New OpenSuse User

Just wanted to do a quick post and say hello to the forum - I have been a Linux user for nearly 20 years so not new to the platform. Linux has been my sole desktop for nearly that entire time. I had a brief Mac hiatus but came to my senses and went back to Linux. I have used literally dozens of different distributions so not going to list them all. My favorites have been Gentoo and Arch for their minimalistic approach. I realize OpenSuse is anything but minimalistic but the more I use it the more I like it. I have grown tired of spending hours or days to get a functional system. What I look for in a distribution is completeness. Some are not well put together and the admin tools or package management are difficult to use or don’t work as well as others. I am not a command line guru but prefer the CLI over a GUI tool, however the tools available in OpenSuse are very well done so I am finding myself using them more and more.

I first used Suse before it branched into “Suse” and “OpenSuse”. I purchased it somewhere, can’t remember where, was probably mid 90’s. So far I like the distro: all of my hardware works and Yast is about as comprehensive as can be. Software management seems to work well - I just need to get familiar with it. At the same time as my switch to OpenSuse, I have also become a KDE convert. I have used Gnome since version 1 but decided to give KDE a fair shake. Enough said on that - don’t want to start a DE flame war.

I hope to both learn and answer questions here - always something to learn and you can certainly teach an old dog new tricks, as they say.

Welcome to the forums, and to opensuse.

I’m using opensuse for much the same reason. I can install it and use it, without having to worry about putting all of the parts together. Gentoo and Arch are great, but they require more work to have a nicely functioning system. That extra work is good for learning. But as we become tired of it, something like opensuse really fills the bill.

I’m also an old time CLI user. So I am often opening a terminal session. If you are using KDE, then try installing “yakuake”. That’s a nice “drop down” terminal. Most of the time it is out of the way. When I need a command line, I click the key sequence (I’m using CTRL-TAB) and the terminal shows up.

I am using openSUSE leap with KDE plasma for 15 days. This is my first openSUSE experience. I have been a big fan of Mac since i have thinkpad i thought i could use some linux here. Everything i love about openSUSE but i found KDE is not stable. I have to reset my panel to top each time i login.

Welcome to openSUSE. I’ve been happily using the distro since ~year 2001 or so (I was a happy Red Hat user prior to that) and I’ve been happy with the various permutations of SuSE-Pro and then openSUSE … and stuck with openSUSE through all its ups and downs.

There is some good documentation on openSUSE, and if you have not yet discovered, often when looking for information on a topic on openSUSE, one can type ‘wiki openSUSE subject’ in google and get good hits. For example on how to install Skype on openSUSE, replace ‘subject’ with Skype (ie “wiki openSUSE skype” ) and one obtains loads of information from Google.

In addition to these volunteer forums, there is also the mailing lists (where more of the developers and packagers hang out), and also the IRC chat area for quick support … A list of the various communication channels here: https://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Communication_channels

The last few years have seen another major change (and I also think improvement) in openSUSE, with the introduction and increasingly stable implementation of Tumbleweed (the openSUSE rolling release), and even more recent the current openSUSE-Leap, which mostly has a SuSE-Linux-Enterprise (SLE) core and openSUSE packaged applications. Thanks to the mostly SLE core, support for LEAP is intended to be much longer than the 18-months in the older openSUSE.

IMHO we are lucky to have a good group on our forum, and having such great people here is one of the reasons I’ve stuck around with this distribution for over a decade.

Best wishes!

Thanks for the replies all, appreciate it. My main problem is that for some crazy reason I LIKE installing and tweaking operating systems. I don’t do it for a living but I have always liked it. I typically get bored with a distro and switch but I am trying to break myself of that habit because I usually do it on my “production” machine and that never ends well…I should do it in a VM but installing on bare metal is so much more exciting :stuck_out_tongue:

So far I really like the tools available in KDE: digikam, k3b, dolphin. They are doing what I need them to do and there are so many configuration options that if I don’t like something, I can change it. Happy to be here so far!

sminrana - I found KDE to be a little unstable with all of the eye-candy effects turned on so I turned all of the effects off. Just my experience, might not have anything to do with your issue.

oldcpu - I am finding OpenSuse to be a very solid distro so far and the documentation is good. I have found everything I needed so far by searching.

Then just do it.

Last month, I installed Tumbleweed (I do a monthly test install). I also installed solus 1.1. And I installed the “krypton” variant of Tumbleweed (using unstable development repos). I’m waiting for slackware 14.2 to be released, and I’ll probably try installing that. I blog about some of the install, but not all of them (I didn’t blog about the solus 1.1 install, because it wasn’t sufficiently different from solus 1.0).

I keep a spare partition available for experimental installs.

I actually really liked Slackware, but software availability in the repos was pretty slim. I know they have a site dedicated to software package builds but I never stayed with the distro long enough to really experiment with it. The only other negative thing for me was getting my printer and scanner to work - was going to take more effort than I wanted to put in.

My only other consideration was dropping Linux entirely and moving to BSD. Fantastic OS but hardware support is not there - my printer and scanner are both paperweights under BSD, or required more effort than I cared to put in.

I have multiple SSDs I can play with but after 2 months of distro hopping, I am tired right now and just want something to work. After a few months I may get bored and do it all over again :stuck_out_tongue:

On 2016-04-16, sevendogs <sevendogs@no-mx.forums.microfocus.com> wrote:
> Just wanted to do a quick post and say hello to the forum - I have been
> a Linux user for nearly 20 years so not new to the platform.

Welcome!

> Linux has
> been my sole desktop for nearly that entire time. I had a brief Mac
> hiatus but came to my senses and went back to Linux.

I believe Linux Torvalds has a Mac but with GNU/Linux installed.

> My favorites have been Gentoo and Arch for their minimalistic
> approach. <SNIP> I have grown tired of spending hours or days
> to get a functional system.

I haven’t used Arch but I regularly use Gentoo. Gentoo has rolling release compile-as-you-go philosophy. In many ways
that makes it easier because you can always compile your way out of trouble. However I concede it takes about 3 hours
for a full install (depending on your `destination’) and Portage can be stickler for details when it comes to updating
(especially kernels).

But every GNU/Linux distribution has advantages and disadvantages, and there’s no reason why you can’t benefit from the
advantages of both. Every machine I own has at least one up-to-date version of openSUSE on it and some other OS. The big
advantage of openSUSE (with for me the only exception of openSUSE Leap 42.1) is that it `just works out of the box’,
with YaST setting the gold standard benchmark for best practices, and the install a reliable standby. People claim the
same for Ubuntu/Mint but just watch those GNU/Linux distributions try to recommend a sensible partition arrangement for
a RAID array with UEFI Secure Boot and 3 other operating systems.

> At the same time as my switch to OpenSuse,
> I have also become a KDE convert. I have used Gnome since version 1 but
> decided to give KDE a fair shake. Enough said on that - don’t want to
> start a DE flame war.

Well it’s a storm in a teacup since both offer a mouse-driven interface with clickable icons, windows, and eye candy. I
believe it’s just a matter of taste. From a programming perspective, I personally loathe the variety of desktops out
there since all my Qt-based GUIs can easily go wrong in GNOME/XFCE and therefore I have to waste time testing everything
in GTK-based as well Qt-based DEs. And the DE split originates not because of some benevolence from DE developers to
offer choice but because of religious reasons pertaining to licensing issues and C vs C++ snobbery. But from the
end-user’s point of view, it’s still just a storm in a teacup… both KDE and GNOME are good.