Install 11.2 Buggy need root all the time until i fix issues

I have a buggy install, 11.2 and I need to be root to look around/change/fix I’m tired of being asked twice for a security code for any change/tweak/install/config when im trying to fix the issue. Which of your multiple applications do I use to make myself root? Yast doesn’t seem to be doing the trick.

I have eth config issues, grub issues, application update issues, security config issues, right now i just want security login issues to be fixed so im not asked a thousand times for my admin rights.

In the latest version of Opensuse, the default is to use the same password for root as for the primary user. Did you override this and use a separate password for root?

At any rate, at a terminal prompt, simply login as root. Ditto for KDE or Gnome – if you’re logged in as a regular user, right click and select “end current session,” then log in again as root. If you can’t, post back. Once you’re logged in as root, simply start Yast and run it that way. (Do NOT browse the Web as root, though, and don’t stay in a GUI as root for any longer than absolutely necessary.)

I’ve never noticed Opensuse asking for a root password all that often (and I make quite a few changes), but frankly, I’m glad it does. An operating system that runs you as administrator/root are far more subject to tampering and malware.

smpoole7 wrote:

> for KDE
> or Gnome – if you’re logged in as a regular user, right click and
> select “end current session,” then log in again as root. If you can’t,
> post back. Once you’re logged in as root, simply start Yast and run it
> that way. (Do NOT browse the Web as root, though, and don’t stay in a
> GUI as root for any longer than absolutely necessary.)

this is VERY bad advice, please do not give it again…

it can only lead to more trouble than aid…if the OP doesn’t have the
patience to do Linux correctly, maybe s/he should not do it at all,
read more:

http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Login_as_root
http://docs.kde.org/stable/en/kdebase-runtime/userguide/root.html
http://tinyurl.com/6ry6yd
http://tinyurl.com/ydbwssh


palladium

On 02/28/2010 03:40 AM, palladium wrote:
> smpoole7 wrote:
>
>> for KDE
>> or Gnome – if you’re logged in as a regular user, right click and
>> select “end current session,” then log in again as root. If you can’t,
>> post back. Once you’re logged in as root, simply start Yast and run it
>> that way. (Do NOT browse the Web as root, though, and don’t stay in a
>> GUI as root for any longer than absolutely necessary.)
>
> this is VERY bad advice, please do not give it again…
>
> it can only lead to more trouble than aid…if the OP doesn’t have the
> patience to do Linux correctly, maybe s/he should not do it at all,
> read more:
>
> http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Login_as_root
> http://docs.kde.org/stable/en/kdebase-runtime/userguide/root.html
> http://tinyurl.com/6ry6yd
> http://tinyurl.com/ydbwssh
>

Well the OP should consider reinstalling his/her installation.

However, I don’t think the login as root is such a catastrophe for
correcting errors and issues. There’s risks yes but they’re minimal on
the WWW of a hacker waiting for the precise moment a user is the root!!!

There’s some things a user must do with root privileges to post install
to get his/her system working correctly. Newbies will learn in time to
use safer methods.

On 02/27/2010 05:26 PM, xtrchessreal wrote:
>
> I have a buggy install, 11.2 and I need to be root to look
> around/change/fix I’m tired of being asked twice for a security code for
> any change/tweak/install/config when im trying to fix the issue. Which
> of your multiple applications do I use to make myself root? Yast
> doesn’t seem to be doing the trick.
>
> I have eth config issues, grub issues, application update issues,
> security config issues, right now i just want security login issues to
> be fixed so im not asked a thousand times for my admin rights.
>
>

Did you use the LiveCD for your installation?? Are you sure everything
installed cleanly without problem??? Lots of buggy problems sound to me
like a bad install, so, I ask.

You’re making a general description of your errors but what are your
specific problems that we can help?

You can create the sudoers file whereby you give yourself root
permissions to all programs and/or some programs, and even set it up so
you don’t have to key in a password.

