Mount a Server at Boot

I’ve been trying to do this for a week or so now.
Using Leap 42.1 - I have a server I use with my Raspberry Pis for my media. I have a FTP link to it set up in Dolphin through which I can access the server and treat it just like another hard drive, moving files, opening files etc. I want to use a better media manager for my library the Pis use and have tried to use tiny MediaManager and MediaElch, but have struck the same problem for each – my server does not show up in the ‘Add Media Source’ box in either. tMM was problematic in that I had to replace openJDK with real Java for want of a better term to actually get the side bar (left Hand side with places etc. to actually appear) managed that but now cannot actually add sources because of the above problem. Research tells me that I need to have the Server mounted at boot, so it appears as a drive that way, I’m told it will appear on the side bar.

I tried to achieve this with curlftpfs, and got there in the end even though I had a problem with the password I was using and had to backtrack to a fairly basic one. I set up a root/.netrc file and I added the below to fstab to get the ‘mount at boot’ bit working and disaster struck. Machine wouldn’t boot at all, I had to access through Knoppix, # out fstab line for curlftpfs to get it going. So that’s where I am at.

My question is: is there something wrong with the fstab entry and if so what or, alternatively, is there a better way than curlftpfs to get the server to mount at boot? Thanks

curlftpfs#server_IP_address /mnt/local_mnt fuse allow_other,uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022 0 0

If you’ve set up your Rpi as an FTP client,
Then <before> you try to make your network connection, the FTP server running on your LEAP must already be running.
Otherwise, your FTP client will fail.

If you haven’t done so,
Configure your FTP server to start up automatically on boot so you don’t have to manually start it…
You can do this in
YAST > System > Services Manager > *Your_FTP_Service
*
If you know what FTP app you have installed, you can set this easily from a root console, for example the following is for VSFtpd (one of the more popular FTP servers)

systemctl start vsftpd

Or, perhaps the easiest and best way for anyone new to setting up and managing your FTP server is to install and run the YAST applet, you can install with the following command, IIRC supports VSFTP and ProFTP (don’t know about any other FTP apps)

zypper in yast2-ftp-server

HTH,
TSU

OK, so thanks for that.

But it doesn’t actually answer any of my questions.
My FTP link to my server (which is not a PI) and my PIs works fine. I can access the server from Dolphin with a link I have set up under ‘Places’ and use it like a normal hard drive, as I said. My FTP system starts automatically at boot and I do not have to do anything, I do not even have to input credentials as I have that set up as well. So the ‘using FTP’ side is all sorted, the FTP link, that you addressed all works fine.

What I want to know is how to mount the server at boot so it appears as a hard drive under ‘Devices’ this seems to be the key to it appearing in the Media Managers (either of the ones I mentioned) so I can actually choose the server as a media source. At the moment I can’t

What file systems? How connected NFS or Samba?

Your original post was confusing as heck,
The only thing I think I might have gotten right on first read is that your RPi is a client.
You didn’t describe the fdisk entry you tried (you might post that and then people can evaluate if it should work)
There are also other ways you can mount, and you can mount using whatever protocol you wish including FTP.

Generally speaking, for a remote resource to show up automatically for selection in any app, discovery and directory services has to exist first, should make sense that nothing can be selected unless it is first discovered. SAMBA (and Windows Networking) easily provides Workgroup based Directory services. I’m assuming you’re not running other directory services like LDAP/AD. If you set up SAMBA or Windows Networking, you can then connect using whatever protocol you wish (usually smb but can be something else like FTP).

Without directory services to automatically provide something to select, as you probably did with Dolphin if you know where the network share exists, you can simply specify the correct URI and connect “blindly.”

So, if I now read your original post correctly…

  • Yes, you can configure automatic mounting of network shares on boot, even so that the remote resource is represented by a directory or disk on your system.
  • Yes, you can set up a remote resource to be a simple selection, but you have to set up the prerequisites for that to happen.

Those are two separate solutions.
For the first, you need to post your existing try creating an fdisk entry. Alternatives are to script the mounting or using a systemd Unit file to mount, there may be more methods.

For the second, as I suggested probably the most common solution is to set up SAMBA or Windows Networking correctly.

TSU

On Mon 16 May 2016 08:46:02 PM CDT, Dwarfer99 wrote:

OK, so thanks for that.

But it doesn’t actually answer any of my questions.
My FTP link to my server (which is not a PI) and my PIs works fine. I
can access the server from Dolphin with a link I have set up under
‘Places’ and use it like a normal hard drive, as I said. My FTP system
starts automatically at boot and I do not have to do anything, I do not
even have to input credentials as I have that set up as well. So the
‘using FTP’ side is all sorted, the FTP link, that you addressed all
works fine.

What I want to know is how to mount the server at boot so it appears as
a hard drive under ‘Devices’ this seems to be the key to it appearing in
the Media Managers (either of the ones I mentioned) so I can actually
choose the server as a media source. At the moment I can’t

Hi
If it’s a media server, give djmount a whirl?
http://djmount.sourceforge.net/
https://software.opensuse.org/package/djmount


Cheers Malcolm °¿° LFCS, SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
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 	 	 	   My OP wasn't confusing at all.  My RPI is not a server, so you got that wrong as well.

Why would I describe an FDISK entry when I do not want to format anything. I did however add the FSTAB entry that I tried and which didn’t work as it should have done.

I think the original entry was quite clear, and the second post clarified it even more clearly.

Why would I want to use SAMBA when all my machines are Linux based.

I asked two simple questions at the end which maybe you should have read before commenting and confusing the issue and blame others for you incomprehension

Thanks Malcolm, I had a quick look but I don’t think that is what I need. The media server works fine, I can access with my RPIs for streaming. I can access through FTP in Dolphin to ‘manage’ the files, add, delete, rename that sort of thing but for a particular more in depth media manager it appears I need the server (DLINK DNS345 for clarity) to mount at boot. That way it is in the ‘device’ list and is then accessible by the media managers - either MediaElch or tinyMediaManager. I tried to use curlftpfs, but hit a snag as per the last few lines of my original post.

To anyone who may be interested in a conclusion to this question I think I may have found an answer, but not a solution -to mount at boot anyway.
It would seem that the reason it didn’t work and why putting curlftpfs in my FSTAB killed my boot is that curlftpfs was trying to connect to a network connected server before the network came up so it couldn’t connect so that killed the boot sequence. There is a method whereby why you can set the FTAB entry at noauto so the system starts and the server connection is able to be made by mounting it manually after boot. This would have been a solution to my problem but having got them going I found that neither of the media managers I was trying suited my purpose anyway so I’ll stick to what I have before.