Network adapter and other hardware disappear after parallel installation of 12.2

I’ve installed 12.3 RC1 and am very happy with it, but I wanted to have 12.2 as a stable alternative in a dual-boot configuration. I first installed 12.3, then 12.2 on an LVM partition, keeping the /boot partition I made for 12.3.

Before installing 12.2, 12.3 RC1 was able to access USB sticks and my LAN and WLAN networks without problems. As soon as I installed 12.2, the network was no longer recognized and I couldn’t establish any network connections at all. USB sticks and an external DVD reader were also not recognized, not even by YaST’s partitioner tool.

Updating my 12.3 installation from the DVD got me my hardware back, but trying to boot into 12.2 ended up booting me into 12.3. I’m happier with that though than not having any network at all, so I’ve deleted my 12.2 partition and am running only 12.3 now.

Does anybody know how that could be happening though? Both 12.3 and 12.2 were of course installed on different partitions and I didn’t even set mount points for the different root partitions - I just had them share the same home partition. So they shouldn’t be affecting each others’ hardware recognition, right?

It seems that you think about this construct as something that is happening all of the time and thus understood by many people. But I can assure you that not very many will understand from this vague description how many disks you have, nor how they are partitioned, nor how you use those disk and/or partitions in a LVM configuration. Especialy the “I first installed 12.3, then 12.2 in an (one?) LVM partition (what is that?)” is like a riddle to me.

And when youi try to explain what you have, do not forget to add computer fact to your story telling. Like

fdisk -l

and lvdisplay and friends output.

Sorry for being unclear. I understand that this is not a common configuration, I just assumed that because installing release candidates isn’t something for users without experience, the configuration would be clear.

I am using one hard drive with two partitions: One for /boot and one as a LVM (logical volume management, one of the options the openSUSE installer offers you). The LVM partition is composed of a partition for /, one for /home and one for swap.

To continue my “story-telling” more clearly, I formated my entire hard disk in order to make the current setup. I installed openSUSE 12.3 RC1, mounting the partitions in the way I’ve described above. After configuring that system, and also confirming that I was able to access things like USB sticks, DVDs and my LAN and WLAN network, I installed openSUSE 12.2 by creating an additional logical volume on my LVM partition. In the 12.2 installation, this volume was mounted as /. In 12.3 RC1, it wasn’t mounted at all. Following this, neither openSUSE 12.3 nor 12.2 was able to access the network, USB sticks, or DVDs.

Here’s the outputs from

fdisk -l

and

lvdisplay

# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 480.1 GB, 480103981056 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 58369 cylinders, total 937703088 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0002a996

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *        2048      321535      159744   83  Linux
/dev/sda2          321536   937701375   468689920   8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/mapper/system-home: 456.3 GB, 456315109376 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 55477 cylinders, total 891240448 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/mapper/system-root: 21.5 GB, 21474836480 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 2610 cylinders, total 41943040 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/mapper/system-swap: 2147 MB, 2147483648 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 261 cylinders, total 4194304 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

# lvdisplay                                                              
  --- Logical volume ---                                                                      
  LV Path                /dev/system/home                                                     
  LV Name                home                                                                 
  VG Name                system                                                               
  LV UUID                9Wnui8-pmRp-Qn3C-kuvR-ilYV-yKtk-bAXvMf
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Creation host, time , 
  LV Status              available
  # open                 1
  LV Size                424.98 GiB
  Current LE             108794
  Segments               2
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     3072
  Block device           253:0
   
  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Path                /dev/system/root
  LV Name                root
  VG Name                system
  LV UUID                O3UN1g-LZyJ-zYaP-3tHv-2S2l-MwWK-t50Zf9
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Creation host, time , 
  LV Status              available
  # open                 1
  LV Size                20.00 GiB
  Current LE             5120
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     3072
  Block device           253:1
   
  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Path                /dev/system/swap
  LV Name                swap
  VG Name                system
  LV UUID                8TdNa5-dWAi-8cSn-KXWU-tELE-geYS-mT46uf
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Creation host, time , 
  LV Status              available
  # open                 2
  LV Size                2.00 GiB
  Current LE             512
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           253:2


As you can see, both from the fact that I’m writing in a forum on the Internet and due to my partitions, I’ve currently got network access again. I did this by deleting the openSUSE 12.2 logical volume and upgrading the 12.3 installation using the upgrade option on the 12.3 install DVD.

Output you provided shows only three volumes. There is no fourth volume at all. By default openSUSE installs into volume group “system”, so it looks like you have overwritten your first installation with second. Or you omitted some steps you had done.

I am using one hard drive with two partitions: One for /boot and one as a LVM (logical volume management, one of the options the openSUSE installer offers you). The LVM partition is composed of a partition for /, one for /home and one for swap.

Part of the understanding problem seems to ly in the fact that you use terms on the wrong places. From bottom to top:
. you have a disk partitioned in two partitions, one for /boot and one for LVM.
. That one partition for LVM is then made into a LVM Physical Volume (PV).
. That PV is used in an LVM Volume Group (VG) (the VG does exist of only one PV).
. That VG is split up in three Logical Volumes (LV), one for swap, one for / and one for /home.
To me it looks as if you call an LV a “partition” and that makes you more or less ununderstandable.
Also, as avidjaar says already, there no “additional LV” as you seem to think.

Now can you please try to tell what you installed on this. And be aware of the fact that yoiu can only have either 12.2 or 12.3 on the system as it is. Not both (sounds maybe a bit strange that I have to say this, but your story leads me into believing that you might think otherwise.

And indeed, if you succeeded in installing 12.3, then installing 12.2 goes in the same way, except that you now already have the /boot partition and those three LVs and thus must tell the installer to use them correctly. And that is where avidjaar points you to, if I am correct.

BTW (and I am a little sarcastic here :frowning: ), using LVM “isn’t something for users without experience”.

Alright, I why that was unclear, sorry about that. I might note that in my second post I did note that the output I posted was after removing the LV for 12.2, since it was the one that seemed to be causing my problems.

I think maybe I was ununderstandable on that point too? Of course I know that you can’t have 12.3 and 12.2 running on the same partition or logical volume. I did believe, though, that it would be possible to install them in a dual-boot configuration. I’ve had enough dual-boot configurations in the past (for the last few years I’ve only had openSUSE, but before that I had openSUSE and Ubuntu on the same hard disk, both bootable, and before that I had openSUSE and Windows) to justify that assumption, I think. As long as the root partitions are installed on different volumes - whether they’re physical volumes or logical volumes - I don’t understand why they should affect each other’s behavior.

That’s the way I see it too. That’s also what I did. These are my steps, exactly:

  1. Create the two PVs
  2. Assign one to /boot and make the other a LVM
  3. Split the LVM VG into three LVs - swap, / and /home
  4. Install 12.3 onto /, mount the first PV as /boot, mount the swap LV as swap, mount the /home LV as /home
  5. Configure 12.3
  6. Test 12.3 and confirm that everything works
  7. Create an additional LV for 12.2
  8. Install 12.2 on the new LV, mount the /boot PV as /boot, swap as swap and /home as /home (everything’s shared except for /)
  9. Start 12.2 and notice that it doesn’t recognize USB or network adapters
  10. Start 12.3 and notice that it also doesn’t recognize USB or network adapters any more
  11. Delete the LV where I installed 12.2
  12. “Upgrade” the 12.3 installation using the same configuration as described in step (4), using the installation DVD
  13. Start 12.3 and confirm that everything works - it does!

Alright, I feel like I need to make something clear - I’m not trying to start some kind of passive-agressive flame war here. I’ve just felt like you’re jumping down my throat in both your posts. If I’m understanding you wrong, I’m sorry about that. I’m not trying to **** you or anybody else off.