-> Man sudo

OTOH, you should be using “YaST” and the “Menu” to setup/configure your
OpenSuSe installation including the sudoers file.

YaST usually asks for the root password only once.

> However, I don’t think the login as root is such a catastrophe for
> correcting errors and issues. There’s risks yes but they’re minimal on
> the WWW of a hacker waiting for the precise moment a user is the root!!!

you think wrong…browsing as root is not the only hazard…and
logging into kde/gnome/etc as root is never ever required to do any
admin/root duty, immediately after an initial install or any other time…

there is always a way to do it correctly…


palladium

On 02/28/2010 12:45 PM, palladium wrote:
>> However, I don’t think the login as root is such a catastrophe for
>> correcting errors and issues. There’s risks yes but they’re minimal on
>> the WWW of a hacker waiting for the precise moment a user is the root!!!
>
> you think wrong…browsing as root is not the only hazard…and
> logging into kde/gnome/etc as root is never ever required to do any
> admin/root duty, immediately after an initial install or any other time…
>
> there is always a way to do it correctly…
>

Like I said some times you get stuck and you need to login as root to
fix things or you’re in a root screen and you want to take a quick look
at something. Nothing wrong with that.

Generally, I agree Sudo, YaST and Menu, typically handle most things but
it depends on how well you know GUI YaST or whether you’re on CLI
screens, non-GUI system, like, a ssh terminal session.

But this is a matter of opinion. You have a right to yours, and I have mine. I disagree with you. There are times when it just makes sense to log into KDE as root for a minute or two to do certain tasks. I do it, and further, you’re expected to do it in some cases, if you believe the how-tos on the Web.

Explain to me precisely and in detail how it is inherently more dangerous to go into KDE or Gnome as root, for example, to run “nvidia-settings,” then immediately log back out, as opposed to opening a terminal, doing “su” and starting it from there. What risks am I taking? Tell me specifically how I will be attacked in that case.

You can’t do it, aside from a general belief that “it’s wrong to use a GUI as root!”

I realize that you’ll disagree and that there have been flame wars all over the Web about this (especially about distros that run you as root). But like I said, we’ll just agree to disagree.

To me, this falls into the same category as those passionate arguments from the Ubuntu crowd about “sudo” vs. “su.” It’s a tempest in a teacup.

Now, if someone logs into KDE as root all the time, browses the Web and checks email as root, that’s a horse of a different color. Of course I think that’s wrong (though the argument could also be made that you’re only small step removed from that when you use a “live” CD that essentially runs you as the root user).

noi wrote:
> Generally, I agree Sudo, YaST and Menu, typically handle most things but
> it depends on how well you know GUI YaST or whether you’re on CLI
> screens, non-GUI system, like, a ssh terminal session.

sudo, su, kdesu//gnomesu, YaST and many other root powered
applications and utilities will not just handle “most things” but,
instead they will handle “all things”…

you are correct “it depends on how well you know” your way around
Linux…and, there is no good reason i can think of to say:

because you don’t know how to do it the correct and safe way go ahead
and do it the wrong/unsafe way…

ymmv


palladium

smpoole7 wrote:

> But this is a matter of opinion.

i am sorry to inform you that it is not an opinion, it is fact that
one should never log into any UNIX[tm] or similar operating system’s
GUI as the superuser…it has been that way since the first *nix with
a ‘windows’ server was developed…

however, if you want to consider it an opinion and do it on your
machine, that is okay with me…just do not, please, advise new folks
here to do administrative tasks your way, because you think it is okay…

as mentioned earlier: you think wrongly…

sorry, but you have been misinformed on this, and i ask you to not
misinform new folks here…please!

