Need openSuse donwload for pentium3 with 256 mb ram

Hi,
I want open suse enterprise downloadble for pentium 3 with 256 mb ram
Any Help or pointer is welcome
Gibu John

gibujohn 2011 wrote:

>
> Hi,
> I want open suse enterprise downloadble for pentium 3 with 256 mb ram
>
There is no openSUSE enterprise. You can try to install openSUSE or you can
buy the enterprise versions SLES and SLED.

Your hardware will not be sufficient for the heavy default desktop
environments KDE or Gnome, but you may want to try a light environment like
LXDE on it.
To install for example LXDE you can use the dvd.
http://software.opensuse.org/114/en (you will need the 32bit version).


PC: oS 11.4 (dual boot 12.1 RC2) 64 bit | Intel Core i7-2600@3.40GHz | KDE
4.6.0 | GeForce GT 420 | 16GB Ram
Eee PC 1201n: oS 11.4 64 bit | Intel Atom 330@1.60GHz | KDE 4.6.0 | nVidia
ION | 3GB Ram

in addition to Martin’s post i offer:

all SUSE Enterprise is downloadable from http://www.suse.com/download-linux/

i do not know the hardware requirements for the enterprise systems, but
the requirements for openSUSE is here:
http://en.opensuse.org/Hardware_requirements and the free downloads are
available here: http://software.opensuse.org/

if you tell us what you intend to use the system for (command line only
server or desktop system) maybe we can help better…

well, if you want a desktop with only 256 mb ram, you need not try to
install either openSUSE or SUSE Linux Enterprise, instead you need to
look at a distribution made to need less hardware…see my old post
here: http://tinyurl.com/ylf8zq9 where several of those are listed…if
it were me i would begin by downloading installing Puppy linux
<http://www.puppylinux.org/>

let us know how you get on…


DD
http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

DenverD wrote:

> i do not know the hardware requirements for the enterprise systems
512 MB RAM minimum for SLES
http://www.suse.com/products/server/technical-information/#System

otherwise I completely support the point of view to use a specialized distro
for old hardware (there are good reasons why such linux distributions exist
and not only the mainstream ones).


PC: oS 11.4 (dual boot 12.1 RC2) 64 bit | Intel Core i7-2600@3.40GHz | KDE
4.6.0 | GeForce GT 420 | 16GB Ram
Eee PC 1201n: oS 11.4 64 bit | Intel Atom 330@1.60GHz | KDE 4.6.0 | nVidia
ION | 3GB Ram

On 2011-11-08 10:06, gibujohn 2011 wrote:
>
> Hi,
> I want open suse enterprise downloadble for pentium 3 with 256 mb ram

There is no such thing as “open suse enterprise”. There is the “SUSE
Enterprise” versions, ie, SLES / SLED, and there is the free (gratis)
version, ie openSUSE.

These are the openSUSE forums. For the enterprise SUSE versions, there are
different forums at Novell. Ask them.

You might succeed installing if prior to the attempt you create a swap
partition.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

GNOME2 on will be OK with 256MB RAM, it’s not heavier on RAM than XFCE.

Just disable tracker, gnome-do, tomboy, packagekit updater and some other useless stuff installed by default and you can get to under-90MB RAM usage on startup easily.
That said, XFCE would be probably better, and LXDE best on this setup.

For more demanding applications you can use compcache with large (128MB+) buffer for better performance.

I used to run SUSE 11.4 with G2 on my VIA C3 server and it’s comparable in RAM usage with XFCE, and LXDE is indeed lighter than both of them, but not much (~maybe 10MB).
You can save more memory by running lightweight applications (risretto, xfburn, midori) instead of default gnome apps

On 2011-11-08 13:46, sobrus wrote:
> GNOME2 on 11.4 will be OK with 256MB RAM, it’s not much lighter on RAM
> than XFCE.

Yes, the system will run, or walk, but the installer will not.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Carlos E. R. wrote:
>
> Yes, the system will run, or walk, but the installer will not.
>
in text mode the installer should work (it will probably complain).


