Moved to GNOME, first newb doubts

OK, after the previous disaster on KDE I ended up reinstalling whole system, but this time with GNOME.

Looks promising, but I have few first doubts,

How can I disable Apper in GNOME? Or is it more stable than on KDE?
There seem to be 3 console apps: Xterm, GNOME console and something like “Linux 3… console”. Which one is normally used?
Where can I see the amount of used space in each partition (NTFS and Ext4)? KDE had a default access on its desktop for this…

Thanks for your help.

Two more issues:

When hitting Alt+F2 and typing “gnomesu nautilus” to run nautilus as root and be able to write/delete in my NTFS partitions, it did run but with the message “Nautilus could not create file ‘root/config/nautilus…’” or something like that, “make sure you give Nautilus permissions to create this file”. Tried running Nautilus again as root but the error message didn’t display again. What does it mean?

And also, I have the same battery issues than in KDE: when letting it reach 100% while plugged, it goes down to 50% after a brief while. I think it doesn’t happen when unplugging it at 99% (haven’t tried, but it worked on KDE).

try

gnomesu nautilus --no-desktop

Also, if you mount the partition manually do you still need to open a root nautilus to read/write files? I’m just interested, I dont have an ntfs partition to experiment with.

sudo mount /dev/sd[x] /mnt

You will then be able to see your documents from that partition in /mnt

On 02/29/2012 08:06 AM, F style wrote:
> OK, after the previous ‘disaster’ (http://tinyurl.com/7a82o2d) on KDE I
> ended up reinstalling whole system

that is a very “windows-thing” to do! why didn’t you follow the good
advice given to you by caf?

at the very least, go back to that thread and THANK him for his time
taken to lay out your recovery path.


DD
What does DistroWatch write about YOU?: http://tinyurl.com/SUSEonDW

Yes, sorry, I got desperate… but already followed your advise.

Back to topic, what about the other doubts?

On 02/29/2012 08:06 AM, F style wrote:
>
> How can I disable Apper in GNOME? Or is it more stable than on KDE?

i do not know if Apper is included in GNOME, if it is: do NOT use
it…disable or uninstall it…

it it has something else similare to Apper, i would say disable it and
in either case always use YaST Online Update or “zypper patch” to keep
your system up to date with security patches and major bug fixes…

> There seem to be 3 console apps: Xterm, GNOME console and something
> like “Linux 3… console”. Which one is normally used?

like so many things in Linux: use the one you like the best (try
all…but, as i’ve never seen GNOME3 i don’t know what “Linux 3…
console” is…)

> Where can I see the amount of used space in each partition (NTFS and
> Ext4)? KDE had a default access on its desktop for this…

i do not know how to do it in a GUI, but in a terminal, do this:


df -hlT


DD http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat
What does DistroWatch write about YOU?: http://tinyurl.com/SUSEonDW

On 02/29/2012 08:36 AM, F style wrote:
>
> Two more issues:
>
> When hitting Alt+F2 and typing “gnomesu nautilus” to run nautilus as
> root and be able to write/delete in my NTFS partitions, it did run but
> with the message “Nautilus could not create file
> ‘root/config/nautilus…’” or something like that, “make sure you give
> Nautilus permissions to create this file”. Tried running Nautilus again
> as root but the error message didn’t display again. What does it mean?

i guess it means that the first time you tried it, Nautilus tried to
access its config file but since it didn’t yet exist it tried to create
a new config file it ‘knew’ it would need…and it tried to create it in
a place where it had to have root powers to put it, but before you had
put in the password, so it didn’t yet have root powers, so the creation
failed…

but, then the second time you tried it, it found the config file as it
had already been created (while you were using Nautilus the first time)
and so had no complaint…

>
> And also, I have the same battery issues than in KDE: when letting it
> reach 100% while plugged, it goes down to 50% after a brief while. I
> think it doesn’t happen when unplugging it at 99% (haven’t tried, but it
> worked on KDE).

this is a totally different question which is not an ‘application’
question…suggest you ask it in either the hardware or laptop
forum…be sure and give all the necessary hardware/software info…

and, in the future we in these fora usually expect each thread to have
one question, and the jest of that one question referenced in the
subject line (so, for example, the folks who wish to help with laptop
battery anomalies will have an idea what the thread is about, and look in)…


DD http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat
What does DistroWatch write about YOU?: http://tinyurl.com/SUSEonDW

Thanks, I’ll keep it in mind.

Back to topic (Applications questions), does someone know the name of the app/service in charge of automatic updates? Because GNOME doesn’t have Apper installed. And how would I apply the updates manually? I reviewed this thread which was about that topic, but I guess that applied to KDE, because GNOME’s Software Manager looks a bit different…

Hi
It’s the gpk-* set of commands and you will get a notification popup
when updates are about. If you run the command gnome-session-properties
and scroll the list you will also see packagekit as well.


