limiting the internet speed

How to limit the internet traffic of each applications? Like FireFox download rate and upload rate, like the whole OpenSUSE traffic and so on.

Internet traffic is only the traffic that leaves your LAN. In other words that goes through your router. IMHO thht would be the place to throtle things.

When you limit Fx (if that is possible), I guess will not only limit Internet traffic, but all traffic.

Linux supports a multitide of possibilities.

Google something like “linux shaping”

I don’t know any free GUI tools but there are plenty of proprietary solutions. The basic functionality is usually free, though.

Typically can throttle/prioritize by a number of parameters, eg
Soft/hard
Fixed/relative
Protocol
Port
Application
Tagged
Source host

HTH,
TSU

On Sat, 11 May 2013 11:56:04 +0000, aususe wrote:

> How to limit the internet traffic of each applications? Like FireFox
> download rate and upload rate, like the whole OpenSUSE traffic and so
> on.

Limiting download rates in particular tends to be tricky - as hccv said,
the proper place to do this is at the router. This is because at the
router, you can limit the download as an “upload” (from the router to
your machine), which is something you can control. Download speeds are
typically throttled by network congestion. It can be emulated (and some
apps do this - IIRC this is how Bittorrent lets you set download/upload
rates), but it’s not an exact thing. TCP/IP basically works by sending
data as fast as it can and looking for acknowledgements; if acks are
missing, the sender adjusts the sending speed until the ack drop rate is
acceptable.

Doing it per application is trickier still, because multiple applications
use the same protocols - usually when you put limits on traffic, you
limit by protocol rather than by application.

You can look at Wondershaper (looks like it’s in the standard repos) as
one way of limiting bandwidth. Other methods include applying QoS, but
that also tends to be fairly involved.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

Windows OS has many of this kinds of this tools to control the speed of internet traffic, is there a easy way for OpenSUSE to do it?

It’s definitely not the OS that does this, but third party programs. F.e. ktorrent, kwooty etc. have this, like their windu equivalents.

Although I haven’t visited this in awhile,
You should be able to shape your traffic at any place, a critical node (eg router) or even endpoint.

Here is some really complex information that still might be enough to convince you this is possible even in your openSUSE
Linux Advanced Routing & Traffic Control HOWTO
Queueing Disciplines for Bandwidth Management
Advice for when to use which queue

After reading the above, you might come to the quick conclusion that a GUI manager would be really nice instead of trying to understand the highly technical functions described in these links. I haven’t looked at anything recently and my main experience has been configuring network devices but this looks promising
MasterShaper - MasterShaper

Note that although technically you can only directly control outgoing traffic, because TCP/IP is a 2-way protocol, there are ways to influence the other end to slow packets sent to you.

Note that all these links mainly reference kernel 2.6.x (and should work for later kernels). Newer technologies exist now that offloads processing to the NICs, if you have one of these I assume they should support QoS settings which might do what you want. I haven’t investigated Linux driver support but assume exists, I’ve personally only configured on Windows.

HTH,
TSU

You might find this interesting as well if it works (I haven’t tested, but the script looks like it’s understandable)

Traffic Shaping, Bandwidth Shaping, Packet Shaping with Linux tc htb

Good Luck,
TSU

On Sun, 19 May 2013 12:06:02 +0000, aususe wrote:

> Windows OS has many of this kinds of this tools to control the speed of
> internet traffic, is there a easy way for OpenSUSE to do it?

As I said, take a look at Wondershaper. It’s in the software service at
http://software.opensuse.org.

But also as I said, from a technical standpoint, it’s not a precise thing
and it’s not a terribly easy thing to implement because of how TCP/IP
works.

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C