I want a linux only laptop

I want an opensuse only laptop (not dual boot) and I notice that people are having problems when it comes to installing over win 8.1.
First looked at a Lenova G505 and seems that there is an issue with that machine due to secure boot.
I am now looking at an HP 15-G000Si Series or an Acer E1 (with win 8.1 installed) which have all I need in terms of hardware
Does anyone have any pointers as what or what not to get ? or what sort of problems I might expect ?

When I look at Dell for such a machine (last year, and actually a Desktop), I found that it was cheaper to buy one with Windows. There was a sale on for the Windows boxes.

First looked at a Lenova G505 and seems that there is an issue with that machine due to secure boot.

You don’t really need secure-boot. I ended up buying a ThinkServer TS140 for desktop. Yes, it had problems with secure-boot, so I turned that off. After a recent BIOS update, it is doing fine with secure-boot. I don’t know if that applies to the machine you were looking at.

I am now looking at an HP 15-G000Si Series or an Acer E1 (with win 8.1 installed) which have all I need in terms of hardware

Based on what I have seen on this forum, people have had problems with UEFI on HP machine (it wants to always boot Windows). I think that doesn’t apply if you delete the Windows. I have not heard of any problems with Acer machines.

I don’t have specific knowledge of the particular models that you mention.

Thank you - I appreciate the feedback.

I bought a HP desktop p/c last year and it is a pain to configure using opensuse (nothing to do with opensuse but it is set to ignore any boot options you install and to start windows instead).

On Mon 09 Feb 2015 12:26:02 PM CST, nrickert wrote:

Alastairo;2694047 Wrote:
> I want an opensuse only laptop (not dual boot) and I notice that
> people are having problems when it comes to installing over win 8.1.
When I look at Dell for such a machine (last year, and actually a
Desktop), I found that it was cheaper to buy one with Windows. There
was a sale on for the Windows boxes.

> First looked at a Lenova G505 and seems that there is an issue with
> that machine due to secure boot.
You don’t really need secure-boot. I ended up buying a ThinkServer
TS140 for desktop. Yes, it had problems with secure-boot, so I turned
that off. After a recent BIOS update, it is doing fine with
secure-boot. I don’t know if that applies to the machine you were
looking at.

> I am now looking at an HP 15-G000Si Series or an Acer E1 (with win 8.1
> installed) which have all I need in terms of hardware

Based on what I have seen on this forum, people have had problems with
UEFI on HP machine (it wants to always boot Windows). I think that
doesn’t apply if you delete the Windows. I have not heard of any
problems with Acer machines.

I don’t have specific knowledge of the particular models that you
mention.

Hi
My two latest HP ProBooks (4440s and 455 G1) have the customized boot
option, just add \EFI\opensuse\shim.efi (or grubx64.efi), move to first
boot position and away you go…


Cheers Malcolm °¿° LFCS, SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12 GNOME 3.10.1 Kernel 3.12.36-38-default
If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
please show your appreciation and click on the star below… Thanks!

AFAIK HP releases all its BIOS upgrades packaged <only> for Windows.
Therefor, with an HP you may be forced to either forego future BIOS updates or extract the BIOS update from the package and try to install it in an alternative way… IMO a highly risky endeavor with likely few safety net options, the worst turning your hardware into an absolute dead doorstop.

I don’t know whether other manufacturers release their BIOS differently, you’ll need to check.

Otherwise…
<Most> of the hardware in HP machines are supported by Linux drivers, but beware the outlier, like the Broadcom 4352 in my HP Envy Touchsmart 17 which seems to be one of the last Broadcom wireless chips that remain unsupported completely (AFAIK).

TSU

hi,

two years ago bought an HP Pavilion g7 with win8 installed,

down loaded the dvd and installed openSUSE from it,

sysinfo-130127
settings after initial setup and downloading updates from repos

CPU Information
Processor (CPU):   	AMD A8-4500M APU with Radeon(tm) HD Graphics 
  Speed:  		1,900.00 MHz
  Cores:  		4
  Memory Information
Total memory (RAM):  	3.4 GiB
  Free memory:  	2.5 GiB (+ 415.5 MiB Caches)
  Free swap:  		2.0 GiB
Disk Information
  Device	Filesystem	Used		Total space	Available space
  HOME  	ext4  		23.7 GiB	361.3 GiB  	337.6 GiB
  primary  	vfat  						  2.0 GiB
  SUS_ROOT  	ext4  		11.4 GiB	 99.8 GiB  	 88.4 GiB
OS Information
OS:  			Linux 3.4.6-2.10-desktop x86_64
  Current user:  	michael@linux.site
  System:  		openSUSE 12.2 (x86_64)
  KDE:  		4.9.5 "release 3"

regularly updated and now on openSUSE 20150225-Tumbleweed without problems

laptop chosen because of low price and 4-core Processor,
hated the look of win8 so it was overwritten

secure boot has to be switched off if non-standard kernel used
(meaning not one sourced from by openSUSE repos)

cheers

Hi
No, not at all when using UEFI, you can either create a USB device or use the efi partition for BIOS upgrades. There is also a BIOS setting on the 455 to check if your going to perform it and backup the existing BIOS.

