Installed Nvida driver for opensuse resulting in kernel pannic

I get a kernel panic after installing the Nvidia driver for opensuse. I have Opensuse 13.1 and I noticed immediately after installing the driver a notice about drive space being low on /boot. Upon reboot I remember seeing something in regards to VHD and unable to mount fs / or something. I believe that the driver has modified my boot partition which was 100MB in size. I am new to opensuse and linux for that matter and do not know how to solve this kernel panic, or even how to get some log files for you to see. Could someone please suggest a solution, and is there a way to boot from grub on usb as I have read that to be an option somewhere. Please forgive my ignorance if this has been asked, I have been searching Google but unable to locate the solution. A post on some other distro mentioned something to do with initrd might have been changed by Nvida but I don’t know how to fix that.

Please note that when I installed Opensuse, I unpluged my primary hard drive (1TB) leaving the (500GB Sata) pluged in to be used for linux. With only the target drive pluged in everything installed under hda1 with a custom partitoning where I made a boot part of 100MB ext2, a 2GB swap, about 25GB / (root) ext4, and the remaining space went to /home on a XFS file system. Not sure if this has anything to do with the problem. I have two drives pluged in where my untouched 1TB drive has windows 7 and I boot into opensuse by selecting the drive from my BIOS boot menu

Ok Why did you make a separate boot? You have a real reason or did you just read it some where? Ok in any case the info you got must have been old since 100 meg is not big enough for 13…1 since it keeps multiple kernels so you can drop back if you have a problem. So 300 meg should be min amount. When a new kernel is added the older one is kept and you can boot to it using the advanced boot option. When the next update happens you halve 3 kernels when you successfully boot to the new one the oldest of the 3 is deleted. So you need space for 3 kernels plus the initd stuff

Since you are using ext4 for root there is no real need for a separate boot

Thank you, The reason for choosing a 100MB boot partition came from http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Installation_on_external_hard_drive which I thought would help me install to my second internal hard drive but I now how to rethink why I followed this since I was not using an external. In either case is there a way that I can remove the /boot partition, resize it or have a usb drive boot for me instead, or do I need to do a new install.

If I need to re install, are you sure 300MB will be big enough, is ext2 the best choice for it and is there another way I can dualboot without resizing my windows hard drive. Also should I bother installing the nvidia driver if it causes this problem since I will be primarily using opensuse for python3 programming and learning. I only installed it so that I can watch youtube videos in beter quality, between programming sessions where I noticed that youtube would render but with some artifacts that did not show up when displaying in HD on win 7.

Wow! That’s way out of date.

ext2 is fine if you want a separate boot but you don’t need a separate boot

300 should be fine but that is a min if you want make it 500 then you are pretty future safe no matter how big kernels grow

NVIDIA does not cause a problem not enough space and possibly a kernel update caused the problem. If you want good 3d Accel for 3D games you need it otherwise nouveau
is fine for most things

Well depends on how the partitions are laid out on the drive but generally speaking it may be far easier to reinstall. If you keep your current home unmoved/sized and tell the installer NOT to format it your personal stuff is preserved. You could move and resize stuff but that is pron to error and can destroy your data any way

Thank you both, here is what I have decided to do. I am going to try to install opensuse again this time choosing 500M for the boot partition and I dont care about any of the data on that hard drive, my programming files are all on usb and the other stuff I care about is on my windows drive so opensuse can do what it wants with the drive.

As others have noted, that is an extremely old SDB but IMO more importantly

It describes a separate boot partition only because that specific hardware configuration requires it (Installing on external media).

If your drives are internal and won’t be moved around after install, there is no need for a separate boot partition as described in that SDB.

Recommend:

  • Re-installation (Since existing boot partition is too small for any use, this is almost a no-brainer.
  • Unless you are installing into some kind of unconventional configuration (like an external hard drive), accept the default configuration. Personally, the only choice I sometimes change is to mount a separate /home partition when installing on a tiny hard drive or the install will be used as a Server (therefor all apps and data will be installed into system locations, not User locations). The logic behind this decision is similar to deciding on a separate boot partition, although there <can> be benefits to configuring a separate partition, it will mean inefficient use of space (because it’s unlikely you can guess the partition’s needs exactly you will have to over-allocate) and potential trouble as you’ve discovered.

TSU

Thank you tsu2 I will take your recommendations of removing the boot partition all together and accepting the default suggested config, I learned the lesson of checking article dates and being more cautious about trying to apply instructions that were intended for a external config to an internal config. When I first attempted the install it was wanting to use sda which had my windows partition so I aborted the install, removed my windows drive all together and then found that old article. My apologies for bothering you with this problem. I see green lights in the future, also I wont be messing with stuff for the most part after its installed except getting the newer python3 installed, and another terminal emulator. The sole purpose is to listen and watch music videos while programming in python3 solving programming challenges.

On 2014-06-04 21:46, backwardsbyte wrote:
>
> Thank you tsu2 I will take your recommendations of removing the boot
> partition all together and accepting the default suggested config, I
> learned the lesson of checking article dates and being more cautious
> about trying to apply instructions that were intended for a external
> config to an internal config.

The article is old, but that is not the issue. It uses a separate boot
partition for a very specific reason:

The intention there is to install on an external disk via USB. This
could be unplugged accidentally while running, and the filesystem could
get corrupted badly enough to not boot again.

So the trick the article proposes is using a small separate “/boot”
partition which while the system is running is mounted read only; thus a
sudden removal would not harm it. The rest of the system would get
normal partitioning, r/w.

But that is not your case, you are not using an external disk via usb.
And even if you do, it is not required to install that way. The article,
like many others in Internet, just proposes an idea.

A separate boot partition is a trick, that has been used over the years
to solve specific problems when booting. And those problems are, over
the years, fewer and fewer. Only on few specific circumstances you need,
or may need it.

Examples:

  • Some raid configurations.
  • Some LVM configurations.
  • That root is encrypted.
  • That root is on a different disk.
  • That root is on a filesystem type that is not supported by the boot
    code (grub, lilo). Recently it was the case for btrfs, but I think it
    has been solved, maybe not always. Years ago it affected XFS and
    reiserfs (the last only when hibernation is used).

> When I first attempted the install it was
> wanting to use sda which had my windows partition so I aborted the
> install, removed my windows drive all together and then found that old
> article.

Just removing the disk would have been good enough :slight_smile:

It is possible to tell the installer to leave alone the main disk. But
you have to look carefully at the selections, and not leave it to
automatics. Removing the main disk is a wise trick to make sure, I use
it sometimes: I did it recently in order to install Windows on a spare
disk making sure it did not even think of touching my Linux disks :wink:

> My apologies for bothering you with this problem. I see green
> lights in the future, also I wont be messing with stuff for the most
> part after its installed except getting the newer python3 installed, and
> another terminal emulator. The sole purpose is to listen and watch
> music videos while programming in python3 solving programming
> challenges.

No need to apologize. Enjoy :slight_smile:


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 13.1 x86_64 “Bottle” at Telcontar)