Looking for software to create hard disks image files from existing hard drives.

Looking for software to create hard disks image files from existing hard drives. I have a few old hard drives I would like to create images of. That could be either restored to another hard drive or used in a virtual machine.

krj373 wrote:

>
> Looking for software to create hard disks image files from existing hard
> drives. I have a few old hard drives I would like to create images of.
> That could be either restored to another hard drive or used in a virtual
> machine.
>
>

Do you want exact copies of the drives? If so you should look into dd (be
careful with it if you choose to use it). Otherwise I think people use tools
like rsync to manage backups. As for using in a VM I dont know if dd can
output in a format that can directly be read by VirtualBox/KVM but you can
share the file dd spits out with the VM and then restore it manually from
within the VM.

I use Clonezilla.

Andy

On 2014-05-31 04:06, krj373 wrote:
>
> Looking for software to create hard disks image files from existing hard
> drives. I have a few old hard drives I would like to create images of.
> That could be either restored to another hard drive or used in a virtual
> machine.

In Linux a plain ‘dd’ o even more, ‘cp’, suffices to create such an
image. You do not need any special software.

Look:


Telcontar:~/tmp/image # cp /dev/sr0 cdrom.iso
Telcontar:~/tmp/image # file -s /dev/sr0
/dev/sr0: # ISO 9660 CD-ROM filesystem data 'SU5301.W02'
Telcontar:~/tmp/image # file cdrom.iso
cdrom.iso: # ISO 9660 CD-ROM filesystem data 'SU5301.W02'
Telcontar:~/tmp/image #

I can mount that image file I just created and see the files in it:


Telcontar:~/tmp/image # md mountpoint
Telcontar:~/tmp/image # mount -o loop cdrom.iso mountpoint/
mount: /dev/loop0 is write-protected, mounting read-only
Telcontar:~/tmp/image # ls mountpoint/
..S.u.S.E-disk-002.1998090808  INDEX.gz  TRANS.TBL  full-names  ls-lR.gz
suse
Telcontar:~/tmp/image #
Telcontar:~/tmp/image # mount | grep cdrom
/root/tmp/image/cdrom.iso on /root/tmp/image/mountpoint type iso9660
(ro,relatime)
Telcontar:~/tmp/image #

See?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

Clonezilla…Clonezilla!!! :slight_smile:

http://clonezilla.org/

You can either make a copy on device level or on file level.

The first means that all disk blocks are copied and that you thus have a a copy of the partitiontable, and all partitions with their file systems (of maybe different types) copied (to anothet devicee or to a file). No interpretation whatsoever on what those disk blocks contain is made. dd is the command and I guess that Clonezilla is something like it with a GUI interface. You should do this with all on disk unused (filesystems unmounted).

The second copies files and thus when you have more partitions, you some how have to cope with that (either make separate copies per file system, or make a copy of all with the file systems mounted in a logical tree. You probably want at least the directory trees of the different file systems saved. One of the tools is of course tar, which is able to archive a directory tree, including ownership and permissions of all files, into one file, that can be compressed on the fly.

I want a true clone of the drive.

Then the answer to that is already given above. I assume.

On 2014-06-01 21:16, hcvv wrote:
>
> krj373;2646759 Wrote:
>> I want a true clone of the drive.
> Then the answer to that is already given above. I assume.

Yes, it has.

Notice that clonezilla images are not true clones, by the way. They can
be compressed, and they skip empty blocks of known filesystem types. Of
course, a clonezilla image can be used to recreate a disk on another
disk, but the image as is can not be used, for instance, with a virtual
machine.

And for things like forensics, a clonezilla image is not valid, because
it does not copy empty blocks. Things can be hidden in there.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

Well, actually, that depends on the settings you choose when making the image. Yes, Clonezilla can make exact clones, but you have to make that choice in the menus.

Quote from Clonezilla info:

… sector-to-sector copy is done by dd in Clonezilla.

Clonezilla uses:
PartImage, Partclone, ntfsclone, and dd

You can choose among multiple compress utilities included, or you can choose uncompressed images. Or, you can clone from disk to disk.

I mostly use if from a bootable USB key.

On 2014-06-02 02:06, Fraser Bell wrote:

> Well, actually, that depends on the settings you choose when making the
> image. Yes, Clonezilla can make exact clones, but you have to make that
> choice in the menus.

I know.

But this was not explained in the previous posts :slight_smile:

And using clonezilla to tell it to use dd… then I think it is better
just use dd directly - unless you are cloning over the network or something.

Another problem, for me, if that if I want to backup a drive with
clonezilla, I have to reboot with clonezilla disk and stop all my work,
maybe for hours, even if the disks affected are not those used by the
openSUSE system.

That is, I can not install a clonezilla application in openSUSE.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)

Although there are many image-based backup utilities available,
I also endorse Clonezilla for small scenarios.
For a business environment, I instead recommend g4u because it implements at least the following in addition to imaging…

  • Integrated management of source and targets across the network
  • Multiple transport capabilities, ie CIFS/SAMBA, FTP, HTTP, more
  • Supports cloning any OS easily
  • Quick and easy recovery from images no matter where the images are stored on the network.

As for use in a virtual machine, although images can often be mounted as raw file systems (eg on a loop device), I instead highly recommend running them through a P2V utility to convert to a virtual disk format. You should get better performance, sometimes a different I/O (eg QCOW), features, possible compressions, split disks, etc.

TSU