machine and access the router using its IP address, but I still didn’t have internet. I enabled DHCP again. I disabled IPv6 and rebooted. Didn’t make a difference. Out of ideas, I decided to follow the steps described in section 1.2 of the release notes, even though I have no laptop, I"m not using a wireless connection, and I did NOT upgrade an existing installation. Surprise!! I can access the network now.
I remember that I was asked something about the network very early in the installation process. That surprised me, as I didn’t remember a similar question from the SUSE 13.1 installation just 2 months ago.
Is this a known problem? Did I do something wrong during the installation?

Thanks, Stephan

On Wed, 31 Dec 2014 18:56:03 +0000, stephanhh wrote:

> Hi, I just installed SUSE 13.2 from DVD on a desktop connected to a
> Fritzbox. I had no network after the installation. When I tried to ping
> my other desktop I got “connect: Network is unreachable”. ifconfig
> showed an inet6 address, but no inet address (other than the loopback
> address). “Yast/Network Services” settings were as close as possible to
> the settings of SUSE 13.1 on my other desktop. Prominent difference:
> Wicked Service. When I switched from DHCP to a static network address, I
> could ping my other machine and access the router using its IP address,
> but I still didn’t have internet. I enabled DHCP again. I disabled IPv6
> and rebooted. Didn’t make a difference. Out of ideas, I decided to
> follow the steps described in section 1.2 of the release notes, even
> though I have no laptop, I"m not using a wireless connection, and I did
> NOT upgrade an existing installation. Surprise!! I can access the
> network now.
> I remember that I was asked something about the network very early in
> the installation process. That surprised me, as I didn’t remember a
> similar question from the SUSE 13.1 installation just 2 months ago.
> Is this a known problem? Did I do something wrong during the
> installation?

What kind of network card is in the system, and did you do a reboot after
the installation was completed?

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

When I switched from DHCP to a static network address, I could ping my other machine and access the router using its IP address, but I still didn’t have internet

The network was “working” locally, but the internet couldn’t be “found”. Perhaps because when set to fixed IP one needs also for tell the network where the router is and where the Name Servers are. That’s all found in Yast ==> Network devices ==> Network settings ==> Hostname/DNS (for name servers e.g. 8.8.8.8 + 8.8.4.4) and Routing (e.g. 10.10.10.1 or whatever is your gateway/router)

Just a passing thought

I had that
A reboot did it

If you using static ip you must use network manager to connect to the internet. I’ve the same problem too when I use wicked service. Only use wicked service to set the internet manually :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=hendersj;2686387]On Wed, 31 Dec 2014 18:56:03 +0000, stephanhh wrote:

>What kind of network card is in the system, and did you do a reboot after
>the installation was completed?

It’s a RTL8111/8168. It worked fine with SUSE 11 and Fedora (and it works now with network manager). I did reboot after installation. In fact, I rebooted several times, whenever yast told me that a change is only effective after reboot. When I switched off support for IPv6, for example, and when I switched it back on.

Using network manager instead of wicked service solved the problem. So let me rephrase my question: what could be the reason wicket service doesn’t work?
My router doesn’t support IPv6. Is it possible to accidentally switch off IPv4 support during the installation? I’m asking because I got an inet6 address when I rebooted after installation, but no inet address.

Thanks, Stephan

On Fri, 02 Jan 2015 11:26:02 +0000, stephanhh wrote:

> hendersj;2686387 Wrote:
>> On Wed, 31 Dec 2014 18:56:03 +0000, stephanhh wrote:
>>
>>
>> >What kind of network card is in the system, and did you do a reboot
>> after
>> >the installation was completed?
>>
>> It’s a RTL8111/8168. It worked fine with SUSE 11 and Fedora (and it
>> works now with network manager). I did reboot after installation. In
>> fact, I rebooted several times, whenever yast told me that a change is
>> only effective after reboot. When I switched off support for IPv6, for
>> example, and when I switched it back on.
>>
>> Using network manager instead of wicked service solved the problem. So
>> let me rephrase my question: what could be the reason wicket service
>> doesn’t work?
>> My router doesn’t support IPv6. Is it possible to accidentally switch
>> off IPv4 support during the installation? I’m asking because I got an
>> inet6 address when I rebooted after installation, but no inet address.
>>
>> Thanks, Stephan

Don’t know why this would be happening, but regarding IPv6, if your
router doesn’t support it, you should leave it switched off.

IPv4 isn’t optional. IPv6 addresses are more closely bound to the
network card, so it’s not surprising that you got one assigned even with
no support in the router.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C