> and further, you’re expected to do it in some cases, if you believe
> the how-tos on the Web.

do you believe all how-tos on the web are correct?
i can tell you for sure that any which require the user to log into
the GUI as root are just flat wrong…

find one and i’ll do my best to explain why/how to do the job without
logging into the GUI as root…

>
> Tell me specifically how I will be attacked in that case.

as mentioned ‘attacked’ is not the only way to harm a system by
running a root KDE/etc…

read around…at least, carefully read those cite i already provided…

> You can’t do it, aside from a general belief that “it’s wrong to use a
> GUI as root!”

search these fora for folks who can no longer log into their own user
account, not because they browsed the net as root but simply because
they logged into KDE/GNOME as root and then moved around in their own
home directory to quickly look at/do something, and then poof, their
~/.ICEauthority is broken…

> I realize that you’ll disagree

yes, if it were my opinion that your opinion was wrong i would
disagree…and, if you are in fact wrong i am willing to try to help
you understand the non-opinion facts of this matter…

if you are unwilling to accept the facts then do as you wish with your
own machine…but, please do not ‘infect’ new folks with incorrect
‘beliefs’…

thanks!


palladium

On 03/01/2010 03:26 AM, palladium wrote:
> smpoole7 wrote:
>
>> But this is a matter of opinion.
>
> i am sorry to inform you that it is not an opinion, it is fact that
> one should never log into any UNIX[tm] or similar operating system’s
> GUI as the superuser…it has been that way since the first *nix with
> a ‘windows’ server was developed…
>
> however, if you want to consider it an opinion and do it on your
> machine, that is okay with me…just do not, please, advise new folks
> here to do administrative tasks your way, because you think it is okay…
>
> as mentioned earlier: you think wrongly…
>
> sorry, but you have been misinformed on this, and i ask you to not
> misinform new folks here…please!
>
>
>> and further, you’re expected to do it in some cases, if you believe
>> the how-tos on the Web.
>
> do you believe all how-tos on the web are correct?
> i can tell you for sure that any which require the user to log into
> the GUI as root are just flat wrong…
>
> find one and i’ll do my best to explain why/how to do the job without
> logging into the GUI as root…
>
>>
>> Tell me specifically how I will be attacked in that case.
>
> as mentioned ‘attacked’ is not the only way to harm a system by
> running a root KDE/etc…
>
> read around…at least, carefully read those cite i already provided…
>
>
>
>> You can’t do it, aside from a general belief that “it’s wrong to use a
>> GUI as root!”
>
> search these fora for folks who can no longer log into their own user
> account, not because they browsed the net as root but simply because
> they logged into KDE/GNOME as root and then moved around in their own
> home directory to quickly look at/do something, and then poof, their
> ~/.ICEauthority is broken…
>

Exactly and now that you’ve messed up ~/.ICEauthority how would you fix
or if your /tmp is full and you can’t log on ? Or simply forgot the
user password.

Please, there’s no law against using the root, su, just be careful. If
developers didn’t need you to root privileges there wouldn’t be a root id.

>
>> I realize that you’ll disagree
>
> yes, if it were my opinion that your opinion was wrong i would
> disagree…and, if you are in fact wrong i am willing to try to help
> you understand the non-opinion facts of this matter…
>
> if you are unwilling to accept the facts then do as you wish with your
> own machine…but, please do not ‘infect’ new folks with incorrect
> ‘beliefs’…
>
> thanks!
>

noi wrote:

> Exactly and now that you’ve messed up ~/.ICEauthority how would you fix

EASY to fix without logging into KDE/etc as root…just boot to run
level three, go to your /home and use chmod to change your
~/.ICEauthority properties back to you as the owner and only one able
to read/write…

> or if your /tmp is full and you can’t log on?

to fix a full /tmp: boot from a Live CD and empty /tmp, or boot from
hard drive to run level three, log on as root and with GREAT caution
delete only those file which are NOT being used by the system (i do
not know how to do that, so i would always use a live CD…

> Or simply forgot the user password.

log in to runlevel 3 as root and set a new password for the user with
the command passwd

