Microsoft and SUSE Renew Successful Interoperability Agreement

I am a new Linux and openSUSE user so I was not aware of an agreement between Novell and Microsoft which occurred in November of 2006. I found someones blog that discusses it but no followup was ever done over the years:

Blogger: Andreas’ Blog - Post a Comment

Now I see that the agreement was just renewed:

Microsoft and SUSE Renew Successful Interoperability Agreement | SUSE

Are there any current openSUSE users that used openSUSE before this agreement? I’m curious how this agreement has impacted the openSUSE community. Any thoughts?

I was already using SuSE back then. That may have been before the “opensuse” version was separated out.

There was some handwringing in the opensource community. But I have not seen any problems that resulted from the agreement.

On 07/26/2011 05:36 AM, Keith EE wrote:
>
> Are there any current openSUSE users that used openSUSE before this
> agreement?

sure, lots of them…
i started with SuSE before there was an openSUSE…

> I’m curious how this agreement has impacted the openSUSE
> community. Any thoughts?

first you must understand that openSUSE is an free and open software
community…while SUSE Linux Enterprise Server/Desktop (and others) are
commercial products of a company (not community) named SUSE, which was
owned and operated by Novell (a publicly traded corporation) until
recently, when Novell was purchased by Attachmate…

personally i felt little to no impact from the MS-Novell deal, and i
expect little from the SUSE-MS deal…other than, i hope we get some
more trickle down in the form of infrastructure support and corporate
sponsorship…

and of course the $1M i guess benefits the entire FOSS community because
(like Red Hat and others) we have some really fine software engineers on
the SUSE payroll who help make openSUSE in particular (and Linux in
general) ZOOM!!

as far as i can see MS plays no role in anything the openSUSE
community does…

ymmv


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Engineered Automobiles” of operating systems!

I’ve been with openSUSE (and before then SuSE) since 2001.

BEFORE Novell acquired SuSE-GmbH, there was always a ‘financial issue’ hovering over SuSE-GmbH’s capability to continue funding SuSE (as it was more or less called at the time). I think both IBM and Novell donated money to SuSE-GmbH to help keep it alive.

When Novell took over SuSE-GmbH, the financial aspects of SuSE and then shortly after openSUSE, took a SIGNIFICANT turn for the better. However IMHO the technical side suffered a bit. A bad decision was made wrt package management in openSUSE-10.1 (using the less than polished (for openSUSE) package management of another Novell division) which resulted in droves of users leaving openSUSE for other distributions. In addition it was around the openSUSE-10.0 / 10.1 timeframe when SuSE-GmbH (then owned by Novell) was pushing the policy of not including all non-open source packages, including not including high performance non-open source drivers. This resulted in decreased performance for users who struggle with the new method for re-installing those now removed proprietary drivers (and multimedia codecs) and that meant a lot of users left openSUSE as well for those reasons.

In comparison, the Novell-Microsoft deal had little obvious impact on openSUSE users. Rather it caused an up roar in the GNU/Linux community, and GNU/Linux who were Microsoft haters, who also could not understand the agreement , either started bad mouthing openSUSE or simply left openSUSE out of hate for Microsoft. On the other side of the coin, the upside was from a financial perspective, as the money helped solidify SLED/SLES and openSUSE’s place in the future financially.

So IMHO there is no clear answer … other than to say (1) no technical impact of the Microsoft - Novell deal, (2) a significant improvement in financial stability, and (3) a significant amount of bad mouthing and fud produced outside the openSUSE community.

On Tue, 26 Jul 2011 16:16:02 +0000, oldcpu wrote:

> A bad decision was made wrt
> package management in openSUSE-10.1 (using the less than polished (for
> openSUSE) package management of another Novell division) which resulted
> in droves of users leaving openSUSE for other distributions.

I certainly agree that package management was an issue here, but the
decision wasn’t about a less polished package manager (Red Carpet, from
Ximian), but that the very polished package manager was completely
scrapped and rewritten in Mono, which itself wasn’t in any way, shape, or
form ready for prime time.

I think one of the cardinal rules of introducing something like Mono is
don’t use it for anything that is critical to the system.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

I don’t have the expertise to comment on the specifics of package management. But as an end-user I felt very frustrated with opensuse-10.2; opensuse-10.3 was an improvement and opensuse-11.3 & opensuse-11.4 are really superb.