Issues with Static IP Network Configuration

First, let me preface this with saying I am painfully new to both programming and Linux so please excuse my mistakes. I am attempting to configure the internet on a RDT CMX158886 PC-104 cpuModule running openSuse 11.4. I went to YaST > Network Devices > Network Settings and tried to configure the Network card. It found 82801DB PRO/100 VM (MOB) Ethernet Controller. I selected Edit to configure, changed the IP address, and the Subnet Mask and hit Next. It ran the rest of the Network Configuration process, but the computer does not seem to have any internet connection. I typed:

  • /usr/sbin/hwinfo --netcard
  • /sbin/ifconfig

into the terminal and got a bunch of output, but I really don’t know what I should be looking for. I also went into the Global options tab and made sure it was set to Traditional with ifup. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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You didn’t mention configuration of a default gateway (router) or DNS
servers. Without those you probably won’t get far, so go set those as
well. Useful commands to see your current configuration include the
following; paste the output to http://paste.opensuse.org/ and then post
back the resulting link you are given to this thread if needed still:

ip addr
ip route
ip -s link
grep -v ‘^#’ /etc/resolv.conf

Good luck.
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Ab, thank you for your quick reply. I am unable to paste the output of those commands since I do not have internet access on the computer that I’m trying to configure the network for. I do not have control of the default gateway or DNS server since I am at a work facility. I was under the impression that given the static IP address and subnet mask assigned to my port, I would be able to configure this computer just like I did with the current desktop I’m on (albeit this is a windows machine).

When you do not configure a default gateway the system does not know where the Internet is and thus can only access systems on it’s LAN.

When you do not configure DNS server(s), your system can not resolve host/domain names and you can only go on the Internet using IP addressses.

Your Windows system most probbly gets its default gateway together with it’s DNS servers and together with it;s IP address from the DHCP server (most probably the same as the router)… But you choose for some reason not to use the DHCP server, but to configure yourself. And that means that you have to configure all: IP address, defaulot router and DNS server(s).

You do not have to have “control of the defaulot gateway”, you only must know what it’s IP address is, to enter that in the configuration.
Same for DNS server(s). You must not control them, you must enter their IP addresses.

A warning. When there is a DHCP server runing on your LAN, you can not simply use any IP address you like. You can only use one that is in a range not managed by the DHCP server. And as you say you “do not have control of the default gateway”, I guess you are not the network manager of that LAN. In that case you must of course ask that person which IP address you can use. And (s)he will also inform you what the default gataway is and what the DNS server(s). That person will not be verry happy when you just starrt using an IP address in his/her LAN. Oh no :frowning:

Working on speaking to the Network Admin. I went back in and specified the Default Gateway, but I am unable to determine the address for the DNS server. I will have to wait until tomorrow to determine that. Thanks again.

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> I was under the impression that given the static IP address and
> subnet mask assigned to my port, I would be able to configure this
> computer just like I did with the current desktop I’m on (albeit this
> is a windows machine).

Yes, exactly, but you must tell the computer, regardless of the OS, how
it accesses the internet (gateway) and how it resolves DNS addresses to
IPs (DNS Servers). Until you do this any computer will fail to get off
of its local network (because it cannot find the gateway to the world)
or resolve anything via DNS (because it does not know to whom to send
name resolution requests. You would have needed to specify the same
things in windows… check a nearby (on the same network) machine, of
any OS, for this information. The data will all be IP addresses, at
least one for each section. Often you can cheat on the DNS stuff and
point to something like 8.8.8.8 or 4.4.4.4 or 208.67.222.222 (public,
free options) but the gateway is an address that you must put in for
your network. Usually it is on the end of the local network’s IP
address range, so if you’re on the 192.168.1.x network it would usually
be 192.168.1.254 or 192.168.1.1 (assuming a traditional “class C” network).

Good luck.
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I was able to find the addresses of the two DNS Servers, but I cannot figure out where to enter them. I went to Network Settings > Hostname/DNS but I am unclear where they belong.

EDIT: Nevermind that was a silly question. I just put the addresses under Names 1 and 2 and now it works. Thanks for the help guys!