Unpacking the exe file is easy with cabextract, nothing special.

Again, if you get a shonky upgrade, with a HP, you can insert the BIOS USB, remove the battery, press win+B, plug in the power, press the power button, when caps lock key starts to flash, release win+B and it will search the attached USB device and roll back…

I have had to recover one upgrade (and that was done within windows!) using a USB device. But from what I have read, there have been some issues with BIOS upgrades on the DV range of HP’s…

I have successfully installed OpenSUSE 13.2 on my Lenovo G580 without too many issues. If you install by DVD media it should work just fine. Do yourself a favor and find a Linux User Group in your area, see if they can mentor you with the most dependable process.

On Mon, 09 Feb 2015 11:56:02 +0000, Alastairo wrote:

> I want an opensuse only laptop (not dual boot) and I notice that people
> are having problems when it comes to installing over win 8.1.
> First looked at a Lenova G505 and seems that there is an issue with that
> machine due to secure boot.
> I am now looking at an HP 15-G000Si Series or an Acer E1 (with win 8.1
> installed) which have all I need in terms of hardware Does anyone have
> any pointers as what or what not to get ? or what sort of problems I
> might expect ?

Disable secure boot, install openSUSE. Done. :slight_smile:

I’ve got a desktop that came with Windows 8.1 installed with secure boot
installed; disabled secure boot, installed openSUSE, and actually, Win
8.1 doesn’t care that secure boot is disabled, either (I do occasionally
dual boot for the occasional game that runs better on Windows natively).

Jim


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

I have a NV570P09u Gateway laptop. Installation was painless, but less then 6 months later the HDs PCB board failed. Other then that though it seems a good alround machine. It has num keys (as oppossed to have to hit an “fn” or simmilar key to enter them), it’s graphical preformace is decent and it’s cpu is fast enough for my liking. It’s not a 409 (fyi, car engine model), in other words.

Secure boot is only used if turned on if turned off it does not matter. With it turned off you can install a OS with the secure boot flag set. What you can’t do is if it is on any os booting must have the proper credentials. In all honesty it does not do too much I guess it would keep bad software from changing the boot chain maybe. In any case if it is off nothing cares about it.

I have done several installations on various Toshiba laptops and have never had a problem.

Bart

Just a word of advice, I found that each and every laptop had some sort of incompatibilities with most linux distributions. I am yet to bump into one with OpenSUSE on my Lenovo T410S. There is also an on-going bug regarding network roaming issue that I am yet to resolve, but this is linux-kernel related as far as I’ve read and experienced, since it applies to all distributions I’ve tried.

With my HP1000 mini, I didn’t have the roaming isue but with my Lenovo, it gets very annoying.

When I was shopping for my “linux laptop” (ended up being Lenovo T410S), I was originally looking for a brand-new laptop, After weeks of searching, I’ve made a deal to buy this laptop for $330 used. I am finding that the Lenovo T-series are great and I can only afford second-hand ones which are phased out by local businesses (Price tag on them brand new is in 4 digits). Just look for a “decent” laptop, just do know that Linux doesn’t have the same drivers/support as Windows.

Multitude of installs on multitude of Acers.

Several installs on several Lenovos.

Several installs on several Toshibas.

No problems on any of the above.:wink:

Using Acer V3 - 571G. Have no problem on it.
Had some minor glitch on Lenovo though.
I’m multi-booting and have no problem with secure boot. Just add the keys to mokmanager

A Linux only Laptop?

That’s what I wanted as well, and I got it for about 300 Euros (or less than 300 USD) about a month ago.

It’s an Acer Aspire-E5-571-31-KM which was announced as ‘No OS’, although it had this chinese Linpus-Linux pre-installed, which I deleted.

OpenSUSE 13.2 installed from the 64bit installer DVD (this laptop still has a DVD drive) in ‘secure boot mode’ without any problem!

And openSUSE 13.2 runs on it almost perfectly, fast and smooth, except for one problem, that the mouse pad is deactivated after the laptop is shut (sending it to some sleep state).

It has an Intel Core i3-4005U Prozessor @ 1,7 GHz, 4 GB of RAM, a HDD of 500 GB, and an SSD cache of 8GB, which seems to speed up things considerably, even under openSUSE 13.2 (no windows present).

It feels faster than my Desktop PC with a Core i5-2500 (which doesn’t have a SSD).

OK, the display of that notebook only has 1366x768 pixels, but for 300 Euros/Dollars that should be OK.