Kernel 2.6.36 Has Been Released - Nvidia Driver 260.19 Has Been Released

So if you are an ardent fan of installing the very latest kernel, you can now find that kernel 2.6.36 has been released. I have installed it using the sakc script and it seems to be working just fine. If you are a nVidia card user, you will want to also upgrade to the most recent video driver as well as the old one did not seem to work with the new kernel. Here is some information on Kernel 2.6.36.

The Linux Kernel Archives

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 1) - Graphics - The H Open Source: News and Features

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 2) - File systems, networking and storage - The H Open Source: News and Features

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 3) - Architecture & Infrastructure - The H Open Source: News and Features

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 4) - Drivers - The H Open Source: News and Features

For anyone wishing to install kernel 2.6.36, you will be doing so at your own risk. Here is a link to my script that can be used to load it:

S.A.K.C - SuSE Automated Kernel Compiler

After finishing the compile, you may want to check to make sure the option “nomodeset” is still present and add it in if it is missing and you used it before. To compile the kernel, make sure you have the three packages base, kernel and C/C++ installed.

As stated before, if you install the newest kernel and use the nVidia driver, you are going to need to download the latest version from:

Drivers - Download NVIDIA Drivers

SDB:Configuring graphics cards - openSUSE

And reinstall it the hard way one more time.

Thank You,

Seem good, but I will wait it on software.opensuse!

alexdbars Seem good, but I will wait it on software.opensuse!
One thing is for sure, if you have a properly working system, then don’t fix what is not broken. Some of us just live on the edge and want to try what is new and sometimes we pay for by reinstalling openSUSE again. For what it is worth, the word is openSUSE 11.4 will be based on kernel 2.6.37 and should be ready next year for its release.

Thank You,

oldcpu just posted a massive listing of the fixes in the new nVidia driver 260.19 at the following thread you should check it out:

NVIDIA 260.19 Issues

Thank You,

For anyone wishing to install kernel 2.6.36, you will be doing so at your own risk. Here is a link to my script that can be used to load it:

S.A.K.C - SuSE Automated Kernel Compiler

After finishing the compile, you may want to check to make sure the option “nomodeset” is still present and add it in if it is missing and you used it before. To compile the kernel, make sure you have the three packages base, kernel and C/C++ installed.

I have a fresh 11.3 install on a laptop suffering from the INTEL GMA HD problem(s). From the links provided, it appears that this new kernel may include the support fro the Intel GMA HD graphics. From the SAKC documentation, it appears that prior kernels are retained. As such, the downside of installation of the new kernel would be a re-install.

Does the SAKC process or the new kernel install impact GRUB (other than adding the new kernel entry) ? Also, as I currently MUST boot 11.3 with “nomodeset” (due to the Intel GMA HD), I would then REMOVE the “nomodeset” to test the new support. Is there any other reason to retain the “nomodeset” ?

(Apologies for rambling … the prospects of the Intel GMA HD support in the new kernel has led to some giddiness … :wink: )

I have a fresh 11.3 install on a laptop suffering from the INTEL GMA HD problem(s). From the links provided, it appears that this new kernel may include the support fro the Intel GMA HD graphics. From the SAKC documentation, it appears that prior kernels are retained. As such, the downside of installation of the new kernel would be a re-install.

Does the SAKC process or the new kernel install impact GRUB (other than adding the new kernel entry) ? Also, as I currently MUST boot 11.3 with “nomodeset” (due to the Intel GMA HD), I would then REMOVE the “nomodeset” to test the new support. Is there any other reason to retain the “nomodeset” ?
Before you undertake a kernel update, back up all important data and consider the worst could happen when you least expect it. These are words to live by.

