Newb - virtualbox failed during 13.1 install

Hello, I’m new to OpenSuse. I noticed a line when installing that something failed with Virtualbox.

How do I troubleshoot?

Thanks,
Mike

Please describe the problem in more detail.

When did you notice the line?
Did you install openSUSE inside VirtualBox or on real hardware?
From which installation medium did you install? (full DVD, KDE/GNOME Live, Netinstall-ISO)

Do you actually have any problem, or did you just see some message about VirtualBox?
Could be that the VirtualBox guest additions failed to start, but that’s normal on real hardware.
When you install from a Live ISO, they get installed as well.
To get rid of that message, just enter YaST->Software Management, search for “virtualbox” and uninstall all packages found.

Background:
The LiveISOs do contain the VirtualBox guest additions so that they run better inside VirtualBox.
When you install from a LiveISO, just the whole content of the ISO is copied to your hard disk. So the guest additions will be there as well then although they are useless.
But as I said already, they don’t cause problems either, they just print a message that they couldn’t start.

Thanks for the quick reply.

I noticed message when installing on real hardware from a live ISO dvd (13.1 KDE). Unfortunately I wasn’t paying close attention. I noticed a line with the words “Virtualbox” and “failed”.

I don’t really know if I have a problem or not. I thought VB was an included application so I expected to see it in the menu, but I didn’t.

The computer is an older dual core intel that had XP. I intend to run XP in VB.

Then that’s definitely the “Virtualbox guest additions” that fail to start because you are not running inside VirtualBox.
Either ignore that message, or uninstall the packages “virtualbox-guest-kmp-desktop”, “virtualbox-guest-tools” and “virtualbox-guest-x11”.
They are useless on real hardware anyway.

For running VirtualBox on your openSUSE system you would need the “virtualbox-host-kmp” package (and virtualbox and virtualbox-qt).

I don’t really know if I have a problem or not. I thought VB was an included application so I expected to see it in the menu, but I didn’t.

Yes, VirtualBox is indeed included, but it is not installed by default.

VB is included in the main repo, its not the full PUEL version with e.g USB support, but it’s not installed by default. You can install it using YaST Software Management.

For installing Oracle’s full PUEL version (free), I use their repo (see the VirtualBox website for installation instructions and VB documentation).

openSUSE’s version does have USB support, but only USB 1.1.

For USB2 support (and a few other additional features as well) you have to download the extension pack (that is the PUEL part) from virtualbox.org.
But it’s the same with Oracle’s version AFAIK. Or does this include the extension pack already? The homepage/documentation would suggest otherwise.

From Chapter 1. First Steps :

Starting with version 4.0, VirtualBox is split into several components.

  1. The base package consists of all open-source components and is licensed under the GNU General Public License V2.
  1. Additional extension packs can be downloaded which extend the functionality of the VirtualBox base package. Currently, Oracle provides the one extension pack, which can be found athttp://www.virtualbox.org and provides the following added functionality:

[LIST=1]

  1. The virtual USB 2.0 (EHCI) device; see Section 3.10.1, “USB settings”.
  1. VirtualBox Remote Desktop Protocol (VRDP) support; see Section 7.1, “Remote display (VRDP support)”.
  1. Host webcam passthrough; see chapter Section 9.7.1, “Using a host webcam in the guest”.
  1. Intel PXE boot ROM.
  1. Experimental support for PCI passthrough on Linux hosts; see Section 9.6, “PCI passthrough”.

[/LIST]

The base package should be the same regardless whether you use openSUSE´s or Oracle’s version.

Trivial pursuits. lol!

What do you mean with that?

You falsely claimed that openSUSE’s packages have no USB support:

True is, that both (openSUSE’s and Oracle’s) packages are the same in this regard.
Also Oracle’s package only has USB 1.1 support and is not “the full PUEL version”.

You have to install the Extension Pack to gain USB2 support (and the rest of the stuff not included in the GPL version), but that’s the same no matter whether you install openSUSE’s or Oracle’s version (I just looked at that package :wink: ).
And the Extension Pack (the “full PUEL version”) is not available in any repo, not even in Oracle’s. You have to download it from the website.

I just wanted to clarify that.

Please watch your language in accusing people of false claims! Correcting a statement is one thing, but making accusations about “false claims” is something else entirely.

I would have thought that most users (not all) would be more interested in USB 2 support these days. I know it requires an extension pack to be downloaded, since I recently installed it and have just been accessing USB from a guest VM this afternoon. There was no need for me to supply all the details since I chose to encourage the OP to go to the Virtualbox website, where everything can be obtained in one visit.

