Missing kernel

I installed openSuse 11.4 recently, then did an update. When I rebooted, I got the following;-

Error: file not found
Error: you need to load the kernel first

Presumably, my kernel has gone AWOL.

I’d like to try to fix this problem rather than just re-install, which is what I’d normally do, so if anyone can explain how to do this, I’d be grateful.

Thanks

On 2011-10-16 15:56, johannesjones wrote:

> I’d like to try to fix this problem rather than just re-install, which
> is what I’d normally do, so if anyone can explain how to do this, I’d be
> grateful.

Boot froom the installation DVD, choose rescue system, and mount the HD
main partition on /mnt.

Then first check what is installed in the HD by using the command “rpm
–root /mnt -qa | grep -i kernel”. Then install the missing parts using the
DVD as source.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Thank you. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Hm, not going too well at the moment. I did as you suggested and I’m asked for a rescue login and password, but my user login and password don’t work. I got in using ‘root’ as a login (didn’t need a password), but ‘mnt’ doesn’t work and it doesn’t appear in the help list. Also, ‘man -k’ and ‘info’ are listed to try for commands that don’t appear in the ‘help’ list, but neither of them is recognised.

Help, please.

Yes, you were supposed to login as root without password.

fdisk -l

will help you identify which partition is your root system.

mount /dev/sda5 /mnt

will mount that partition. Change “/dev/sda5” to whatever you work out to be the correct partition (based on “fdisk” output).

Right, that helped; thanks.

I now know that the kernel that’s installed is ‘kernel-desktop-2.6.37-0.7.1.i586’.

Now I have two further problems;

  1. ‘kernel-desktop-2.6.37-0.7.1.i586’ isn’t one of the packages on the DVD. There are files which have similar numbers, but not the same.

  2. I don’t know how to install from the DVD to the HDD.

Assistance, please.

On 10/16/2011 07:46 PM, johannesjones wrote:
>
> I now know that the kernel that’s installed is
> ‘kernel-desktop-2.6.37-0.7.1.i586’.

i think that is the number of the kernel which was updated not too long
ago (which is, NOT the older number on the DVD)…so, the kernel is
good, (if it is there, as you say)

i think you just need guidance on repairing grub…and, someone else
needs to give that…

hang on for competent help!!


DD
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDlM47j0Ae8openSUSE®, the “German
Automobiles” of operating systems

As soon as I read the above, I realised what I was doing wrong; so I dug out my trusty notebook of useful terminal commands and did the following;
(in Ubuntu, which is the distro whose Grub is being used) sudo update-grub, then sudo grub-install /dev/sda.

OpenSuse is now up and running. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

Thanks to all who responded and apologies for being so dense. :shame:

On 2011-10-16 19:56, DenverD wrote:
> On 10/16/2011 07:46 PM, johannesjones wrote:
>>
>> I now know that the kernel that’s installed is
>> ‘kernel-desktop-2.6.37-0.7.1.i586’.

You could run a rpm verify on it.

> i think you just need guidance on repairing grub…and, someone else needs
> to give that…

If it is that, you need to edit the “/mnt/boot/grub/menu.lst” file to
contain a correct entry for the kernel. You might find the old file in
“/mnt/boot/grub/menu.lst.old”.

As an editor in the rescue system you have joe and vi.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

The commands I listed in my last post did the trick for me. I only found ‘grub-install /dev/sdx’ recently, and along with ‘update-grub’ it’s the easiest way I’ve found to deal with the problem of a newly installed distro not including all the other distros present on the system in it’s start-up menu. Any Microsoft OS and OpenSuse, for example. All you need to be able to do is boot into one of the Os’s present to carry out these commands. Easy with Supergrub 2.

Thanks again for the help.

On 2011-10-16 22:16, johannesjones wrote:
> ll you need to be able to do is boot into one of the Os’s
> present to carry out these commands. Easy with Supergrub 2.

You kept dark all that info about having grub 2 and multiboot.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

My apologies. I didn’t realise it was relevant initially. I’ve got several Os’s installed; Windows 7 and various flavours of Ubuntu. I also like OpenSUSE, but until now, not knowing how to deal with the fact that it didn’t search out other OS’s on the system and include them in Grub has put me off. Hopefully, that’s now sorted.

Thanks again.

John

To fix this run sudo update-grub. If you have more than one OS installed make sure to do it on te LAST OS you installed.:wink:

Thanks for that. Unfortunately, this problem has been rather overtaken by events; for some reason, I’m having a lot of problems with all the flavours of Linux that I’ve tried. I bought a new PC and these problems started then, so presumably it’s something about the hardware. So, as I’ve got no idea what to do about these problems, for the time being, I’m stuck with Windows 7.

Thanks again.

John

On Thu, 10 Nov 2011 09:36:02 GMT, johannesjones
<johannesjones@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

>
>jaws222;2402294 Wrote:
>> To fix this run sudo update-grub. If you have more than one OS
>> installed make sure to do it on te LAST OS you installed.:wink:
>Thanks for that. Unfortunately, this problem has been rather overtaken
>by events; for some reason, I’m having a lot of problems with all the
>flavours of Linux that I’ve tried. I bought a new PC and these problems
>started then, so presumably it’s something about the hardware. So, as
>I’ve got no idea what to do about these problems, for the time being,
>I’m stuck with Windows 7.
>
>Thanks again.
>
>John

Maybe not a complete loss. I have run openSuse 11.3 inside a VirtualBox
VM on top of Win7. Of course the box has a 6 core processor and 16 GiB
RAM.

?-)

I considered that option, but it would mean that I’d still be using Windows; my main reason for moving to Linux was that I dislike some of Microsoft’s ways of doing business; for instance, having to activate Windows every time I mess up my hard drive (usually by messing around with Linux) until I’m told I’ve done too many activations and I’ll have to buy a new license. Why? I’ve paid for this genuine XP (as it was at the time), why should I have to pay for it again? I realise that Microsoft is worried about unauthorised copying, and all that, but I don’t see why I should be penalised when I’ve done nothing wrong. End of rant. >:(

There is also the security consideration; I’m much less likely to have problems with malware while using Linux. I still do all my internet purchasing using Linux, unstable as it is at present (for me, not generally).

Also, I like the look and feel of OpenSuse, Ubuntu, Mint, etc.

Okay, I’ve just talked myself into trying OpenSuse as a guest OS.

Thanks for the suggestion.

So tell us of you new hardware. Someone may know what to do about it.