That being said, the sakc script is suppose to create a new entry in your grub menu.lst file for the compiled kernel, and preserve all other entries and kernels you have installed. If you use a propitiatory video driver from nVidia or ATI/AMD, consider that you will need to reinstall it and in the case of nVidia, that needs to be version 260.19, the most recent that has been released. The nomodeset command may or may not be re-added for you. I normally do an edit of the menu.lst file and make sure nomodeset is present and even check your default video mode to see if it is correct. Make any required changes before you reboot your computer. We have seen that problems with the new nVidia driver and the KDE 4.5 desktop may exist. So be for warned if you use the KDE 4.5 desktop and the nVidia driver.

When you compile the kernel, you get many error messages about this or that problem. This seems normal. The overall process can take up to one hour. That is also normal. It is best to disable any screen savers from running while the compile goes forth. When you run through the configuration process, you will be asked about all new functions being added for which you have no configuration data, I normally press enter for the default for all (new) items. Your choices are M=module to make a module to be loaded when needed, n=no & don’t use or include, y=yes & to make a compile/include module in kernel. Enter ? for help on each item, the default will be shown in a capital letter. I normally take the default.

Thank You,

Nope.

If you can still get in runlevel 3, you can use Yast to return to the distro’s kernel. If you don’t…

Boot from a liveCD, take over installed system*, install distro’s or distro’s updated kernel, reinstall video driver, done.

*) search for “chroot /mnt” and you’ll find instructions.

Latest kernel, if you want to take the risk, or do a test ride, is in the

Is “Nope” in the context of “That turns out not to be the case.” ? My previous post

From the links provided, it appears that this new kernel may include the support fro the Intel GMA HD graphics. From the SAKC documentation, it appears that prior kernels are retained. As such, the downside of installation of the new kernel would be a re-install.

is the “support for the Intel GMA HD” not in the 2.6.36 kernel ? (If so, I will not pursue the kernel now).

Are prior kernels in fact not retained by the SAKC ? (If not, then

will apply.

Lastly, as to “the downside of installation of the new kernel would be a reinstall”, I was enquiring as to a kernel install corrupting the partition structure or the Windows 7 and Ubuntu 10.04.1 LTS installs.

For now, I am studying the options. I can and will wait to test this new kernel. If there is no danger to my other two (2) installs, I will attempt the new kernel straightaway, as the possibility of a full 11.3 reinstall is not a problem. I have done it several times already (DVD, liveCD, network, liveCD (again), 11.4 MS2 (DVD and liveCD), 11.3 liveCD and DVD).

So Intel does not seem to list the information in a way I could determine where kernel support started but it looks like it was in kernel 2.6.35 and so should continue through the newest 2.6.36. They have prerequisites that include the latest Xorg and so forth, though I would be careful switching to that version of Xorg and would try my present one first. The bottom line is you have a very good chance of installing the latest kernel and giving it a try without losing or removing anything else. We do not live in a world of total guaranties and installations can have unintended consequences. The chances you take depend on the value of the reward and I can’t answer that question for you.

Thank You,

I installed 2.6.36-rc8-33-desktop x86_64 using 1-click from OBS (Kernel:/HEAD/openSUSE-11.3), to see if it improved support for my notebook (Lenovo SL510) and “intel” driver problems. It has now gone up to -rc8.34.1, so will update it further. Kernel works very well together with KDE 4.5.2, but “intel” driver problem with Flash full-screen is still present. The alsamixer and KMix channels are better configured, and sound is very good. Notebook’s special function keys still don’t work. Suspend to ram still doesn’t work, but hibernate still works. Haven’t found any other problems, so far. Grub was correctly updated after 1-click and reboot worked without a hitch.

Nomodeset prevents the use of Kernel Mode Setting, so display mode setting has to be done by X system using your graphics driver. It prevents the loading of the “intel” driver which only supports KMS, and that leads to “fbdev” driver being loaded, or any other driver configured in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d (or xorg.conf). You can always configure for an alternative driver. You should only need nomodeset if the display modesetting fails, and/or you want the default alternative driver which in the case of “intel”, is “fbdev”.