Thanks Wolfi, that got it.

Ok, maybe you’re right, sorry.
I’m not a lawyer and english is not my native language either.

I meant that your statement was wrong/incorrect.

I did not want to accuse you of a crime.

I would have thought that most users (not all) would be more interested in USB 2 support these days.

This of course depends on what you use VB for in the first place.
I have no idea about that “most users” part.
Personally I usually don’t use the USB support anyway, and never had any reason to download the extension pack yet. But that’s just me.

But most USB2 devices should be accessible via USB1.1 as well, I’d think (much slower of course).
Regarding this discussion that doesn’t matter anyway though, as both versions have exactly the same support in the base package(s) and both can be extended via the same extension pack.

I know it requires an extension pack to be downloaded, since I recently installed it and have just been accessing USB from a guest VM this afternoon.

Yes, but the point is that there is no difference regarding this between openSUSE’s and Oracle’s version.

Your statement would suggest that openSUSE’s version does not support USB at all, and cannot be extended either.
And that’s absolutely wrong.

There was no need for me to supply all the details since I chose to encourage the OP to go to the Virtualbox website, where everything can be obtained in one visit.

Well, but if you want to add/install from Oracle’s repo as you suggested, that (“where everything can be obtained in one visit”) is not completely true either… :wink:

If you meant that all the details that you omitted are available there, that’s true of course.
But I’d still see the need to clarify that there’s no real difference between openSUSE’s and Oracle’s packages in that case. This is of course not mentioned on Oracle’s website, they don’t even mention that packages might be included in the distribution.

OpenSUSE’s packages have of course one advantage: you don’t have to compile the kernel module yourself, especially not after a kernel update.
The main disadvantage is that you first have to change the shipped udev rules file to enable USB support. This can be seen as advantage as well, as this is considered a security risk (at least by openSUSE’s security team). See Access Denied for a discussion if you’re interested.

And last but not least, the packages included in 13.1 are not the latest version and won’t get upgraded to newer versions. 13.1 ships with VB 4.2.18 and will only provide bugfix updates if necessary. There is a repo with the latest version as well though, you can enable it in YaST->Software Repositories->Add->Community Repositories (it’s called “Virtualization”).
Although you might not need a newer version than 4.2.18 anyway, depending on your use-case. One particular bug that broke shared folders in 4.2.18 is fixed in openSUSE’s 4.2.18 version (I pushed the update… :wink: ).

Accepted, and the tone of my response took into account the possibility of linguistic nuances. Trust me on that, my response would have been very different to an accusation of deliberate deception or lying. :wink:

Right, we are not lawyers, and this is not a court where every doubtful point must be corrected. Just before submitting my post I thought to insert “2” after “USB”, but arguably made a careless decision, “mea culpa”.

I have no idea about that “most users” part.

Just my point of view or judgement about general usage today wrt to user awareness and availability of USB2, even though this

But most USB2 devices should be accessible via USB1.1 as well, I’d think (much slower of course).

is mostly the case. I’m beginning to feel “well out of date” without a USB3-enabled controller on my system.

If you meant that all the details that you omitted are available there, that’s true of course.

That was exactly my point, and it’s meaning as a one-stop shop for a distro-specific base package (latest and earlier), the extension (PUEL), documentation, etc. :slight_smile:

This is of course not mentioned on Oracle’s website, they don’t even mention that packages might be included in the distribution.

I tend to notice providers more where they don’t offer a linux distro-specific package, and where it’s in their interests to reference the distribution’s version. Product managers, IME, tend to fill gaps in there own wares where necessary, and do not spend time/money on publicising similar offerings from other organizations.

OpenSUSE’s packages have of course one advantage: you don’t have to compile the kernel module yourself, especially not after a kernel update.
The main disadvantage is that you first have to change the shipped udev rules file to enable USB support. This can be seen as advantage as well, as this is considered a security risk (at least by openSUSE’s security team). See Access Denied for a discussion if you’re interested.

Interesting, I wasn’t aware of the main disadvantage, not having used the openSUSE package for several years.

Well, at least the documentation as pdf file is actually part of the base package (both versions) as well.
It’s installed to /usr/share/doc/packages/virtualbox/UserManual.pdf or /usr/share/doc/packages/VirtualBox-4.3/UserManual.pdf for the Oracle version respectively, and can also be reached in the GUI’s menu (Help->Contents…).

I tend to notice providers more where they don’t offer a linux distro-specific package, and where it’s in their interests to reference the distribution’s version. Product managers, IME, tend to fill gaps in there own wares where necessary, and do not spend time/money on publicising similar offerings from other organizations.