> Please, there’s no law against using the root, su, just be careful. If
> developers didn’t need you to root privileges there wouldn’t be a root id.

i think maybe you miss the entire point of what i am saying: there is
NOTHING wrong with using su in a terminal, or launching YaST/file
manager in superuser mode/and others and giving the root password
while logged into KDE/etc as yourself…

i have said only: do not log into KDE/etc as root…ALWAYS log into
KDE/etc as yourself and then become root in a terminal using su, sudo,
kdesu, gnomesu and probably other ways…perfectly OK…

but, DO NOT log into any graphical user interface desktop
environment (KDE, Gnome, XFCE, LXDE, etc etc etc) as root…


palladium

Again, then why will some support folks, and some how-tos tell you to do just that? For that matter, why does the Mac OS (derived from BSD, IIRC) essentially run as root? What about Live CDs that run you as the equivalent of root? I noticed you didn’t even answer that one. :slight_smile:

Why does Opensuse even permit it, if it’s so evil? All they’d have to do is set “AllowRootLogin=false” in the KDE config (many distros do).

We probably ought to take this over the Chit-Chat or even Soapbox, rather than hijack the poor OP’s thread like this. But just for the record, I don’t advocate running a GUI as root. I want to be clear about that, and I realize that my first post here might have mislead you, causing your strong response. I do log in to KDE or Gnome as root from time to time, but I do so for one, specific task, then immediately log back out. And to be safe, we OUGHT to warn newbies about this, and especially about “dragging and dropping” files in a file manager (because they’ll have default root ownership, which could confuse them). It’s not something I recommend casually and repeatedly.

~/.ICEauthority is broken …

Ummm … no. The way that .ICEauthority (and several other user-specific config files, for that matter) can be broken is running a GUI application while SU’d to root from a terminal. If you log into the GUI as root, run the command very quickly and then log back out, you will NOT hose .ICEauthority. In fact, this is one reason why I do it. :slight_smile:

please do not ‘infect’ new folks with incorrect
‘beliefs’…

I will be clearer in the future if I ever recommend this again, but go ahead and have your “you are wrong!” response canned and ready to go, because I WILL recommend it – in the “nvidia-settings” case, just to name one of many.

If I was the only one who felt this way, I might be more concerned. I’m not.

Hi,

smpoole7 <smpoole7@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> writes:

> palladium;2128654 Wrote:
>> i am sorry to inform you that it is not an opinion, it is fact that
>> one should never log into any UNIX[tm] or similar operating system’s
>> GUI as the superuser…
>
> Again, then why will some support folks, and some how-tos tell you to
> do just that? For that matter, why does the Mac OS (derived from BSD,
> IIRC) essentially run as root? What about Live CDs that run you as the
> equivalent of root? I noticed you didn’t even answer that one. :slight_smile:
>

Although Live-CDs don’t always have a root password, you don’t get
automatically logged in as root; moreover you won’t harm a live-CDs
while logged in as root, as they are live-CDs.

> Why does Opensuse even permit it, if it’s so evil? All they’d have to
> do is set “AllowRootLogin=false” in the KDE config (many distros do).
>
> We probably ought to take this over the Chit-Chat or even Soapbox,
> rather than hijack the poor OP’s thread like this. But just for the
> record, I don’t advocate running a GUI as root. I want to be clear
> about that, and I realize that my first post here might have mislead
> you, causing your strong response. I do log in to KDE or Gnome as root
> from time to time, but I do so for one, specific task, then immediately
> log back out. And to be safe, we OUGHT to warn newbies about this, and
> especially about “dragging and dropping” files in a file manager
> (because they’ll have default root ownership, which could confuse them).
> It’s not something I recommend casually and repeatedly.
>
>>
>> ~/.ICEauthority is broken …
>>
>
> Ummm … no. The way that .ICEauthority (and several other
> user-specific config files, for that matter) can be broken is -running a
> GUI application while SU’d to root from a terminal.- If you log into the
> GUI as root, run the command very quickly and then log back out, you
> will NOT hose .ICEauthority. In fact, this is one reason why I do it.
> :slight_smile:
>
>
>>
>> please do not ‘infect’ new folks with incorrect
>> ‘beliefs’…
>>
>
> I will be clearer in the future if I ever recommend this again, but go
> ahead and have your “you are wrong!” response canned and ready to go,
> because I WILL recommend it – in the “nvidia-settings” case, just to
> name one of many.
>
> If I was the only one who felt this way, I might be more concerned. I’m
> not.

