IPv6 blocked by IPv4 NAT

Thank you to the openSUSE Travel team, only because of your support attending SCALE11x was the information in this post found which is being contributed directly through the openSUSE forums.
[HR][/HR]There has been questions asked over and over again in the Technical Help Forums where a common solution has been to “disable” or “turn off” IPv6.

The New Best Answer
Whenever a User finds himself in an IPv4 network where he needs to cross a NAT router which may be blocking IPv6, the User should simply sign up with a Tunnel Broker which will enable tunneling through to the Provider which provides a Gateway to the Internet. Just pick the tunnel broker that services your global region. Many tunneling methods are possible, but for most the “6in4” method should be most commonly used.

What is a tunnel broker
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunnelbroker

List of global Tunnel Brokers example: in NoAmerica, use Hurricane Electric
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunnel_brokers_list

On 2013-02-25 23:26, tsu2 wrote:
> The New Best Answer
> Whenever a User finds himself in an IPv4 network where he needs to
> cross a NAT router which may be blocking IPv6, the User should simply
> sign up with a Tunnel Broker which will enable tunneling through to the
> Provider which provides a Gateway to the Internet.

My preferred solution would be a DNS server not supplying IPv6
responses. Problem solved. :expressionless:

Sorry, I play dumb and lazy in this. I’m not interested in using IPv6
till my ISP supplies it.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

That attitude migh change when you feel need to access an IPv6 only site :wink:
Well you may still be forced into not using IPv6 until your ISP does it, but I guess you will press your ISP then to become a llittle bit more “state of the art”.

On 2013-02-26 10:26, hcvv wrote:

> That attitude migh change when you feel need to access an IPv6 only
> site :wink:

True enough.

> Well you may still be forced into not using IPv6 until your ISP does
> it, but I guess you will press your ISP then to become a llittle bit
> more “state of the art”.

I’d love my ISPs (plural) to be more state of the art. I use three. None
offers IPv6 :frowning:

But, they do not feel the need of supplying it, so they don’t.

Hey, I would like myself to be state of the art. I know very little of
IPv6. I did a training course recently, 400+ hours, with the official
backing of the European Community and of the Spanish government.

IPv6 was not in the program. It was just mentioned, one hour.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

As many subjects, it is of course allways interesting to know more internals about IPv6 (and a good start might be Wikipedia). But in fact much understandings is not needed, even if you are the system manager of openSUSE system(s). When your ISP is fully IPv6 capable, you switch it on using YaST and that is it. It works parallel to IPv4 and you normaly do not bother which one is used in which connection. It is all in the black box.

Reasons for the moment I can think of to <not> recommend disabling IPv6

With the imminent exhaustion of IPv4 addresses, Internet resources like websites may be accessible only by using an IPv6 address.

You yourself may wish to be accessible on the Internet, eg home webcam, home security, personal webserver, location based prototocols/services like SIP, etc. Today traversing NAT and exposing a private address resource requires an Internet proxy. IPv6 simplifies and removes latencies.

Security, IPv6 supports end to end encapsulation without worrying about Gateway and NAT issues.

When IPv6 is supported when the faulty obstacle is upgraded/removed, you won’t have to worry about re-configuring the machine.

IMO,
TSU

On 2013-02-26 17:46, tsu2 wrote:
>
> Reasons for the moment I can think of to <not> recommend disabling IPv6

All those advantages are true, but as the ISPs do not provide IPv6, they
are pointless.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

On 2013-02-26 16:46, hcvv wrote:

> As many subjects, it is of course allways interesting to know more
> internals about IPv6 (and a good start might be Wikipedia). But in fact
> much understandings is not needed, even if you are the system manager of
> openSUSE system(s). When your ISP is fully IPv6 capable, you switch it
> on using YaST and that is it. It works parallel to IPv4 and you normaly
> do not bother which one is used in which connection. It is all in the
> black box.

If the professionals that have to implement network are not trained in
IPv6, will they be willing to do it?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

There are at least two way of learning anything… Waiting for someone
to send you to a class or being curious enough to just dig in. One of
the most enjoyable and quickest ways of learning “just enough” IPv6
is provided by Hurricane Electric. A guided, practical, step by step
training where you practice every step by honing your own IPv6
tunnel connection provided by them, totally free of charge. All you
need to bring is your curiosity.
You are ten minutes from having an IPv6 tunnel from Hurricane Electric Free IPv6 Tunnel Broker
and a few enjoyable hours from Hurricane Electric IPv6 Certification

Learning is fun.
matti

:slight_smile:
“Soon” there may not be any choice. Exactly when, unknown.
We’re on borrowed time now for at least 3 years when early prognosticators claimed IPv4 addresses would be exhausted but of course the sky didn’t fall. But, as time grows and particularly assuming big 3rd world country growth and use of the Internet, there can’t be any question it will happen “soon.”

For anyone who is installing 12.3 shortly, they especially are on the clock whether they are forced to use IPv6 within the next 18 mths or so.

TSU

On 03/01/2013 11:46 PM, tsu2 wrote:

> :slight_smile:
> “Soon” there may not be any choice. Exactly when, unknown.

I know.

> We’re on borrowed time now for at least 3 years when early
> prognosticators claimed IPv4 addresses would be exhausted but of course
> the sky didn’t fall. But, as time grows and particularly assuming big
> 3rd world country growth and use of the Internet, there can’t be any
> question it will happen “soon.”

That does not matter in many first world countries, there are enough
addresses. So, who cares?

For example, in my country, Spain, the worries are the economical
crisis, so who is going to invest on all those access routers that have
to be changed? Who is going to pay for them?

> For anyone who is installing 12.3 shortly, they especially are on the
> clock whether they are forced to use IPv6 within the next 18 mths or so.

Why so?

Right now, I’m using 12.3. I do have an IPv6 local address, now that I
look. But it is not an address given by the house router, which ignores
DHCP6 requests.

This house networking was contracted less than two months ago, the
router is brand new…


Cheers/Saludos
Carlos E. R. (12.3 Dartmouth test at Minas-Anor)

If headlines and this wikipedia artile can be relied upon,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv4_address_exhaustion

All address blocks have been allocated in Europe and the Developing Third World. “Allocated” does not necessarily mean “used,” in anticipation of the certain date when all addresses will be used, there has been a lot of hoarding, and it’s estimated today that as many as 30% of all addresses remain unused today.

Estimates approx 3 yrs ago suggested that real shortages might begin to appear between this year and a couple years from now, but various “emergency” steps <may> delay the inevitable a bit longer… primarily more efficient use of available addresses by taking back and re-assigning unallocated addresses and allocating in a more efficient manner, eg “Did you really need <all> those Class A addresses even if a Class B address space isn’t large enough?”

So,
It seems that “it depends” largely on where a person is, and how active the anticipated growth of the Internet will be in your region as to whether you will see shortages,

TSU

On 2013-03-02 20:26, tsu2 wrote:
> So,
> It seems that “it depends” largely on where a person is, and how active
> the anticipated growth of the Internet will be in your region as to
> whether you will see shortages,

Absolutely.

And as long as the ISPs on each country don’t feel pressed, they will do
nothing. Just talk about it. I hope they have plans, and my fear is they
will “sell” new hardware to clients.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))