My system’s working fine now, with 12.3, and I am also doing my best to contribute to the community by testing the next releases. Since I only have one hard disk, I’d like to have the stable and the next release installed in a dual-boot configuration. I think that there might be some other people who’re interested in this and it’s definitely an interesting phenomenon that two root partitions that don’t mount each other should interfere with each other. That’s why I’m asking here. I don’t see why that should offend anyone and I’m not trying to offend anybody any way else - in fact, I’m trying to help. I could drop the issue, since my computer’s running fine now, but I’m trying to get to the bottom of the problem so that future users won’t be confronted with the same problem. So can’t we all just get along? :wink:

It seems that you have no problem now anymore, thus we can come to the conclusion that further discussion has no use.

Nevertheless, because you took the time to make an extensive post, I will also spent some time in answering. As you mention several aspects, technical and otherwise, I will below try to answer/comment one som of what you posted without this being in sequence.

First I (at least) do not think you are trying to start a flame war or whatever. I only think you have problem which you can not realy describe in an excat and precise manner so other technical people can understand is. I try to get you in providing this strict technical information in technical correct wording and, wherever possible, backed by hard computer facts in the hope that then people can start understanding and helping you. That you may have felt that stressing this feels for you as if “I am jumping down youra throat”, for that I appoligize, but as I try to get you to provide technical excat info asap, to help you asap and not to loose time and spoil time of you, others and me, I may be a bit short.

I find it very laudable that you want to contribute to FOSS and openSUSE in particular by testing new levels. But what I do not understand is that after you found a problem, you destroyed all evidence and then reported something where nobody can ask you for any further technical information details, because you simply haven’t the faulty system any more. IMHO thus you make a useless error report.

So part of the misunderstanding here is probably due to the fact that people here could not understand that you destroyed all you are talking about and started anew. Now apperently not having any problem at all.

And last, please realy try to come to terms with the correct wording. The steps you describe are real nonsense when taken litteraly:

  1. Create the two PVs (you probably mean: two partitions)
  2. Assign one to /boot and make the other a LVM (you probably mean: make it into a PV and that PV into a VG)
  3. Split the LVM VG into three LVs - swap, / and /home
  4. Install 12.3 onto /, mount the first PV as /boot, mount the swap LV as swap, mount the /home LV as /home (mount the first partition as /root, and the three LVs as …)
  5. Configure 12.3
  6. Test 12.3 and confirm that everything works
  7. Create an additional LV for 12.2 (where, on the same VG?)
  8. Install 12.2 on the new LV, mount the /boot PV as /boot, swap as swap and /home as /home (everything’s shared except for /) (apart that /boot is not on a PV, but on a partition, I can understand that now)
  9. Start 12.2 and notice that it doesn’t recognize USB or network adapters (and of course from here you should have posted in the Pre-Release/Beta forum to report, then there would have been a change that it can be debugged, repaired and all on time before 12.3 is released, now we have nothing)
  10. Start 12.3 and notice that it also doesn’t recognize USB or network adapters any more
  11. Delete the LV where I installed 12.2
  12. “Upgrade” the 12.3 installation using the same configuration as described in step (4), using the installation DVD
  13. Start 12.3 and confirm that everything works - it does!

My remarks in red.
Note that when you would have posted this step by step in your first post in this thread, the starting point to study this phenomenon would have been much better for everybody. Most of it would probably have been understood notwithstanding you using PV for partition. Or else easily have been found out with some asking. But that is talking about “how it could have been”.

Wishing success in using openSUSE.

shared /boot does not really work. Better keep them separate.

Yes, now as we begin to understand what the OP was doing, this looks very strange indeed.

I see two possibilities:

  1. /boot was re-formatted through the installation, in which case he will have the 12.2 kernel irresoective of what / partition he uses;
  2. /boot was not re-formatted, in which case it is a mess where I will not even try to understand what may happen.

In any case, he calls this “multiple-boot” in one of his posts. IMHO this construct is not something that will come to the mind of many people here when they hear/read the wording “multiple boot”.