New install won't boot

The jumper on the PATA Drive is set for a 40 pin connector.
With it disconnected I was able to boot the Leap on the windows drive(i had to go do the ‘grub2-mkconfig’) to reset what was left,
I also had to set the grub edit for that that install to add ‘nomodeset’ before it would boot.
SO, if it starts with the PATA out it SHOULD, IMO, boot with the PATA drive in. Just saying…

Gonna put it back in, see what happens after resetting Grub2 menu.

What a pile of fuss! Switching to gpt and EFI helps resolve all issues. Did that some years ago: https://karlmistelberger.wordpress.com/2018/05/15/fruehjahsputz/

Triple boot Windows, Leap, Tumbleweed:

**i3-4130:~ #** fdisk -l /dev/sda 
**Disk /dev/sda: 232.89 GiB, 250059350016 bytes, 488397168 sectors**
Disk model: CT250MX500SSD1   
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes 
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes 
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes 
Disklabel type: gpt 
Disk identifier: 3B04C452-DAD9-45C6-9BD3-AE398288F628 

**Device    ****    Start****      End****  Sectors****  Size****Type**
/dev/sda1       2048   1026047   1024000   500M EFI System 
/dev/sda2    1026048 283596799 282570752 134.7G Linux filesystem 
/dev/sda3  283596800 385996799 102400000  48.8G Linux filesystem 
/dev/sda4  385996800 386029567     32768    16M Microsoft reserved 
/dev/sda5  386029568 488396799 102367232  48.8G Microsoft basic data 
**i3-4130:~ #** lsblk -f /dev/sda 
NAME   FSTYPE FSVER LABEL      UUID                                 FSAVAIL FSUSE% MOUNTPOINTS 
sda                                                                                 
├─sda1 vfat   FAT16            6B6D-1CDE                             472.8M     5% /boot/efi 
├─sda2 btrfs        tumbleweed 227128c2-8703-4859-a006-30dccf5b299c  114.2G    14% /var 
│                                                                                  /usr/local 
│                                                                                  /srv 
│                                                                                  /root 
│                                                                                  /opt 
│                                                                                  /home 
│                                                                                  /boot/grub2/x86_64-efi 
│                                                                                  /boot/grub2/i386-pc 
│                                                                                  /.snapshots 
│                                                                                  / 
├─sda3 btrfs        leap       85d405ec-d559-49a1-b59c-5c5c9f176724                 
├─sda4                                                                              
└─sda5 ntfs                    FE06394606390167                                     
**i3-4130:~ #**

Heavy upgrading and many new installs, but no more failed boots:

**i3-4130:~ #** efibootmgr 
BootCurrent: 0002 
Timeout: 1 seconds 
BootOrder: 0002,0001,0003,0004,0005,0007,0008,0000 
Boot0000* opensuse 
Boot0001* leap 
Boot0002* tumbleweed 
Boot0003* Windows Boot Manager 
Boot0004* Windows Boot Manager 
Boot0005* ubuntu 
Boot0007* arch 
Boot0008* manjaro 
**i3-4130:~ #** 

1- Yes, but only in ‘nomodeset’ mode(the graphics are oval, and the screen is terrible to look at.
I considered taking it out, putting 15.2 on it, the upgrade to 15.3.1. I know not a good idea.

2-Also it is VERY SLOW & UNRESPONSIVE to do anything on it,
especially with zipper or YaST.(because of ‘nomodeset’???)

3- I put the PATA drive cable and power back in and now the system doesn’t recognize it(I haven’t check to see if Windows finds it).
That was my only decent working version. What a loss!

4- So until the ‘fix’ noted in another thread is out, I am stuck with the slow ugly 15.3 latest kernel on the Windows HDD, or boot the internal SATA version(which could also use that ‘fix’!

5- the jumper on the PATA drive is set for a 40 ribbon cable(cable select?), not master or slave.

6- I guess I’ll just have to live with it, since I can’t afford new equipment.

@karlmistelberger, all good thoughts BUT I am a casual user, on a limited budget, and trying to update/upgrade/ an older legacy machine is not on my bucket list, at least for now! Thanks for your input!

Nomodeset is not intended for anything but enabling fixing broken stuff, working around problems. Ovals are because modes supported without KMS are mostly 4:3 modes, which on 16:9 screens makes everything fat.

2-Also it is VERY SLOW & UNRESPONSIVE to do anything on it,
especially with zipper or YaST.(because of ‘nomodeset’???)
Yes, because of nomodeset!

3- I put the PATA drive cable and power back in and now the system doesn’t recognize it(I haven’t check to see if Windows finds it).
What’s your hurry to respond here without trying everything in the list first? What exactly does “system doesn’t recognize” mean? A BIOS doesn’t ordinarily see drives connected to add-on controllers. It’s up to the BIOS on the controller to handle drives connected to it.

4- So until the ‘fix’ noted in another thread is out, I am stuck with the slow ugly 15.3 latest kernel on the Windows HDD, or boot the internal SATA version(which could also use that ‘fix’!
The fixed kernel is out in kernel-default-5.3.18-150300.59.46.1.x86_64.rpm on the mirrors now.

5- the jumper on the PATA drive is set for a 40 ribbon cable(cable select?), not master or slave.
When the jumper is on CS, some drives don’t respond correctly without a CS cable. A CS cable has a visible hole in it somewhere near one connector. Without a CS cable, the jumper should be set to primary or master or only, depending on the labeling and whether there is another PATA drive on the cable.

I would like to know the relationship between how Leap 15.3.1 starts from the grub menu WITH the PATA, and WITHOUT the PATA connected.(see below)
In my feeble mind, the PATA connected should still allow everything to work right.

