Network Manager

It took awhile, and now the wireless on my laptop is working fine. The next step is to make the laptop useful on the road.
Reading thru the forum I am not sure I should even try Knetworkmanager. I know that when I go into Yast and make it
the controlling entity the wireless is gone. Are there better managers available? Also, what are net wallet and net folder used for?

What information if any, from Yast is used by KnetworkManager?

Carl

So you are saying: That if you use Network Manager Control, wireless does not work. Which must mean you setup up wireless in ifup.?

There is an alternative to knetworkmanager in the plasmoid-networkmanager. If you select to install the plasmoid, it should remove knetworkmanager.
But you have to set the network to be managed by network manager.
kwallet manages the passphrase for the network and you must choose to use it

Only the checkbox that switches the control from NetworkManger to ifup. All knetworkmanager related files are stored in your home directory. Don’t be afraid of trying out knetworkmanager :slight_smile: It was actually working well for me before I switched to the plasmoid.

YaST switches the control to NetworkManager and not knetworkmanager. Knetworkmanager is just a front end for controlling NetworkManager. If You want You can control it using cli NetworkManager applet or the Gnome nm-aplet. You can find information on how to use nm-aplet under KDE this here :
Gave up Knetworkmanager. Made Networkmanager-GNOME work on KDE4!

Anyway if I were in your shoes I would start of with the plasmoid and configure it properly.
Of course You did not tell us which DE are You using so maybe You’re not using KDE at all ? All the other DEs use the Gnome nm-aplet as far as I know by default.
Hope this helps.

Best regards,
Greg

Well, an alternative is wicd; I am not going to say that it is better or worse (works pretty well for me, except in that, on return from hibernation it sometimes lies about whether you are connected, for a while, and takes a few seconds longer than is strictly necessary to establish a connection - but then, networkmanager (plasmoid) worked pretty well for me, until an upgrade borked it, and it was easier to try something else rather than fix it).

Probably the best advice is that quoted earlier; try PlasmoidNM, and if that doesn’t work, ask for advice and if that doesn’t work, try an alternate.

Are you connecting to a network with a hidden SSID?

Using NetworkManager in KDE, the only problem that I have had is with a hidden SSID network.

If that is your problem, then switch to the plasmoid networkmanager applet. You will still have that problem. But then use
iwlist wlan0 scanning essid “ssidname”
(do above as root). You should then be able to connect, and it will connect on future reboots.

The good news for travelling, is that mostly you won’t have to deal with hidden SSIDs.

An alternative solution, which I am using, is:
Install LXDE. Run the gnome nm-applet while in LXDE. Configure your main WiFi in nm-applet, and set that to be available to all users (will require the root password). With that configured, NetworkManager should connect to that network before any login, and the connection will be usable (but not configurable) within KDE.

Sorry folks for the long time lapse. Life got in the way of this project.
I took the simple solution and Configured NetworkManager.

The problem seems to be that the passphase does not satisfy the hand shake. I know
the phase is good because it works in ifpu mode.

I have not tried connecting to a unsecured networked. At this point I am not using KWallet.

I am not user how to trouble shoot this problem.

Carl

I have not tried connecting to a unsecured networked. At this point I am not using KWallet.

IIRC, you need to use kwallet for this to work properly (if using encrypted passwords). Others please clarify or correct me if I’m wrong here.

http://forums.opensuse.org/english/get-technical-help-here/network-internet/464068-how-do-i-stop-kwallet-interfering-network-manager.html#post2374612

Yes this is correct

I have NetworkManager configured to “Do not store (always prompt)”.
What is NetworkManager doing with the passphase I enter. I know it is valid?

Carl

Is it WEP or WPA?

WEP requires the use of the full hex key, not a passphrase

I have tryed both passphase and full hex with the same results.

Carl

I changed my router to unsecured and I connected with out a problem.

Carl

If you use KDE and the network manager you must use the kwallet.

You still didn’t confirm if this is WEP, but I assume it is since you did confirm using a hex key.
So I reiterate : If only WEP is available to you, you must use the Hex Key

If you can switch the access point to WPA that would be better and safer too.
But did I say this: You must use kwallet

If I am understanding this correctly, NetworkManager can only process a key from a encrypted file and not from a prompt?

Carl

If I am understanding this correctly, NetworkManager can only process a key from a encrypted file and not from a prompt?

Carl

No. It can take the key from a prompt and store it in an encrypted file.

Best regards,
Greg

Although <by default> Network Manager requires access to Kwallet, it’s not required. After installation, a Network Manager option is to store the key in a file and not in Kwallet (but unless you have a special reason to do so, that’s pretty dumb).

Earlier, it was suggested that knetworkmanager is only a frontend for network manager, I have found that to be incorrect. Knetworkmanager is a version of the Gnome Network Manager Project custom compiled to operate as part of the KDE desktop (not “just” a frontend to anything). If you install and run any other network manager application, it’s separate code and not knetworkmanager.

I guess the question to the OP should be “Why aren’t you permitting the password to be stored in Kwallet?” I assume you need to store the key somewhere, why not Kwallet?

As for CLI alternatives to Network Manager I recommend only for special circumstances
When connecting using WEP, use iw, which isn’t installed by default.
When connecting using WPA/WPA2, use wpa_supplicant which is always already installed by default, AFAIK all of today’s wireless managers are built on top of wpa_supplicant and you can invoke wpa_supplicant directly if you wish…

IMO and HTH,
Tony

Earlier, it was suggested that knetworkmanager is only a frontend for network manager, I have found that to be incorrect. Knetworkmanager is a version of the Gnome Network Manager Project custom compiled to operate as part of the KDE desktop (not “just” a frontend to anything). If you install and run any other network manager application, it’s separate code and not knetworkmanager.

While there is some truth to that, (because each graphical front-end also has its own subsystem), I think glsitwan’s point was that one could install NetworkManager-gnome if they preferred its features.

YaST switches the control to NetworkManager and not knetworkmanager. Knetworkmanager is just a front end for controlling NetworkManager. If You want You can control it using cli NetworkManager applet or the Gnome nm-aplet. You can find information on how to use nm-aplet under KDE this here :
Gave up Knetworkmanager. Made Networkmanager-GNOME work on KDE4!

In any case, with recent versions of KDE4, Networkmanager-kde4 has undergone changes, and for openSUSE, it has been replaced by the plasmoid-networkmanagement package instead. However, one can still use the former if preferred.