install wine in opensuse 11.4 kde 64bit

can i install wine by adding this URL to my yast repository and is it the correct way
http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/emulators:wine/opensuse_11.4/ wine

When I open up YaST / Software / Software Management and search on wine, I find it without adding in any more repositories. Just check off Wine when found and any added packages it adds for you and allow them to be installed. The URL you have is wrong even if you wanted to use it, which is not needed to fetch wine. The correct URL is (don’t include the quotes):

"http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/Emulators/openSUSE_11.4/"

Thank You,

Wine Opensuse 11.4 64bit i was reading on this post where it said the one in the repo was no good to you.

so went looking around for another way to install the correct one
thanks

So, based on what I read, caf4926 was suggesting to upgrade it using the EXACT commands as shown. The repository was called (without the quotes “”)

"http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/Emulators:/Wine/openSUSE_11.4/"

It was suggested that you install wine from the default repository first and then following the instructions exactly as provided in message #3. May I also say that be careful when using Windows programs, at least with anything like a browser. If you need a browser, use Firefox or use something like VirtualBox to run Windows under Linux (with the appropriate Windows anti-virus loaded). Most people that play with Wine are trying to use Windows games in Linux which is OK. But remember that 100x more viruses and other attacks exist for Windows and Wine is a possible entry point you do not want to ignore. As always, such is my opinion on the subject.

Thank You,

It’s is the standard repos

Open a terminal and do

su -
zypper in wine

On 09/05/2011 04:16 AM, jdmcdaniel3 wrote:
>
> Most people that play with Wine
> are trying to use Windows games in Linux which is OK. But remember
> that 100x more viruses and other attacks exist for Windows and Wine is a
> possible entry point you do not want to ignore.

i agree absolutely! if you want to play Windows games, boot Windows and
take your chances with worms, rootkits, and etc…

and, if you want to have a place that is safe for your (for example)
banking activities, online purchases, sensitive communications,
homework, doctoral thesis and etc…then have a linux system with zero
means for a windows leak…

keep your work/school/important stuff on linux and use Windows for what
it is best for: games.

and, don’t let the two meet in any way…

ymmv

ps: if you are required to run programs like MS-Office for your work or
school…then boot windows and run them…but, (as we know) be VERY careful.


DD
Caveat

On Mon, 05 Sep 2011 02:16:02 +0000, jdmcdaniel3 wrote:

> Most people that play with Wine are trying to
> use Windows games in Linux which is OK. But remember that 100x more
> viruses and other attacks exist for Windows and Wine is a possible entry
> point you do not want to ignore.

This is certainly true; I prefer using WINE through Crossover Office,
which integrates ClamAV for this purpose.

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

Windows viruses cannot live in wine, because of way wine works.
They would have to infect linux with windows specific viruses, and this is rather impossible.
There is no windows kernel, no windows services, no windows drivers, not a single line of microsoft code, not a single windows bug and exploit present.

It’s just a windows API emulator, not whole windows emulator.

Wine sever is serving API compatibility layer just for application launched by user, but there is no windows at all there, just a windows app running on linux.
Once app is closed, wine shuts down too.

Also, viruses tend to use low level and/or undocumented functions, often bypassing windows API, and all low level stuff and code execution is done by linux itself (something viruses don’t really expect :wink: ).

Even if there was virus that was written properly enough (using documented API and not exploiting windows bugs) to execute under wine:

  1. it could only infect windows executables, probably only /home/.wine directory.
  2. it means the user infected it’s wine almost intentionally, by launching infected exe (there is no other way to infect).
  3. it would be very easy to track down and kill (wineserver is running although there is no legitimate app working, and there is strange unknown exe on linux process list). Nothing can hide.

So, while it’s not impossible, it’s rather unlikely.
Linux with wine is not windows. It’s still a 100% linux extended by windows API, that can run (some) windows applications.

On 09/07/2011 08:16 AM, sobrus wrote:
>
> So, while it’s not impossible, it’s rather unlikely.
> Linux with wine is not windows. It’s still a 100% linux that can run
> (some) windows applications.

good review (i’m gonna make a note of its location, to reference to
later)…

but, how about real windows running i a VM?

or, real windows running in a root launched VM? (would it be possible
for a specially built exploit to gain access to the host and install a
rootkit, or . . .??


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

On Wed, 07 Sep 2011 06:16:02 +0000, sobrus wrote:

> Windows viruses cannot live in wine, because of way wine works. They
> would have to infect linux with windows specific viruses, and this is
> rather impossible.

Well, yes and no. It depends on the virus and how it’s implemented. For
example, an Excel macro virus would run just fine as long as Excel runs.
How much damage it can do may be limited, but the macro would in fact
still be able to run.

> There is no windows kernel, no windows services, no windows drivers, not
> a single line of microsoft code, not a single windows bug and exploit
> present.