On 07/12/2012 03:05 PM, ab wrote:
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>
>> I was under the impression that given the static IP address and
>> subnet mask assigned to my port, I would be able to configure this
>> computer just like I did with the current desktop I’m on (albeit this
>> is a windows machine).
>
> Yes, exactly, but you must tell the computer, regardless of the OS, how
> it accesses the internet (gateway) and how it resolves DNS addresses to
> IPs (DNS Servers). Until you do this any computer will fail to get off
> of its local network (because it cannot find the gateway to the world)
> or resolve anything via DNS (because it does not know to whom to send
> name resolution requests. You would have needed to specify the same
> things in windows… check a nearby (on the same network) machine, of
> any OS, for this information. The data will all be IP addresses, at
> least one for each section. Often you can cheat on the DNS stuff and
> point to something like 8.8.8.8 or 4.4.4.4 or 208.67.222.222 (public,
> free options) but the gateway is an address that you must put in for
> your network. Usually it is on the end of the local network’s IP
> address range, so if you’re on the 192.168.1.x network it would usually
> be 192.168.1.254 or 192.168.1.1 (assuming a traditional “class C” network).

One small point. That should be 8.8.4.4, not 4.4.4.4.

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There should be a ‘Hostname’ tab or button or some section. In OpenSUSE
12.1 it’s the section labeled ‘Hostname/DNS’. In there should be three
fields where you can specify DNS servers. Put the addresses in there.

Larry Finger is right… 8.8.4.4, not 4.4.4.4 as I mis-typed for one of
the IPs earlier.

Good luck.
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On 07/13/2012 06:06 AM, kwestcobb wrote:
>
> Working on speaking to the Network Admin. I went back in and specified
> the Default Gateway, but I am unable to determine the address for the
> DNS server. I will have to wait until tomorrow to determine that. Thanks
> again.
>
>

Adequate addresses for the DNS servers are as specified by ab (with
correction by Larry Finger) namely 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4


Regards
swerdna

Or you could go with 4.2.2.2. It is also a free DNS server to use.

On 07/12/2012 08:26 PM, glistwan wrote:
>
> swerdna;2474020 Wrote:
>> On 07/13/2012 06:06 AM, kwestcobb wrote:
>>>
>>> Working on speaking to the Network Admin. I went back in and
>> specified
>>> the Default Gateway, but I am unable to determine the address for the
>>> DNS server. I will have to wait until tomorrow to determine that.
>> Thanks
>>> again.
>>>
>>>
>>
>> Adequate addresses for the DNS servers are as specified by ab (with
>> correction by Larry Finger) namely 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4
>>
>> –
>> Regards
>> swerdna
> Or you could go with 4.2.2.2. It is also a free DNS server to use.

To set the nameservers, you can edit /etc/resolv.conf and put the nameserver IP
addresses in the order you wish to use them. The one I use for my fixed IP system is


nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.4.4
nameserver 192.168.1.1

The last one goes thru my router to the DNS servers of my ISP. I could eliminate
that one, and you should until you can verify your local server.

Larry Finger wrote:
> To set the nameservers, you can edit /etc/resolv.conf and put the
> nameserver IP addresses in the order you wish to use them. The one I use
> for my fixed IP system is
>
>


> nameserver 8.8.8.8
> nameserver 8.8.4.4
> nameserver 192.168.1.1
> 

>
> The last one goes thru my router to the DNS servers of my ISP. I could
> eliminate that one, and you should until you can verify your local server.

Actually, it may be the case that using external DNS servers is not a
good idea. The OP is on a corporate network and local machines may well
use a local domain name. In which case, in order to access any local
machine by name, he will have to use the corporate DNS servers.

So get the correct addresses from your local network admin and/or by
inspecting your Windows machine.

If you don’t mind me asking, why are you using static addresses on a
corporate network? It’s usually much simpler and safer to accept
whatever information is served out by the DHCP server. Not just basics
like DNS but maybe NTP, NIS etc etc.

On 2012-07-13 11:23, Dave Howorth wrote:

> If you don’t mind me asking, why are you using static addresses on a
> corporate network? It’s usually much simpler and safer to accept
> whatever information is served out by the DHCP server. Not just basics
> like DNS but maybe NTP, NIS etc etc.

Absolutely.

The only reason would be that the machine is going to be a server, but this
can also be handled via dhcp (it can serve a fixed IP to certain machines).


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

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Along those lines if you want to find out the proper gateway/DNS/etc.
settings without going to a network admin, and if you are on the
network, and if you have ‘root’ access to your system, you can pretend
to use DHCP and see all of the settings very easily. Open a terminal
and run the following command (assuming your NIC is ‘eth0’ on your system):

sudo /usr/sbin/dhcpcd-test wlan0

Look for the GATEWAYS and DNSSERVERS lines. This does not actually
accept an IP address, but it will show you what the DHCP server dishes
out by default.

Good luck.
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