New Net installation on laptop

I am re-purposing a family T530 laptop and trying to do things correctly. Two issues:-

I have downloaded the Tumbleweed iso file openSUSE-Tumbleweed-NET-x86_64-Snapshot20200416-Media.iso and following the instructions ran a gpg verification check.
I was surprised to receive the following message;-

sudo gpg --verify openSUSE-Tumbleweed-NET-x86_64-Snapshot20200416-Media.iso
[sudo] password for root: 
gpg: verify signatures failed: Unexpected error

I shall ignore this for now and check the sha256 checksum but thought I would start a thread just in case!

My second question concerns the existing windoze system. I have cloned my hard drive to SSD which is much bigger than my hard drive (sign of progress!) but even so and having ensured all is well thought I would shrink the partition to make more of the new drive available for Linux. Silly me I used the windoze tool and bumped against the unmoveable files so I now have a gap in my partition layout. If I use the Tumbleweed installation iso will it run gparted as usual and sort ot my partitions as needed?

Regards,
Budge

Which instructions?

Won’t do things auto-magically you may be able to sort things out but really depends on details

I have it now. I was following the Checksums link on the openSUSE download page. The instructions were more clever then me but all is well now I have the signing key.
Many thanks.

Which instructions were those that you followed?

I really would not have expected that to work.

Also, you do not need “sudo” for verification, unless you have put the opensuse signing key into a root gpg keyring. I just check as myself.

Here’s what I just did:

I downloaded 3 files:


openSUSE-Tumbleweed-NET-x86_64-Snapshot20200416-Media.iso
openSUSE-Tumbleweed-NET-x86_64-Snapshot20200416-Media.iso.sha256
openSUSE-Tumbleweed-NET-x86_64-Snapshot20200416-Media.iso.sha256.asc

I then checked the gpg signature:


gpg --verify openSUSE-Tumbleweed-NET-x86_64-Snapshot20200416-Media.iso.sha256{.asc,}

Notice that I did that as myself. I did not use “sudo”. And that checked the signature for the “.sha256” file.

And, finally, I checked the downloaded iso itself:


sha256sum -c openSUSE-Tumbleweed-NET-x86_64-Snapshot20200416-Media.iso.sha256

which reported that the downloaded “.iso” file was okay.

This is relatively recent change. In the past sha256 file was clearsigned (with embedded ASCII armored signature) which was common source of confusion when using it to verify checksum. No separate detached signature was provided. Wiki article describes exactly this old method. May be someone needs to update it to reflect current situation.

I am unsure. That one?

https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Download_help#Example:_Verify_Tumbleweed_Netinstall

About what?

That one?

If the question is abut wiki article that explains how to check hashsums - yes.

Although I haven’t checked,
I have no reason to assume that anything has changed,
The openSUSE install will look for contiguous free, unpartitioned space and propose installing in it.
Without knowing the details, I don’t know exactly what your problem might be using the “Windows tool” which I assume is the command line “parted” Although people have written about shortcomings over the years, I’ve never run into it preventing me from doing what I wanted.
If you’re still storing boot information in the MBR and your BIOS is subject to the INTBios13 restrictions, then your boot files have to be towards the beginning of your disk. If you think that what you’re trying to do should work regardless of any restrictions, you can download and run Gparted Live to execute the changes you want to make.

TSU

Many thanks for all the help and advice. It is true that the wiki I read did not mention the signature issue but now sorted and I have now gone on to install Tumbleweed in the empty space on my new SSD (what a difference!!!) hard drive.

All is working but there are a couple of things on which I need further advice.

I used to install my new system grub in the root directory but it has been a long time and forget the detail so taking the line of least resistance from the easy installation option accepted the default MBR.
No problem because grub picked up the windoze partition and I can now dual boot as intended but was that the right decision.

In the grub menu I am offered both Window 10 and Windows 7. Windows 10 needed to do some cleaning up but then ran as expected. Windows 7 menu brings up an error screen and lack of signature. The background is that the windows 7 system was upgraded to windows 10. Can I ignore the windows7 menu item? Why is it there and is there anything I should correct or should I delete it from the grub menu?

Also in my enthusiasm I used Btfs file system for my /home directory only remembering afterwards that I needed ext4 for some reason connected with some non linux software. Plenty or room on drive at present so should I just make space, create a new directory, rename and move etc or should I boot a live distro and change the file system using a suitable tool?

Love the SSD

Thanks again for the help.

At least that works. If you wanted the root directory, there’s a choice for that. But the choice is just “Boot from a partition” (or something like that). It uses the partition containing “/boot” which is normally the root partition.

I suggest you just leave it as it is for now, since that is working well.

In the grub menu I am offered both Window 10 and Windows 7. Windows 10 needed to do some cleaning up but then ran as expected. Windows 7 menu brings up an error screen and lack of signature. The background is that the windows 7 system was upgraded to windows 10. Can I ignore the windows7 menu item? Why is it there and is there anything I should correct or should I delete it from the grub menu?

