mysterious "bloat" in home directory -- source??

Hello, everyone. Unusual problem here.

I started using SuSE 11.0 about two weeks ago. I do regular backups of my home directory to an external USB hard drive. Only SuSE on this computer.

Today I did a backup and discovered that my home directory had suddenly more than doubled in size. I am at a loss to explain how seemingly overnight the amount of information in the home directory increased. Now wondering if there is something hidden that’s inflating file sizes or adding files I don’t see and don’t know where to look for.

On January 3 my home directory was 19.3GB
On January 6 it was 20.7 GB
On January 8 it was 20.0 GB
On January 10 it was 20.0 GB
And today it is 41.2 GB! :open_mouth:

In the past three days I have downloaded some e-mails (usual stuff, nothing unusual). I did add one powerpoint presentation that is 13.5 MB, but that’s the ONLY thing of any size I’ve consciously added to my home directory. Even if I cannot remember downloading a file or two, there is no way I added anything close to 20GB of information to my home directory in the past three days.

I have done quite a bit of updating to SuSE through the package manager, and I recognize that some information is added to “dot” files in the home directory, but I’m assuming that the majority of the updating went into / rather than into /home.

So, how to I find the “bloat” so that I can stop it from filling my hard drive? Is there a way to compare the most recent backup against a prior one to see where there are differences?

Thanks!
socref

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Post the output from:

du -h ~

Good luck.

socref wrote:
> Hello, everyone. Unusual problem here.
>
> I started using SuSE 11.0 about two weeks ago. I do regular backups of
> my home directory to an external USB hard drive. Only SuSE on this
> computer.
>
> Today I did a backup and discovered that my home directory had suddenly
> more than doubled in size. I am at a loss to explain how seemingly
> overnight the amount of information in the home directory increased. Now
> wondering if there is something hidden that’s inflating file sizes or
> adding files I don’t see and don’t know where to look for.
>
> On January 3 my home directory was 19.3GB
> On January 6 it was 20.7 GB
> On January 8 it was 20.0 GB
> On January 10 it was 20.0 GB
> And today it is 41.2 GB! :open_mouth:
>
> In the past three days I have downloaded some e-mails (usual stuff,
> nothing unusual). I did add one powerpoint presentation that is 13.5 MB,
> but that’s the ONLY thing of any size I’ve consciously added to my home
> directory. Even if I cannot remember downloading a file or two, there is
> no way I added anything close to 20GB of information to my home
> directory in the past three days.
>
> I have done quite a bit of updating to SuSE through the package
> manager, and I recognize that some information is added to “dot” files
> in the home directory, but I’m assuming that the majority of the
> updating went into / rather than into /home.
>
> So, how to I find the “bloat” so that I can stop it from filling my
> hard drive? Is there a way to compare the most recent backup against a
> prior one to see where there are differences?
>
> Thanks!
> socref
>
>
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Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org

iD8DBQFJbNkh3s42bA80+9kRAuQYAJ9RhtfTb8GaV5E3DticngfEzMUPFACfVgyD
mJ3JyEJUf/c2cE1H1YbHmw4=
=h8ZB
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Hi
Probably beagle files


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
openSUSE 11.1 x86 Kernel 2.6.27.7-9-pae
up 1:33, 2 users, load average: 1.06, 0.36, 0.16
GPU GeForce 6600 TE/6200 TE - Driver Version: 180.22

Run a system tool like kdirstat or filelight – which will show you the space allocation.

I did try to uninstall Beagle when I first loaded SuSE. I apparently missed something since I do see a .beagle folder in my home directory. But the total size showing for that is 22.6 MB.

Thanks!
socref

I looked at the output and I don’t think it itemizes everything. For example, I see no reference to the folder that has my videos and sounds. Other folders are also not noted.

The total size at the end is there, but not all of the pieces.

Does the command selectively list the contents of the home directory?
thx
socref

Can’t. It’s 50,000+ characters and this forum will only allow 10,000 in a post.
socref

Try this:

du ~ | sort -n 

This will sort the files (and folders) by size. The ones at the end will be your biggest files and folders. You should be able to recursively do this to nail down the problem. For instance, if your videos folder seems bigger than it ought to be

 du ~/videos | sort -n 

Hopefully this helps narrow down where the problem is.

Oh, this is too, too funny. Thanks for the suggestion. I ran filelight and the answer was right in front of me. :wink:

I did not realize that when copying the home directory onto another drive the trash bin was also copied along with the good stuff. Since the “trash” folder does not show up as an icon the copied home directory (at least not at the first level) I did not even think to look for it, and i did not realize I was copying the contents of several aborted backups that had been moved into the trash bin.

When I emptied the trash just now my home directory returned to under 20GB.

I feel a bit foolish having copied the trash, but then considering that it’s not visually obvious from the icons I guess I don’t feel stupid. rotfl!

Thanks, everyone. Lesson learned about the trash.
socref

Geez, I keep thinking about how/why I did not realize that “trash” was in my home directory, and that anything not deleted from there was “bloating” my /home partition.

It just seemed logical to me that “trash” was an item that belonged to the system rather than to user. After all, why would anyone making a safety copy of the home directory want to save “trash?” Obviously I did not understand that “trash” is, in fact, part of the home directory, albeit slightly hidden in that the “desktop” folder is not visible from the first level view of the home directory.

Well, I live and learn a little bit more about SuSE each day. :slight_smile:

Someday I might even be dangerous!! rotfl!
socref

I had an ISO file once that I completely overlooked. Talk about obvious… :slight_smile: