Is email obsolete?

Hi,

My ISP (Telefónica in Spain) surprised me recently, because I found out
that although they would maintain exiting email accounts, they will no
longer provide email accounts to new clients, or more accounts to old
clients.

I do not understand this move.

Perhaps they consider it cheaper not to do it themselves and have people
use gmail or hotmail or whatever. Or perhaps email is obsolete and not
in fashion, people use other things like whatsapp instead.

Dunno. :-??

Is something similar happening on other countries?

(they are also removing existing client webpages)


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

What I notice over here in the U.S. is that ISP’s are using other email providers. CenturyLink may use hotmail (now outlook), AT&T may use Yahoo!, others may use Gmail. A few ISP’s still do use their own email service, but they do seem to be dwindling.

On Thu 23 May 2013 02:26:01 AM CDT, Jonathan R wrote:

What I notice over here in the U.S. is that ISP’s are using other email
providers. CenturyLink may use hotmail (now outlook), AT&T may use
Yahoo!, others may use Gmail. A few ISP’s still do use their own email
service, but they do seem to be dwindling.

Hi
Yup, my ISP CableOne use gmail…


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
openSUSE 12.3 (x86_64) Kernel 3.7.10-1.4-desktop
up 23:09, 4 users, load average: 0.20, 0.12, 0.07
CPU AMD Athlon™ II P360@2.30GHz | GPU Mobility Radeon HD 4200

On 2013-05-23, Carlos E. R. <robin_listas@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:
> Is something similar happening on other countries?

ISPs in the U.K. used to provide an email address to every customer (whether or not you wanted it). Now it is only
optional. I suspect the use of an ISP-based email address is dwindling as the customers would like to exercise the
consumer right to switch from one ISP to another without having to change their email address.

On 2013-05-23 09:46, flymail wrote:
> On 2013-05-23, Carlos E. R. <robin_listas@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:
>> Is something similar happening on other countries?
>
> ISPs in the U.K. used to provide an email address to every customer (whether or not you wanted it). Now it is only
> optional. I suspect the use of an ISP-based email address is dwindling as the customers would like to exercise the
> consumer right to switch from one ISP to another without having to change their email address.

Well, yes, that’s indeed a concern, it is one of the main reasons why I
don’t consider switching to a cable provider instead, getting TV and
higher speed.

There is an alternative adsl/phone provider here that phones everybody
trying to convince people to switch over to them (specially if they are
old age as they are an easy target). When I feel like talking to
somebody, one of my arguments is that although they “port” or migrate
your phone number to the new company, they don’t port mail addresses. I
tell them to call back when they do it. Kind of funny to see their
reaction :slight_smile:

The problem is that I don’t know of alternative email providers that I
really like and trust. I accept google, but they do things like deleting
duplicate emails automatically that I hate. If you are subscribed to a
mail list, and you are sent both a private copy and a list copy, you
only get the private copy because it arrives first. The other one is
deleted.

The usual concern with gmail is that they scan email to customize publicity.

On the other hand, my ISP email account are not secure, they transmit as
plain text and mail can be sniffed, particularly if I use my laptop on
an open wifi spot. It is probably safe when I connect from home.

And of course, going over to another email provider is indeed a problem.
Mail list subscription can be changed, but contacting everybody to give
the new address… may be impossible if you gave your email on a paper
card to somebody 5 years ago, and then suddenly they want to write. Or
if I simply do not remember everybody, or every subscription, or every
product or hardware registration over the years…


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

On 2013-05-23 04:31, malcolmlewis wrote:
>

> On Thu 23 May 2013 02:26:01 AM CDT, Jonathan R wrote:
>
>
> What I notice over here in the U.S. is that ISP’s are using other email
> providers. CenturyLink may use hotmail (now outlook), AT&T may use
> Yahoo!, others may use Gmail. A few ISP’s still do use their own email
> service, but they do seem to be dwindling.
>
>
>
>

> Hi
> Yup, my ISP CableOne use gmail…

So, it is indeed a global thing.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

On 2013-05-23, Carlos E. R. <robin_listas@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:
> The usual concern with gmail is that they scan email to customize publicity.

I suppose the problem with any free email provider is that they will want something back for the service. Presumably
paid-for email accounts (e.g. Mail.org) are a little more secure and less intrusive.

In a brief visit to Republica Hypothetica, consider a dream world where Novell sponsored the provision of free email
addresses for the openSUSE community (e.g. upon installation). Of course this isn’t going to happen, but I’m reserving
flymail@opensuse.org for the record :)!

On 2013-05-23 12:49, flymail wrote:
> On 2013-05-23, Carlos E. R. <robin_listas@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:
>> The usual concern with gmail is that they scan email to customize publicity.
>
> I suppose the problem with any free email provider is that they will want something back for the service. Presumably
> paid-for email accounts (e.g. Mail.org) are a little more secure and less intrusive.

I only have experience with a paid account in Spain, and I don’t like it
much, either… pop3 only, for instance.

> In a brief visit to Republica Hypothetica, consider a dream world where Novell sponsored the provision of free email
> addresses for the openSUSE community (e.g. upon installation). Of course this isn’t going to happen, but I’m reserving
> flymail@opensuse.org for the record :)!

