I was wondering about lvm

I asked about the varios partition types but I failed to ask about lvm.
I’m a little blank on the whole subject of lvm.
1: Does my whole harddisk need to be lvm or can I have additional partitions on it?
2: Can I have multiple partitions in the lvm partition?
3: How well does Opensuse support lvm?
4: The benifits of useing lvm are?

  1. no
  2. yes I think
  3. Ok I guess I never used it
    • allows expansion of file systems by chaining LVM partitions together. ie if you have a huge database and find that you need more space you can just add a disk and chain the LVM’s together.
      • Allows complete encryption of all the directories with a single password
      • Down side it is a bit more complicated to maintain and setup.

On 2012-04-10 22:26, ballsystemlord wrote:
>
> I asked about the varios partition types but I failed to ask about lvm.

¿You asked? ¿Where? :-?
Ah, two months ago…

> I’m a little blank on the whole subject of lvm.
> 1: Does my whole harddisk need to be lvm or can I have additional
> partitions on it?

You can have several of both.

> 2: Can I have multiple partitions in the lvm partition?

Yes.

> 3: How well does Opensuse support lvm?

As well as any Linux!

> 4: The benifits of useing lvm are?

Resizing.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

Thanks! That helped

I am using an LVM at present. I have one partition set as an LVM partition. I also have other partitions, including partitions used for installing a different version of linux (currently testing 12.2M3 on those other partitions).

My LVM is divided into root, “/home” and swap.

The LVM does two things for me that I like:
(1) It uses only the one partition for root, “/home” and swap file systems;
(2) I have the LVM encrypted.

I have a separate “/boot” and the “initrd” there manages the decryption and LVM stuff during boot. I’m not sure, but I think you can have an LVM without a separate “/boot”, but an encrypted LVM does require a separate “/boot”.

I believe that this depends on the version of Grub being used. Grub(legacy) doesn’t know anything about LVM, so a separate /boot partition is required. I believe that Grub2 can handle LVM (but obviously not if it’s encrypted). That’s the way I’m running it on openSUSE 12.1.

Note that if you want to see any of the files with a different system (i.e. a “Live” CD), you have to ensure that lvm2 starts up before that system will find any partitions within the LVM partition.

ron