Networking Utilities

Hello,

I’m an IT administrator for a Windows network but I like checking up on things like DHCP, DNS, etc. I use Windows Vista Business on my laptop currently but am considering using a dual-boot of openSUSE for testing things on my network.

I know that Windows XP is nice to do this but I like Vista for some other things.

Having said that, Vista says “Identifying…” where XP usually says the more intuitive, “Acquiring IP address”, not to mention I believe DHCP discovery is faster on Windows XP.

How is it on openSUSE? Does the terminal in openSUSE have any noteworthy networking tools?

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First, welcome to the forum. Second, does opensuse have any noteworthy
networking tools… oh my goodness yes. Typically the command line in
*nix is MUCH more powerful than DOS (I haven’t seen an exception yet). If
there are specific cases then feel free to add them but Network Manager
(little icon on the desktop) tells me when I’m connecting to a network
though it’s not really for troubleshooting. With that said log files are
easy to read (/var/log/messages, /var/log/NetworkManager) and can be very
verbose so that’s helpful. On the troubleshooting side you can watch (for
example) your wireless network card as it is connecting to the wireless
network (even before DHCP does its thing) using something like the
‘iwevent’ command.

Other tools that I use all the time include netstat (shows
connections/sockets/etc. like on any platform), netcat (network tester…
great for testing open ports… much better than the often-used telnet
tool), nmap (port scanner, host identifier), tcpdump (LAN tracer), etc.
I’m sure there are more but it’s easiest to show you great examples if I
have a use case. For example… “Help the internet is down and I can’t
get to Google”. While this example is stupid (the Internet is never
down…) there are several ways to test this. First, ping. If it doesn’t
work you can check your network configuration with three quick commands
(ip addr show, ip route show, cat /etc/resolv.conf). If pinging
does work (by DNS name) then you can test the port with netcat with one
quick command and easy-to-understand output (netcat -zv www.google.com 80). If that works then something is wrong with your browser. Test with
another browser using ‘curl’ or ‘wget’ (curl http://www.google.com and
see output of HTML directly on your screen).

Anyway, the command line in Linux is awesome… windows is frustrating
after a while because of all the tools you don’t have.

Good luck.

mikael21 wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I’m an IT administrator for a Windows network but I like checking up on
> things like DHCP, DNS, etc. I use Windows Vista Business on my laptop
> currently but am considering using a dual-boot of openSUSE for testing
> things on my network.
>
> I know that Windows XP is nice to do this but I like Vista for some
> other things.
>
> Having said that, Vista says “Identifying…” where XP usually says the
> more intuitive, “Acquiring IP address”, not to mention I believe DHCP
> discovery is faster on Windows XP.
>
> How is it on openSUSE? Does the terminal in openSUSE have any
> noteworthy networking tools?
>
>
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Hmm thats interesting. That’s why I like Linux so much is that its so power user friendly.

I just need to find time to install then I will actually give those a try sometime :slight_smile:

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All of those I mentioned (except possibly nmap) should usually be
installed by default. NMAP is probably in the repository by default as well.

Good luck.

mikael21 wrote:
> Hmm thats interesting. That’s why I like Linux so much is that its so
> power user friendly.
>
> I just need to find time to install then I will actually give those a
> try sometime :slight_smile:
>
>
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On Wed April 8 2009 02:05 pm, ab@novell.com wrote:

> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> First, welcome to the forum. Second, does opensuse have any noteworthy
> networking tools… oh my goodness yes. Typically the command line in
> *nix is MUCH more powerful than DOS (I haven’t seen an exception yet). If
> there are specific cases then feel free to add them but Network Manager
> (little icon on the desktop) tells me when I’m connecting to a network
> though it’s not really for troubleshooting. With that said log files are
> easy to read (/var/log/messages, /var/log/NetworkManager) and can be very
> verbose so that’s helpful. On the troubleshooting side you can watch (for
> example) your wireless network card as it is connecting to the wireless
> network (even before DHCP does its thing) using something like the
> ‘iwevent’ command.
>
> Other tools that I use all the time include netstat (shows
> connections/sockets/etc. like on any platform), netcat (network tester…
> great for testing open ports… much better than the often-used telnet
> tool), nmap (port scanner, host identifier), tcpdump (LAN tracer), etc.
> I’m sure there are more but it’s easiest to show you great examples if I
> have a use case. For example… “Help the internet is down and I can’t
> get to Google”. While this example is stupid (the Internet is never
> down…) there are several ways to test this. First, ping. If it doesn’t
> work you can check your network configuration with three quick commands
> (ip addr show, ip route show, cat /etc/resolv.conf). If pinging
> does work (by DNS name) then you can test the port with netcat with one
> quick command and easy-to-understand output (`netcat -zv www.google.com

80). If that works then something is wrong with your browser. Test with > another browser using 'curl' or 'wget' (curl http://www.google.com` and
> see output of HTML directly on your screen).
>
> Anyway, the command line in Linux is awesome… windows is frustrating
> after a while because of all the tools you don’t have.
>
> Good luck.
>
>
>
>
>
> mikael21 wrote:
>> Hello,
>>
>> I’m an IT administrator for a Windows network but I like checking up on
>> things like DHCP, DNS, etc. I use Windows Vista Business on my laptop
>> currently but am considering using a dual-boot of openSUSE for testing
>> things on my network.
<snip>
mikael21;
One additional utility is “wireshark” which captures network activity.

P. V.
“We’re all in this together, I’m pulling for you.” Red Green