Not going to happen :-p

There are @opensuse.org addresses, I have one. But it is a mail
redirector, not an actual address. And redirectors may have problems
with antispam protection: it happened recently, they were rejected by my
ISP, because of a bad SPF field.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

Yahoo! mail isn’t bad, nor is the new outlook.com.
For more industrial stuff you can get an email package
at godaddy.com if you sign up for webhosting. GoDaddy’s
email system has worked well for some domains I’ve worked
on. You can also get IMAP access and your own domain.
Not terribly expensive, but not ‘free’…banner ads
and datamining should be considered a pretty big fee.

The real cost for ISPs is dealing with spam; it is estimated that 98% of email is spam and the costs of dealing with it are a significant burden if you have few other income streams.

Many ISPs here no longer offer direct eMail accounts but instead suggest people use services like GMail or Outlook instead, or other free email providers that have POP/IMAP.

I get about 200 emails a day with my classical thunderbird interface and pop technology, about 100 are spam, about 70 from the Forums and about 30 are private or business. It’s a huge distraction and annoyance culling the spam. I don’t know how to improve it so I’m slowly changing to a bunch of gmail accounts, hoping that Google will control the spam.

I wish someone would invent something better.

On 2013-05-24 13:26, swerdna wrote:
>
> I get about 200 emails a day with my classical thunderbird interface and
> pop technology, about 100 are spam, about 70 from the Forums and about
> 30 are private or business. It’s a huge distraction and annoyance
> culling the spam. I don’t know how to improve it so I’m slowly changing
> to a bunch of gmail accounts, hoping that Google will control the spam.
>
> I wish someone would invent something better.

Weird… years ago I did get hundreds of spam posts. Now, almost none.
Except a few I’m getting to know “intimately” :-p

(my spam mail filters work pretty well, most of these are detected.
I get so few that I actually look at them to see who they are)

The spam I get come from a few persistent individual enterprises. One
pesky one (Sally from * at vcom.hk) insists on selling HDMI cables,
sending their entire catalog in a large attachment weighting a total of
2.4 MiB. Spam filters often ignore big emails, they are not analyzed at
all because of the cpu penalty… And this one subscribes to a few
opensuse.org mail lists, and sends its garbage to everybody. I have
complained about this to suse, to no avail (attachments were forbidden
by policy, should be automatically rejected).

This is the only one that bothers me - on occasion I have to use a
limited internet connection, limited to 500MB/month - so getting six of
those is a pain.

Interestingly, I can not filter them out in gmail - gmail thinks it is
spam, but as it matches the labels of the opensuse list sorting, it is
accepted.

There is some else that thinks I’m in the dog food business.

Another one (genixinfo) sends technical stuff in Brasillian Portuguese,
which I don’t read. He even sent an email one day telling that he was
changing mail address, so please whitelist his new emails. Nice of him.
Now they are all blacklisted, of course.

Maybe it is an individual that thinks the stuff really interests me, or
that I subscribed, but in Portuguese? Impossible.

Then there are other types. I’m subscribed to a site that sends job
offers. But they also started to send commercial posts with offers from
local business, without me opting-in for those. It took me a while to
find out where they come from. I opted-out, but they are still coming.
So I blacklisted them (* chtah.com).

Even Novell! Yes, I got a few from them, to. I think managed to convince
them I did not want those emails, I opted out.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

On 2013-05-23 23:26, john hudson wrote:
>
> The real cost for ISPs is dealing with spam; it is estimated that 98% of
> email is spam and the costs of dealing with it are a significant burden
> if you have few other income streams.

Yes, that’s a waste of resources, I can imagine.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

On 05/24/2013 01:26 PM, swerdna wrote:
> I don’t know how to improve it

thunderbird automatically shunts a LOT of my spam directly to it
“Junk” folder…it is just a matter of every time you get a spam,
mark it as such, and it ‘learns’ what is spam…

been doing that? if you have not been [or even if you have, maybe you
need to retrain] maybe you need to visit Edit > Preferences >
Security > Junk and checkmark “When I mark messages as junk: Move
them to the account’s “Junk” folder” and "Mark messages determined to
be Junk as read…

then, click the “Reset Training Data” button and patiently mark the
spam as such every time you see on…eventually you will find most
go automatically to the junk folder (a folder you should look into
every once in a while, and if you find a non-spam, then rescue it by
right click and “Mark as Not Junk” and that mail will zing back to
the in box and TB ‘learns’ that mail was not junk, so unlearns that
it was junk!

train up your TB in the way it should go, and . . .


dd

I’m with GofBorg.I pay $5/mo. for my own domain with unlimited email accounts and many other features. Changing your email is a pain, I know. I’ve done it once or twice. But it’s worth it. Once you’re set up you shouldn’t have to go through it again. I use Ubiquity for hosting personally, great support.

https://www.ubiquityhosting.com/

If you run your own email envrionment. deploy ASSP, it helps a lot.
I went from 800 spams a day in my own mailbox to less than 10 (which my mail
client then catches) I net ZERO in my Inbox, and it’s open source. :slight_smile:

http://www.magicvillage.de/~Fritz_Borgstedt/assp/0003D91C-8000001C/