PC: oS 11.4 (dual boot 12.1 RC2) 64 bit | Intel Core i7-2600@3.40GHz | KDE
4.6.0 | GeForce GT 420 | 16GB Ram
Eee PC 1201n: oS 11.4 64 bit | Intel Atom 330@1.60GHz | KDE 4.6.0 | nVidia
ION | 3GB Ram

Hi,

in the topic of your posting you didn’t mention ‘enterprise’, but you did in the text of your posting.

Well, if you run an enterprise, it would probably be wise to invest a bit money to get at least a used Core2 Duo PC.
Then an enterprise version of SUSE, for which you pay, would make more sense.
Running an enterprise you would anyway have the requirement that your system works.

If, on the other hand, you would like to set up a file server consuming little electricity: I can’t tell you much about that
except that I’ve seen (but not read) articles on that in computer journals.

If your’re looking for an openSUSE version:

Personnally I am currently running openSUSE 11.2 with the early 4 version 4.3.5 of KDE
on a PC with

  • Pentium III (Katmai) at 450 MHz
  • 512 MB RAM
  • onboard graphics on an
  • old Intel Motherboard originally designed for Pentium II (which in this case as well means
    that the graphics consumes part of the RAM available).

Over time I worked with 2-4 GB of virtual memory (i.e. backed up on the harddisk).

I’m sometimes still running openSUSE 10.2 from one of three harddisks in order to be able to
burn CDs using CD burners attached by an external SCSI bus.

WWW, eMail & classical jobs (office, copying etc.), on the other hand, are done under
openSUSE 11.2.

OK, the system clearly is not a Ferrari.

But it works.
And I’m confident, that openSUSE 11.4 will run as well, at a reasonable (not fast) speed.

Which version of openSUSE you could download from where, see:
openSUSE Download Mirrors - Overview

For older versions it may as well be useful to ask a friend, if he doesn’t have a DVD from
some computer journal with the respective version on it.

Good luck
Mike

On 11/09/2011 10:36 PM, ratzi wrote:
> OK, the system clearly is not a Ferrari.

not only is it not a Ferrari it is no longer supported with security
patches and therefore wouldn’t pass the road worthy safety and security
tests which a VW would have to pass before being driven on the roadways
of the majority modern societies…

pull that old heap off the road until it meets safety inspection
requirements…or is upgraded to a supported version…

of course, if you are a mechanic and have (somehow) compiled all the
kernel and other software patches for your old VW, then ok…

otherwise you are open for a cracker to break in and turn yours into a
nice control/server node for their WindoZombie Farm…


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

On an old Compaq v300 laptop with 256 MB and a Celeron 400 I went with AntiX Linux and icewm window manager. It was all I get get to work satisfactorily but works great. Most all distros will run on my other laptop with 512 MB but not with 256.

The Compaq has about 200 MB free right after booting AntiX! After starting FF 7 still over 100 MB free.

On the 512 MB laptop I am running Suse 11.4 with Xfce. Found that Xfce saved considerable memory over KDE or LXDE.

stevektm125 wrote:

>
> On an old Compaq v300 laptop with 256 MB and a Celeron 400 I went with
> AntiX Linux and icewm window manager. It was all I get get to work
> satisfactorily but works great. Most all distros will run on my other
> laptop with 512 MB but not with 256.
>
> The Compaq has about 200 MB free right after booting AntiX! After
> starting FF 7 still over 100 MB free.
>
+1 for AntiX

I tested AntiX with Fluxbox (I think two years ago or so) on a 300 MHz
Pentium with 192 MB RAM and it worked surprisingly good (it was an old
Motherboard I decided to play with for fun just before I threw it away).
Also plain Debian 5 with Lxde worked well there (that was before there was a
Debian 6).
So there are still good options for old hardware available with supported
Linux distributions.


PC: oS 11.4 (dual boot 12.1 RC2) 64 bit | Intel Core i7-2600@3.40GHz | KDE
4.6.0 | GeForce GT 420 | 16GB Ram
Eee PC 1201n: oS 11.4 64 bit | Intel Atom 330@1.60GHz | KDE 4.6.0 | nVidia
ION | 3GB Ram

Hi DenverD,

You don’t want to tell me that the firewall in openSUSE doesn’t work, do you?
That doesn’t depend on the type of hardware, or does it?

