Need a mail program...

So, after over 10 years, I’m ditching KMail.

I just can’t take Akonadi anymore. After a few hours of running, it just sucks the life out of my system. If I need to run Akonadi to run KMail, then I’m done with Kmail.

So, I’ve got 10+ years of mail stored in maildir format, and I need a new mail program. I’d like to stick with something KDE friendly if possible, but I’ll take what I can get.

I have been using mozilla’s Thunderbird which has been working very well for me and no need for Akonadi to run to use it. I have no idea about converting or moving over a bunch of old mail however. What were you thinking you wanted to do there?

Thank You,

I’d like to convert the old mail over, if possible. If I have to export it, I will, not a problem.

There seems to be several links on the subject. Here are a couple. It is always a challenge to know how the current version works if the articles are old.

TiJaJoMa: How to import Kmail into Thunderbird (and vice versa)

https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird:Help_Documentation:Migrating_to_Mozilla_Thunderbird

Still it looks like there may be a solution for you. Why not load and configure Thunderbird first and see if you want to go any further. It makes no sense to worry about a conversion if you do not like the program to begin with.

Thank You,

There is also Claws Mail. It is quite quick and small, you almost don’t notice it at all.

On 2010-10-04 04:06, jdmcdaniel3 wrote:

> Still it looks like there may be a solution for you. Why not load and
> configure Thunderbird first and see if you want to go any further. It
> makes no sense to worry about a conversion if you do not like the
> program to begin with.

The conversion can be done by using an intermediate IMAP server. From the old program, you copy all
mail to the server, in folders (one by one, or all). Then, import the folders in the new program.

You can, also, keep a local IMAP server, and then you can see the emails from any program you like,
choosing one each time. Kmail, evince, thunderbird… whatever. All using the same folders. Mind:
not importing, but using. One central storage place, the imap server in your own computer.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

Hey Carlos, what a neat idea! You are truly the go-to person for email!

Johnnycat, I’ve been using evolution. It’s a Gnome app but it has worked well in KDE for me. I like it because it’s a complete suite. Address book has complete information including a place for pictures of your contacts, which show up in your mail messages. I don’t use the calendar functions or the scheduling but it has all the features you should need in the mail section.

I had a serious problem with Thunderbird, concerning lost mail, that has given me a bad taste. It was a while ago but I can’t seem to get past it. Of course, a whole lot of people use Tbird with much success. The problem’s mine I guess, not Tbird.

Bart

i think there are dozens of e-mail clients out there you just have to choose the one you like best Program finder - Softpedia

asking this forum to choose an email client for you will only endup people shouting out there favorite email programs and wont give yu any advice what email program fits best for you.

I second that choice. Claws Mail is a fork of sylpheed (the one I use). They both do anything an e-mail client is supposed to do (not more) and are extremly lightweight - if you compared them with programs like thunderbird.

Very good idea! How do you configure a local IMAP server?

If you want to use a free public one, Gmail provides for IMAP connection. That’s what I use so that whether I’m at work (web), on the desktop (Thunderbird or Evolution) or my laptop (Thunderbird or KMail) I am getting the same email and don’t have to go running around trying to remember where I downloaded that message!

I know that, but I suppose that it’s different from having a local IMAP server in your own computer, as Carlos says.

You don’t even need a local IMAP server. You can use fetchmail (in a cron job or I guess it works as a daemon too - not sure under openSUSE). Then you get you emails in your local mail account’s directory (or file) and you can open it with any email client … from ‘mail’ in console to thunderbird.

Biggest difference I see is that when getting your mail from a local one, you don’t have to use up bandwidth connecting to a remote one and you are in full control. That’s why I use Gmail, because I don’t know beans about setting up and maintaining an IMAP server, or setting the server for external access.

jonnycat26 may be more capable than me (not a high bar to hurdle :wink: ).

I, too, am using claws mail. I install nmh for command line mail, and claws mail for GUI mail accessing the same messages.

I’m not sure how claws will work with maildir messages, but since nmh messages are also one message per file, one directory per folder, the worst that could happen is that you might have to rename the messages to numbers. Probably a simple script could rename them to their inode numbers, and then “folder -pack” in nmh would resequence them.

On 2010-10-05 17:06, please try again wrote:
>
> wrbbt;2233491 Wrote:
>> Very good idea! How do you configure a local IMAP server?
>
> You don’t even need a local IMAP server. You can use fetchmail (in a

Yes, but no. Without an imap server you can not easily share folders beetween serveral mail clients.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

On 2010-10-05 16:36, wrbbt wrote:
>
> Carlos E. R.;2233241 Wrote:

> Very good idea! How do you configure a local IMAP server?

THAT is a good question >:-)

Till now, I used wu-imap, but it has disappeared from the distribution. It used no configuration, it
was really simple.

Now, I’m looking at dovecot. I can’t give you advice on how to do it, as it is something I still
haven’t done. It is in my To-Do list O:-)

Things can get very complicated. :slight_smile:

You can have an imap server, alone. You can still get your mail using your preferred program; the
trick is to move mails to folders in the local imap server instead of using local folders in the
mail client program. This I think is easy to do.