Just ignore the Windows 7 entry. The “os-prober” found the Windows 7 loader, but apparently it could not tell that it had been superseded by Windows 10.

I can’t advise you on the “/home” issue. You will have to decide that. I don’t know enough about your requirements to make a useful suggestion.

Basic advice for new installs:

  • Use UEFI when available. Different systems are truly independent.
  • Turn off CSM unless you really need it
  • Disable secure boot
  • Use ext4 unless you are sure you actually need a different file system
  • Provide separate system and /home partitions
  • Provide unused space for testing new systems or backup system

Following what I thought was a reasonably successful installation on my new SSD and then building up my Desktop I found I was getting warning messages about running out of memory etc. and after a brief examination of the system have found that the new installation of Tumbleweed had been squashed into the original disk space so is now shared with windoze 10. Meanwhile all the additional disk space in the SSD remains unused.

So rather than waste time I just started over by cloning the original 500GB drive onto the 1000GB SSD, thus (I hope) erasing anything from my first install of Tumbleweed.

A check reboot proved that the Windoze 10 was working fine so I then started a network installation of Tumbleweed and when I reached the partitioning section, selected the expert mode starting with the existing layout, which is what I have always done in the past.

Now I can see all the unformatted space (about 480GB) on which I intended to add three partitions using Btrfs for / and ext4 for /home and the swap but for reasons which I do not understand I am not able to add partitions to the unallocated space. This is very new to me so what must I do to bring this space into use so I can create the new partitions please?

  •  		 			:shame:  I am embarrased to have forgotten that Windoze normally uses only primary partitions and together with Lenovo they have used all four primaries.  So used to working only with my own machines.
    

Next question, what to do and which partition should I change with least risk of breaking the windoze parts. I am reluctant to delete the Lenovo stuff as it came with the machine from new and the owner doesn’t want it changed! Any thoughts? Meanwhile I do not think the Tumbleweed installer can manipulate the partitions from within the installation unless I delete one. Is this correct?
Grateful for advice please.

I normally use the expert partitioner. But I’ll agree that it is somewhat confusing.

I have to click on the device itself (“/dev/sda” and not “/dev/sda3” or similar). If you have an NVME device, the name will be different. But click on the device, rather than a partition.

Then, toward the lower left of the screen there should be a choice for partitioning or a choice for modify. And clicking on that allows you to add a partition.

Hi and thanks but I think I am stuffed by the existing four primary partitions.

Clearly there is a choice now of changing from MBR to GPT and since the original widoze was windoze 7 and has been upgraded by windozs 10 it should all work with GPT. If I stay with MBR then I have to convert a Primary to Logical. My only concern is the probability that there is windoze system stuff likely to get mangled. Will read a bit more before I decide.

Many thanks for the help.
Regards
Budgie2

Yes, that can be an issue.

[/QUOTE]Clearly there is a choice now of changing from MBR to GPT and since the original widoze was windoze 7 and has been upgraded by windozs 10 it should all work with GPT.[/QUOTE]
Be careful there.

Windows 7 can actually work with GPT, provided that it is installed that way (and uses UEFI booting). But that might also be an issue with Windows 10. If installed with DOS/MBR partitioning, it might not work with GPT unless you reinstall. However, I’m not a Windows person, so I could be mistaken on that.

Clearly there is a choice now of changing from MBR to GPT and since the original widoze was windoze 7 and has been upgraded by windozs 10 it should all work with GPT.[/QUOTE]
Be careful there.

Windows 7 can actually work with GPT, provided that it is installed that way (and uses UEFI booting). But that might also be an issue with Windows 10. If installed with DOS/MBR partitioning, it might not work with GPT unless you reinstall. However, I’m not a Windows person, so I could be mistaken on that.[/QUOTE]

Hi nrickert et al.
I have been reading a bit more as there are several threads about dual boot which are relevant. Taking a step back from my details there are fundamental questions arising from dual boot installation when the original OS is Windoze 7 or upgraded to W10 and when the original partition has been an MBR installation and includes an OEM recovery primary partition such as Lenovo leaving the disk with four primary partitions.

Two questions arise when adding partitions for the installation of Linux one retaining the MBR structure and one changing the structure to UEFI booting (GPT?)

The problem I have found with manipulating MBR partition structure is cause by difficult to move System files which resist copying when using Windoze tools. I can work around this but I am not sure I want to continue to build on the older system.

The problem I face is how can I change to UEFI booting and have the Windoze system still work OK.

Given that this is a repurposed computer with a new SSD I am inclined to move with the times and have the whole setup using UEFI so is there a thread or wiki/howto fore achieving what I seek?

A fresh install is recommended for Windows 10 anyway: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-MBzpxDcKQ

See also: Beginners Guide to Install Windows With Ubuntu in Dual Boot