Right.
I didn’t mean that as criticism.
It’s of course perfectly reasonable (and understandable) that they don’t point to every distribution’s packages and possible differences, as they provide their own packages anyway.
But exactly that’s the main reason why I mentioned all that, as you won’t find that information on virtualbox.org.

Interesting, I wasn’t aware of the main disadvantage, not having used the openSUSE package for several years.

It’s not a big issue though, and only has to be done once of course.
Copy the file /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-vboxdrv.rules to /etc/udev/rules.d/ (so it doesn’t get overwritten by updates) and uncomment the (four) rules that are already there, i.e. remove the ‘#’ character at the beginning of the lines.
Then it should behave exactly like Oracle’s version regarding USB. (the rules themselves are exactly the same, only they are commented out in openSUSE’s package)

One important point I forgot to mention: because openSUSE’s packages contain a pre-compiled kernel module, you can only use them with the kernel included in the corresponding openSUSE version. If you want to install a custom kernel, those packages are not an option (the “Virtualization” repo is actually built against Kernel:Stable and Kernel:HEAD but those builds fail for some time already). The latest version is available for Factory (of course, since “Virtualization” is the devel project for Factory) and Tumbleweed (in the subproject Virtualization:VirtualBox_Tumbleweed) though.

Yes, having it accessible from the GUI’s Help menu is a definite advantage as I found out recently, having forgotten how to install VB’s latest Guest Additions into a VM already configured and running the guest. I’ve always highly regarded their documentation.

I’m looking into getting guest additions working as I need a shared folder.

I have these installed by default:
virtualbox-guest-kmp-default
virtualbox-guest-kmp-default
virtualbox-guest-tools
virtualbox-guest-x11

I remember you saying these were not used on a hardware install. Do I need additional packages?

Thanks

Please tell on which system you have installed those packages, the guest or the host.
And what OS is your guest, what OS is your host.

You only need those virtualbox-guest-* packages when you run openSUSE as guest inside VirtualBox, as already mentioned.
If you run VirtualBox on openSUSE (as host), you do not need those packages installed in openSUSE.
But you need to install the guest additions in the guest, hence the name.

Your problem is of course completely different to the OP’s question, so I think you should better open a new thread for your problem, i.e. how to get the guest additions/shared folders working, with more details about your setup to start with.
And it would be better suited to the Virtualization subforum as well, I’d say:
http://forums.opensuse.org/forumdisplay.php/934-Virtualization

Emm… @mikea is the OP of this thread, so no need to change forums in that case? :slight_smile:

If it’s better for me to start new thread that’s fine.

OpenSuse 13.1 is host on my desktop. The packages listed are installed on OpenSuse host. Virtualbox version 4.2.18.

WinXP is guest.

Would it be better to start over with most recent version? Sorry to bother.

Thanks

Not really, as it followed on from my mentioning guest additions anyway.

It’s quite important that the guest editions .iso file, which is installed along with VB within the same directory, to be installed into the guest, is at the same version level as your openSUSE host VB. Sometimes a guest operating system can have an earlier/later version pre-installed. The .iso will contain both Linux and Windows (.exe) installers.

You configure the Host CD/DVD drive to attach directly to the .iso file. You will then run the appropriate (in your case .exe) installer contained in the .iso, from within the guest operating system.

I recommend looking at the chapter on Installing Guest Additions in the VB manual (e.g. via the host VBox Help), it is an easy read and will describe the process for a Windows guest in detail.

Yes, it is better. If you post your question to the Virtualization forum (instead of Install/Boot/Login) you might get better answers as well for your virtualization problem.
The OP’s original question here had actually nothing at all to do with VirtualBox or Virtualization, and specifically not with getting shared folders to work.

OpenSuse 13.1 is host on my desktop. The packages listed are installed on OpenSuse host. Virtualbox version 4.2.18.

WinXP is guest.

As I said, in this case you don’t need any virtualbox-guest packages on your openSUSE system.

But you have to install the Guest Additions in your Windows XP.

See also the documentation, “Help”->“Contents” in VirtualBox’s menu as already mentioned in this thread. (especially chapter 4.2.1 and 4.3)

In the “Devices” menu in the virtual machine’s menu bar, VirtualBox has a handy menu itemnamed “Install guest additions”, which mounts the Guest Additions ISO file inside your virtual

machine. A Windows guest should then automatically start the Guest Additions installer, which

installs the Guest Additions into your Windows guest. Other guest operating systems (or if

automatic start of software on CD is disabled) need manual start of the installer.

Would it be better to start over with most recent version? Sorry to bother.

It should work as well with 4.2.18.