Or, you can use a downloader like fetchmail, feed mails to postfix, amavis, spamasassin (the lot),
procmail, dovecot/cyrus/courier/whatever. Which is more complex. I have this, without the imap
server, so I intend to complete it - when I can, meaning, one day I feel optimistic enough :wink:

Now, about using a public imap server, like gmail. Yes, it works. However, the bandwith is much
lower than a local one on the same machine. It has to be.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

Saludos también para ti.

If sometime you find time to do it, post your experience, please. It’ll be useful for other people.
Anyway, it’s already useful the information you provide in your post.
Cheers.

Or could you put it up in the Wiki or OMG! Suse!, somewhere easy to use and reference?

On 2010-10-05 20:36, wrbbt wrote:
>
> Saludos también para ti.
>
> If sometime you find time to do it, post your experience, please. It’ll
> be useful for other people.
> Anyway, it’s already useful the information you provide in your post.

Here goes - I just did it. Works perfect! :slight_smile:

In fact, it is really simple.

First I’ll describe my existing setup. Mail is downloaded from several accounts using fetchmail.
This passes them over to postfix, fitered with amavis-new, and then to procmail, which after
filtering with spamassassin, distributes the email on local folders under ~/Mail/*. My main MUA is
Pine, but I can also read the mail with thunderbird sharing the same mbox folders - the problem is
that read marks are not shared. And to read them in the laptop I needed things like nfs to share the
mail folder.

So… here comes dovecot.

Procedure:

  • Install it with Yast.
  • Edit “/usr/share/doc/packages/dovecot/dovecot-openssl.cnf”. It doesn’t really matter if you are
    going to use the dovecot server internally, we are going to create a local certificate without using
    a certificate authority - this is needed if we want to connect to imap from another computer
    (security of transmissions).
  • Run “/usr/share/doc/packages/dovecot/mkcert.sh”
  • Edit “/etc/dovecot/dovecot.conf”. The file is profusely documented with comments. The defaults
    suffice, with few changes (trick: I mark the changes with my initials):

SSL/TLS support: yes, no, required. <doc/wiki/SSL.txt>

#ssl = no
#CER
ssl = yes

Uncomment in the next paragraph the location of the certificates (public and private)

Adjust for your local mail setup: note that all users have to use the same config. In theory dovecot
finds it out automatically… dunno. It did not work fine with me.

#mail_location =
#CER
mail_location = mbox:~/Mail:INBOX=/var/mail/%u

This means that there is a file in “/var/mail/USERNAME” that gets new email (procmail puts it there,
default rule), and that I have local user storage in “/home/USERNAME/Mail/” as mbox files.

Make this temporary change:

#mail_debug = no
#Cer
mail_debug = yes

And that’s all! :slight_smile:

Just start the service (rcdovecot start), and try it with your favorite mail client. With
Thunderbird, if there are many folders, you need to subscribe to them. The mail client may warn that
the certificate is not verifiable. That’s ok, you trust yourself, the certificate is your own. It is
only an issue if you create a public server - and then these notes are not for you.

Ah, and you need to open port “imap” in your susefirewall2 config - if you want to connect from a
computer in your local network.


Some notes. If your setup is different, like for example, you get your email with kmail, evolution,
thunderbird… well, you have different alternatives. The cute thing about dovecot is that it can
use existing local folders (my case) in several formats (mbox, maildir, dbox) or create its own. You
can tell dovecot where your local storage is (the same for all users), or use a different storage
from the existing one, and them move the email there using your mail client.

Thunderbird has its email inside ./thunderbird/GARBLED.default/Mail. Leave it there. Configure
dovecot with a global setting like mine, add the imap server in Th, copy and later delete all your
email folders. That’s it. Be sure to configure thunderbird to not keep a cached copy of it - it is
very inefficient, would use several times your local disk-space.

Later, you could add filters that move your incoming email to your new loal imap server.

<http://wiki2.dovecot.org/MailboxFormat>

Dovecot in openSUSE 11.2 is version 1.2.9, but they have a version 2 with improvements. One of them
is the folder format “dbox”, which is a high performance mixture of mbox and maildir. Very interesting.

More documentation:

] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dovecot_(software)
]
] http://wiki.dovecot.org/FrontPage?action=fullsearch&context=180&value=procmail&fullsearch=Text
]
] Procmail
]
]
http://wiki.dovecot.org/QuestionsAndAnswers?highlight=(procmail)#I_just_used_procmail_to_populate_a_bunch_of_folders_while_migrating_to_dovecot._The_directories_and_files_are_there.2C_but_nothing_shows_up_in_imap_clients.21
]
]

(I have not needed to use what it says about procmail)

http://wiki.dovecot.org/
http://wiki2.dovecot.org/

Perhaps there is more to say… dunno. Ask, I’ll answer if I know.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)