In one aspect you’re very right: openSUSE 11.2 (the software) seems
to be outdated, just as my current hardware, and the new versions of
openSUSE, and particularly the new versions of the web browsers included
in that version, include recent security patches.

But security (not speed) does in the end depend on the software,
not the hardware.

What about flash player?
I excluded its installation.
But what’s otherwise about the security of flash player,
regardless if you’re using a faster or a slower system?

Best wishes
Mike

On 11/10/2011 11:16 PM, ratzi wrote:
>
> You don’t want to tell me that the firewall in openSUSE doesn’t work,
> do you?

is it your understanding that the default firewall installed by 11.2 is
all the security measures you need to take?

if that is true, then why oh why have there been several (how many i
can’t say, but several) security patches made to the kernel, and
browsers, and pdf readers…see, when you browse you ask for and ALLOW
stuff to come through your firewall and into your system…there
are security problems in several different areas of the default
11.2…known and exploitable security problems which have been patched
in newer versions of the software you are running…

> That doesn’t depend on the type of hardware, or does it?

i don’t understand your question: because, out of date software with
known and exploitable deficiencies is a problem–no matter what hardware
it is on!!

> In one aspect you’re very right: openSUSE 11.2 (the software) seems
> to be outdated, just as my current hardware, and the new versions of
> openSUSE, and particularly the new versions of the web browsers
> included in that version, include recent security patches.

right.

> But security (not speed) does in the end depend on the software,
> not the hardware.

security depends on many thing besides software…for example, a perfect
software set which is wrongly administered is insecure…

>
> What about flash player?
> I excluded its installation.

i do not offhand remember if flash has had a security patch since 11.2
went outdated or not…

> But what’s otherwise about the security of flash player,
> regardless if you’re using a faster or a slower system?

i do not understand your focus on this issue…

imo, your operating system is no longer supported and should be upgraded
or taken off the net…

there are three alternatives i can think of:

  1. manually compile and install all security patched applications and
    components of your openSUSE 11.2 system…

  2. join Evergreen <http://tinyurl.com/4aflkpy>

  3. install a distribution which is targeted for old and/or resource
    limited hardware which is fully security patched…Puppy springs to
    mine…it fits and is safe to use on your hardware…


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

Dear DenverD,

at the end of the day I refer to your statement

You may even have written that in a sense of humor.

Look, I don’t have another PC, currently.

The reasons for that as well comprise the relatively high
power consumption of Pentium4 or many AMD processors,
used PC’s with which may be cheap now.

And besides, how fast is an Intel Atom, which seems to have been
sold in numbers?

I myself don’t enjoy the relatively slow pace at which my PC works.
But in the end it does work, and it does satisfy most of my needs.

Referring again to your statements:

I never intended to use my PC as a server.
And believe it or not, I’m still going online by a 56k modem.

Bandwidth is very limited then, which even makes online updates
of openSUSE difficult.

On the other hand, besides all inconvenience, this has one advantage:
Kinternet, which I use to connect, directly shows every network activity
to me on the desktop, i.e. permanently, or all the time.

This gives me reason to be quite sure that my current openSUSE 11.2
isn’t corrupted in any way, because I just do not observe any network activity
when it shouldn’t take place.

This is simple.

Best wishes
Mike

Am 11.11.2011 22:16, schrieb ratzi:
>
> Dear DenverD,
>
> at the end of the day I refer to your statement
>
> DenverD;2402396 Wrote:
>> On 11/09/2011 10:36 PM, ratzi wrote:
>>> OK, the system clearly is not a Ferrari.
>>
>> not only is it not a Ferrari it is no longer supported with
>> security patches and therefore wouldn’t pass the road worthy safety
>> and security tests which a VW would have to pass before being
>> driven on the roadways of the majority modern societies…
>>
>> pull that old heap off the road until it meets safety inspection
>> requirements…or is upgraded to a supported version…
>
> You may even have written that in a sense of humor.
>
> Look, I don’t have another PC, currently.
>
> The reasons for that as well comprise the relatively high power
> consumption of Pentium4 or many AMD processors, used PC’s with which
> may be cheap now.
>
> And besides, how fast is an Intel Atom, which seems to have been sold
> in numbers?
>
> I myself don’t enjoy the relatively slow pace at which my PC works.
> But in the end it does work, and it does satisfy most of my needs.
>
> Referring again to your statements:
>
> I never intended to use my PC as a server. And believe it or not, I’m
> still going online by a 56k modem.
>
> Bandwidth is very limited then, which even makes online updates of
> openSUSE difficult.
>
> On the other hand, besides all inconvenience, this has one
> advantage: Kinternet, which I use to connect, directly shows every
> network activity to me on the desktop, i.e. permanently, or all the
> time.
>
> This gives me reason to be quite sure that my current openSUSE 11.2
> isn’t corrupted in any way, because I just do not observe any
> network activity when it shouldn’t take place.
>
> This is simple.
>
> Best wishes Mike
>