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11 (x86_64) Kernel 3.0.13-0.27-default
up 3 days 14:55, 4 users, load average: 0.04, 0.04, 0.05
CPU Intel i5 CPU M520@2.40GHz | Intel Arrandale GPU

On 02/29/2012 06:06 PM, F style wrote:
>
>
> And how would I apply the updates manually?

just open YaST, and then select Software (on the left) and Online Update
(on the right)…

then when it shows you a list of all the security and recommended
patches (if any) which applies to your system you just need to review
the list of items suggested and approve, or not…


DD http://tinyurl.com/DD-Caveat
What does DistroWatch write about YOU?: http://tinyurl.com/SUSEonDW

On 2012-02-29 08:06, F style wrote:

It is usually better to ask questions separately.

> There seem to be 3 console apps: Xterm, GNOME console and something
> like “Linux 3… console”. Which one is normally used?

The one you like most.

> Where can I see the amount of used space in each partition (NTFS and
> Ext4)?

I use CLI: “df -h”. Or “baobab” as root if you want to see where exactly is
space wasted.

> KDE had a default access on its desktop for this…

Maybe. I do not use such things.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

On 2012-02-29 08:36, F style wrote:
>
> Two more issues:
>
> When hitting Alt+F2 and typing “gnomesu nautilus” to run nautilus as
> root

nautilus is a dangerous program to do that, as it wants to repaint your
desktop.

> and be able to write/delete in my NTFS partitions,

You can do that as user - if you change certain settings. Ask about that,
or search the archive, it has been asked thousands of times >:-)

> And also, I have the same battery issues than in KDE: when letting it
> reach 100% while plugged, it goes down to 50% after a brief while. I
> think it doesn’t happen when unplugging it at 99% (haven’t tried, but it
> worked on KDE).

Ask in the laptop forum.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Sorry, I don’t understand very well what that means yet… In KDE I used Dolphin as root to write on the NTFS partitions and the /root files with no problems… It’s not that I mess too much with the system files, just the necessary (editing the dhclient.conf file because I had problems with IPv6 and Yast/browsing issues, when installing apps from source…)

Yes, mr. Caf already explained the fstab file, but in the end I considered not worth enough for me, for now…

And by the way, do you know if GNOME Software Manager has an option to mark all packages from a certain repo to update if newer version is available? This option and package switch were the features I used to update software through Software Manager back in KDE.

Thanks for your help.

I don’t use gnome, but I have.
Carlos and Malcolm both live with it, so are far better placed to advise. You should listen to them.

You should make writing to ntfs work properly and not look at using root anything to do it. Or you’ll end up with permission problems.

In gnome I switch to QT yast
http://forums.opensuse.org/content/96-switch-yast-interface-qt.html

On 2012-03-01 04:16, F style wrote:
>
> robin_listas;2444693 Wrote:
>> nautilus is a dangerous program to do that, as it wants to repaint your
>> desktop.
> Sorry, I don’t understand very well what that means yet…

That you have to use the “–no-desktop” parameter.

If you want to know more, in gnome the file browser is who paints the
desktop icons and a few things more. So you get boths set of icons, root
and user…

> In KDE I
> used Dolphin as root to write on the NTFS partitions and the /root files
> with no problems… It’s not that I mess too much with the system files,
> just the necessary (editing the dhclient.conf file because I had
> problems with IPv6 and Yast/browsing issues, when installing apps from
> source…)

I have never used neither nautilus nor dolphin as root in my life, and I do
edit files as root. Dangerous tool.

> robin_listas;2444693 Wrote:
>> You can do that as user - if you change certain settings. Ask about
>> that, or search the archive, it has been asked thousands of times >:-)
> Yes, mr. Caf already explained the fstab file, but in the end I
> considered not worth enough for me, for now…

It is much easier than having to get yourself root.

> And by the way, do you know if GNOME Software Manager has an option to
> mark all packages from a certain repo to update if newer version is
> available? This option and package switch were the features I used to
> update software through Software Manager back in KDE.

The package manager is quite different in kde or gnome, and not only in
looks (it is the only known such exception in YaST). You have to choose
which you prefer - notice that you can use the other one if you prefer.

For example:


yast2 --qt online_update &
yast2 --qt sw_single &

That’s the kde version. For the gnome version, use “–gtk” instead. It is
also possible to do the switch permanent, for the entire YaST or only for
the package manager.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

So as long as I use “gnomesu nautilus --no-desktop” in console will I be fine?

On 2012-03-01 20:06, F style wrote:
>
> robin_listas;2444811 Wrote:
>> That you have to use the “–no-desktop” parameter.
> So as long as I use “gnomesu nautilus --no-desktop” in console will I
> be fine?

I think so - but as I said, I never use a graphical file browser as root,
so I would not know for real.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)