First off I removed the only jumper that was there , but the effect was the same with or without.(see next couple of paragraphs).

If the PATA drive is disconnected, the GRUB2 menu for the WindowsHDD Leap shows it starts with the latest kernel(59.46), and the start up is fast, the operations are fast.

If I reconnect the PATA drive, the GRUB2 menu shows it wants to start with the previous kernel(59.43), AND WILL NOT complete the boot into the GUI.

BTW, the latest kernel update got the graphincs in the screen back to good crips readable, and not ugly like nomodeset did.

This is an image of the jumper settings for various configurations on the Western Digital drive https://susepaste.org/79994933 if I made it a ‘slave’ would it help?? My PATA has the 10 pin jumper.

BTW, I can’t easily get to the back of the machine to remove the card! That is going to have to wait for a day when my health permits, so disconnecting the cables, and reconnecting them are what I can do easily.

Or I can find a good adapter PATA to SATA and be done with it. I have one motherboard port still open, Hopefully it will accept another HDD.

You’re obviously not booting from the same drive when the PATA is connected as you are with it connected. The menus are different, therefore, different menus from different places.

First off I removed the only jumper that was there , but the effect was the same with or without.(see next couple of paragraphs).
Follow the jumper instructions provided for your model HDD. Period. This is how PATA works, or doesn’t.

If the PATA drive is disconnected, the GRUB2 menu for the WindowsHDD Leap shows it starts with the latest kernel(59.46), and the start up is fast, the operations are fast.
Which Leap, on which drive? Do you expect us to remember which filesystem has which openSUSE on it? Don’t be expecting us to have memorized your jungle. Make it clear what you booted, including where it lives. Volume labels would help with that.

If I reconnect the PATA drive, the GRUB2 menu shows it wants to start with the previous kernel(59.43), AND WILL NOT complete the boot into the GUI.
Your job now is to determine where the grub.cfg that produces this result lives, so that it either can be stopped from being used for booting installations on the SATA drives, or made to boot them correctly. The former makes better sense for you IMO, and will require removing Grub from the PATA entirely, wiping the first 440 bytes from the MBR of the PATA actually, ensuring there’s no bootabilty from the PATA, so that the PC BIOS controls booting by loading boot code from one of the SATAs. It’s possible this PATA wiping isn’t actually necessary, if the BIOS has appropriate settings to ensure the SATA disks take boot preference. Older BIOS have settings for this, because it used to be common to use SCSI hosted disks to boot from, which required the SCSI HBA BIOS to take charge, which required the PC BIOS to relinquish control. You seem to have the situation where your PATA controller BIOS is taking charge just like a real SCSI HBA when it has a connected and powered up disk.

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I’ll try to find a fdisk or lsblk output to annotate. Right now the PATA drive is disconnected.

Sorry for some bleary tiredness addling my brain.
If I boot with the PATA disconnected, the Windows version in Grub edit shows the latest kernel(59.46)
IF I reconnect the PATA drive, the Windows version in Grub edit show it want to use the previous kernel(59.43)
The OTHER SATA install boots correctly regardless if PATA is or isn’t connected.

I 'think" I have ran a ‘grub2-mkconfig’ with all three in the system. If I did I ran it from the OTHER Sata HDD that does boot to the latest kernel(59.46) IIRC the output indicated it found all three versions.
I doubt I ran it from the PATA Leap, with the other 2 still in the system.(Another B.F.!)

I’ll look at the link for the jumpers when my mind is back on normal things instead of good/bad news from 4 doctors today!
The BIOS for the machine is very old and very limited to what it can and can’t do. I’ve been in that sucker so much i practically know it without looking.
SO of too slumber away a VERY LONG day!
Thanks for all your efforts to put my engine on the good rails!

Hi
When you add an additional drive, you need to go into the BIOS and check the order of the disks and if efi the order of boot as well… I suspect this is your issue, once get that sorted stick to one grub to boot and ensure any other linux installs DONOT run os-prober. Change your boot grub theme to something that distinguishes it from the default install so you know you are always running the correct one.

As stated above in another post the BIOS is VERY OLD, and very limited in scope. But I will give it another try.! THANKS!

SO I didn’t go to bed! I can’t sleep if something is nagging my brain.
SO>> I put the PATA drive back in the chain, booted from it, ran the ‘grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg’
I shut down and rebooted and checked the kernel lines for all of the Leap installs on this machine.
They all were latest kernel {95.46}**(FINALLY)! ** I booted up each of the three and Win 7 and that all boot as they should(won’t do the Win10 thing! IT would take tonight and tomorrow to ‘update’ 3 or 4 things)

So, now I decide which ones I may keep and which to turn into data storage or backup (although my back up is external and large usb sticks).

Close this thread and if I need more help with it I will breath life back into it or make a new post.

THANKS TO EVERYONE that had input but mrmazda in particular!

Use your brain. Unplug the network cable, then boot it. :slight_smile:

I was skimming around in this thread wondering if it might be related to this one detailing the problem w/ the Radeon kernel module, I believe. I noticed stuff here about blank screen upon booting.
https://forums.opensuse.org/showthread.php/565718-Repair-after-faulty-kernel-update

Point: Part of the problem with mixed SATA and PATA is that the BIOS may randomly chose which drive to boot from based on when the drive becomes available and BIOS settings may not help.

Hi
Yes, very true, especially if it’s an old machine…

Ha! I never thought of that, but I did take the time to add keys to the registry to turn off ‘auto updates’.
But as I have stated before, I rarely use Win10. It is just a big block of garbage taking up space.
I do use Win7 for iPod things, and don’t care about its E.O.L., or Win10 being at its limit on this machine!

Things are working with or without the PATA drive hooked up.