Nonetheless I would recommend to use the evergreen 11.2 repositories for
an even improved security. Evergreen will not pull in a tremendous
amount of updates so it is I think suitable for your low bandwidth
situation (it may be that at the very beginning some larger updates will
arrive but after that it will be a very low traffic thing).
Just think about it.
http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Evergreen (supports 11.1 and 11.2)


PC: oS 11.4 (dual boot 12.1) 64 bit | Intel Core i7-2600@3.40GHz | KDE
4.6.0 | GeForce GT 420 | 16GB Ram
Eee PC 1201n: oS 11.4 64 bit | Intel Atom 330@1.60GHz | KDE 4.7.3 |
nVidia ION | 3GB Ram

On 11/11/2011 10:16 PM, ratzi wrote:
>
> This gives me reason to be quite sure that my current openSUSE 11.2
> isn’t corrupted in any way, because I just do not observe any network
> activity when it shouldn’t take place.

do as you wish…but, it really is EASY to join Evergreen and protect
your system…

you don’t get it that i am trying to HELP you.


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

Dear DenverD,

thank you for the links.

Another aspect is the saying: Never change a running system.

My next point on the agenda would be to install openSUSE 11.4,
for which I have a install DVD meanwhile.

But my daughter currently is preparing a presentation in school
using open office that came with openSUSE 11.2.

So I’ll have to wait until she has given her presentation.
Whether I like it or not.

Yours
Mike

On Fri, 11 Nov 2011 23:06:03 +0000, ratzi wrote:

> But my daughter currently is preparing a presentation in school using
> open office that came with openSUSE 11.2.
>
> So I’ll have to wait until she has given her presentation. Whether I
> like it or not.

Actually, OpenOffice files created in 11.2 can be opened with LibreOffice
in 11.4. One option to test this out would be to grab the 11.4 LiveCD
and try it out, opening the presentation file with the updated version
and making sure it opens OK.

Just saying, there is an option if you don’t want to wait.

As for the principle “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” - that applies to
a lot of things, but sadly not computer OSes. Just because it seems OK
doesn’t mean there aren’t security issues that need to be patched - and
with something like 11.2, no security updates have been released since it
stopped being supported.

Which means any security issues discovered since then would not be
patched on your system.

Evergreen gives you an option to at least get security patches so those
prospective issues that might allow someone from outside to hack your
system could be fixed.

In the end, it’s your system and you have to live with the potential
consequences of not updating it. Only you can make that risk assessment
for you. The rest of us can advise, though, based on our experiences -
and that’s what DD and others are doing.

It’s nothing personal - it’s about propagating best practices and helping
you be secure.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

Dear Jim,

thank you for your advice.

I’m using openSUSE for several years now, and I’m very happy
that there never has been an indication concerning worms,
trojans and the like.

And be assured that I don’t intend to stick to 11.2 for ever.

But I prever to wait for about 1-2 weeks before installing 11.4
(it’ll be a clean install, i.e. after formatting the root partition).

I’m probably really conservative:
I still have an old openSUSE 10.2 running as another system
on my PC, because it doesen’t pose problems burning CDs
using CD burners attached by a SCSI bus.

But, on the other hand, I never intended to go online again
with that old 10.2 (which, with a modem or even with an ethernet
connection by cable is quite easy to ensure).

Wish you all the best
Mike