This certainly isn’t a popular practice and, as what you suggest can
cause more harm than good to a new user’s system, it’s not a good idea
to suggest it.

You are entitled to do as you wish with your machine, but be
VERY careful with the advice you give to others who may be less
experienced than yourself.


Regards,
Barry Nichols

Note that I said “as the equivalent of root.” I chose my words carefully. :slight_smile:

As far as I’m concerned, if you can click an “Install” button, or if the user of a Live CD can click on existing partitions and start manipulating existing files (I’m not sure if you can do this with Opensuse’s live CD, but I know you can do it with others, because I’ve done it!) … then that’s the equivalent of root. No two ways about it.

Go through this forum and others, and look at how many new users have blasted something with a Live CD, as opposed to logging into KDE or Gnome as root. There’s no comparison.

This is a tempest in a teacup. I agree that one should never log in as root without doing so for a specific, single task. I also agree that a new user should be warned – solemnly – about doing so. I also agree that one should never, ever do anything Internet-related while logged into a GUI as root.

I was being a pedantic curmudgeon, primarily in response to Palladium’s assertion that one should “never” (his word) log in as root to a GUI. That word caught my eye and my eye responded via my equally-curmudgeonous fingers. Absolute statements usually cause that. :slight_smile:

Actually, I lump arguments like these with (as I said above) those from the die-hard Ubuntu-ites who insist that everything should be “sudo [single command]” instead of “su” and do a bunch of commands. They’re just as insistent about that as you and Palladium are about not logging into a GUI as root. It’s taken as an article of faith among them.

I note in closing (I’m leaving this, and you guys can have the last word; I certainly have more important things to do): none of you addressed several of the points that I raised – in particular, the fact that doing an “su” in a terminal, followed by a graphical command, could possibly cause problems as well. I don’t recall this ever happening under Opensuse, but I have hosed my /home/stephen/.ICEauthority, .xauthority and other config files under CentOS, simply because I forgot to add the “-” after “su” when I became root.

But as you note, to each his own. Personally, I think this is one of those things that the Linux community has just repeated at itself so often, it’s taken as a matter of doctrinal faith. I strayed from the orthodoxy, and I must be called An Heritick™. I shall go light candles and ponder my sin now. :slight_smile:

smpoole7 wrote:
> This is a tempest in a teacup. I agree that one should never log in as
> root without doing so for a specific, single task. I also agree that a
> new user should be warned – solemnly – about doing so. I also agree
> that one should never, ever do anything Internet-related while logged
> into a GUI as root.

we agree on a lot of that…

but, since there is no “specific, single task” requiring anyone
(especially not a new user) to log into KDE/etc as root, it should
not be recommended in any advice here to anyone (since the very next
thread reader might have a total of one hour Linux experience (but, 10
years operating as the “administrator” on another name brand system,
and too easily get the idea to just keep doing that)…

as mentioned: what you do on your machine is your business…i do not
care which “specific, single task” you find too difficult to perform
correctly…but, please (third? time i ask) do not recommend that here…

just to be clear, i have never participated in any discussion on the
good or bads of ubuntu’s use of sudo or not…and, my ‘religion’ on
this comes from folks with big iron experience in the '60s…

perhaps someday some smart hacker will finally ‘innovate’ a way to run
*nix all the time as the administrator, and then we too can sell some
anti-malware!!


palladium