No moreso than a bug might have to be emulated to get the proper
behaviour. That’s one thing about Windows APIs (and APIs in general) -
sometimes developers become dependent on what originally is ‘buggy’
behaviour, and so the ‘bug’ becomes a ‘feature’.

> Wine sever is serving API compatibility layer just for application
> launched by user, but there is no windows at all there, just a windows
> app running on linux.
> Once app is closed, wine shuts down too.

I have found that not to always be the case - wineserver does sometimes
keep running.

> Also, viruses tend to use low level and/or undocumented functions, often
> bypassing windows API, and all low level stuff and code execution is
> done by linux itself (something viruses don’t really expect :wink: ).

Undocumented functions often have to be implemented in order to get apps
running - just because Microsoft doesn’t document it doesn’t mean it
isn’t documented (as an example, I just have to look over at the
bookshelf here in my office and see the “Undocumented DOS” and
“Undocumented PC” books on it).

> Even if there was linux that was written properly enough (using
> documented API and not exploiting windows bugs) to execute under wine:
> 1) it could only infect windows executables, probably only /home/.wine
> directory.

Probably not, most WINE installations default to having the home
directory as a separate drive letter IME.

> 2) it means the user infected it’s wine almost intentionally, by
> launching infected exe (there is no other way to infect). 3) it would be
> very easy to track down and kill (wineserver is running although there
> is no legitimate app working, and there is strange unknown exe on linux
> process list).

It certainly is true that such a virus would be easier to disable and
get rid of if it got in through WINE than on a native Windows system.

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

That’s not what the Wine project says: FAQ - The Official Wine Wiki
One thing you’re overlooking is that it is possible to write a Windows app that can detect it is running in Wine and adjust its behavior accordingly. AFAIK, this has not yet happened with any malware, but that doesn’t mean it never will. And apps running in Wine can do anything the user can, like, say, wipe out your home directory.

@hendersj
Yes, you can probably still infect your Wine (but not linux) by using application specific viruses, as the application code is “real”. But the same goes for linux applications, we can’t blame wine for that,
On my machine wineserver closes few seconds after app closes. But YMMV of course.

You’re right about undocumented API, but currently Wine emulates only most used API functions and I don’t know if they plan to implement undocumented ones.
Developers writing legitimate apps avoid such functions to ensure better compatibility with various windows versions.

Wine has access to root (Z: ), home (Documents and Settings), and .wine (C: ) directory (and any other you set).
But only user directories are enabled for writing, and outside .wine there is usually little to infect (no windows binaries).

@DenverD
If you run real windows using VM - it’s a spearate computer using real windows code. You can even assign separate IP for this machine. So any windows virus can infect it just like real windows.
But unless you share your folders and/or network with it - you’re absolutely safe. Virus is not aware that it isn’t running on real hardware, you can get rid of its whole world using few clicks :wink:

Windows viruses running on VM can only infect other windows machines and executables.

On Thu, 08 Sep 2011 06:16:02 +0000, sobrus wrote:

> @HENDERSJ
> Yes, you can probably still infect your Wine (but not linux) by using
> application specific viruses, as the application code is “real”. But the
> same goes for linux applications, we can’t blame wine for that, On my
> machine wineserver closes few seconds after app closes. But YMMV of
> course.

It’s not a question of ‘blaming’ wine or not - my point was there are
attack vectors that WINE makes available, and as others said, a Windows
virus that will run under WINE can do anything the user can do. I don’t
know about you, but I find it far easier to reinstall an OS than to
recover files that have been deleted by some piece of malware.

> You’re right about undocumented API, but currently Wine emulates only
> most used API functions and I don’t know if they plan to implement
> undocumented ones.

I don’t know that this is the case. One of the underlying goals of WINE
was to be able to run Microsoft Office. It stands to reason that if
Microsoft uses undocumented APIs in their code (and that’s something
they’ve been known to do - and something they’ve been taken to task for
in antitrust suits), then emulating those APIs as Office expects them to
be implemented would seem to be a critical piece of making that product
run.

> Developers writing legitimate apps avoid such functions to ensure better
> compatibility with various windows versions.

That’s simply not been true historically. Developers writing legitimate
applications use the tools available to them in order to make them do
what they want. The reason, for example, that I have a couple books on
undocumented DOS functions is because I had need to use them to
accomplish goals in code that otherwise couldn’t be done. Those
applications were “legitimate”.

> Wine has access to root (Z: ), home (Documents and Settings), and .wine
> (C: ) directory.
> But only user directories are enabled for writing, and outside .wine
> there is usually little to infect (no windows binaries).

It’s not just about the executables, it’s also about the data.

> @DENVERD
> If you run real windows using VM - it’s a spearate computer using real
> windows code. You can even assign separate IP for this machine. So any
> windows virus can infect it just like real windows. But unless you share
> your folders and/or network with it - you’re absolutely safe.

That’s not necessarily true. VMware, for example, provides an API that
(if enabled in the VM) can let the guest talk to the host.

Jim

Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C