I tried it but re-installed 11.0 in the end :-(

I think I gave it a good go.

Persisted with Dolphin for nearly a week before giving up and
going back to Konqueror as preferred file manager. Imagine my
disappointment when the KDE4 version of Konqueror was even more
difficult to use than Dolphin. :frowning:

A note for the Konqueror developers: A simple way of selecting
just one file in the detail list would be nice. Refer to
behaviour of KDE3 version of Konqueror.

Thankfully the KDE3 version of Konqueror had been installed by
default (Still trying to figure that one out!) so was able to
get some stuff done without launching an unwanted application at
every click of the mouse button.

Don’t know what has been done to K3b, but it’s new behaviour is
far too esoteric/inconsistent/bizarre/frustrating for me to
figure out. After the original install, there were no optical
disc writing devices in the computer at all. After 15min
searching the openSuSE fora the “answer” was to add the user
account to the cdrom group, log out, and log back in again.
Having done so, one of the two DVD writers had now magically
returned to the computer. Apparently, the other one was now a
CD-ROM. :frowning:

Managed to burn a few discs, get a few other things done, and was
feeling good that some progress had been made. Was now getting
late, time to log out, shut down the computer and go to bed.

Well that was the last time a DVD was written under SuSE 11.1.
Over the next few days of boots, reboots, logouts, logins, and
group membership changes the DVD writers appeared disappeared
and changed from CD-ROM to CD-RW to DVD-ROM to DVD-RW and back
again, but at no stage since the first day did K3b acknowledge
that writable media had been put into either drive.

The adventures with VMware Workstation were also something of a
curiosity. Install using the rpm seemed to work, but
Workstation wouldn’t run. :frowning: Not even Player would run.
Uninstalled okay and re-installed using the ‘bundle’. That also
seemed to work. This time was able to start Workstation and
enter the serial number. Any attempt to start a VM was met with
a number of messages about vmmon etc. not being loaded and/or
available.

Another foray onto the openSuSE fora produced a couple of
possibilities. Unfortunately none made squat difference.

Need to get something done here. Don’t have time left to putz
around trying to get things working. Time to go back to SuSE
11.0!

Well, okay here I am, back on SuSE 11.0 as of yesterday arvo.

Konqueror works in a reasonable, logical, and intuitive manner.
K3b is predictable, recognises both DVD-RW, and acknowledges
writable media when put in. Even manages to write discs without
error. :slight_smile:

As for VMware Workstation … it just works! No hassle, no
drama, no questions, no glitches. It just works! :slight_smile:

Overall, my impression of openSuSE with KDE4 is similar to that
of Microsoft Windows: inconsistent, unintuitive, illogical,
inflexible, and difficult to get anything done. :frowning:

Upon the arrival of openSuSE 11.2, think I’ll be a little more
circumspect. Suspect, I’ll try it out in a VM before committing
hardware to it. :-\

IMHO, for openSUSE-11.2 you should do what you did not do for openSUSE-11.1, which is to wait 2 months after the release date, and then install it. During those 2 months a number of things that may have slipped through the alpha/beta/RC test process, or things that may have been introduced at the last minute after the RC release (but before the GM release, such as the permissions problem with k3b in 11.1) will have been solved.

Not participating in the development, then jumping in days after a release, and drawing conclusions, especially when there was a long vacation period immediately after the release (and not providing time for fixes), is IMHO not the way to proceed if one wishes a stable release of an operating system. This is especially true of the operation system does not have the massive revenue base, and does not have a massive base of testers, in comparison to the Windows operating system that you decided to compare it to.

Since this is a soapbox, then IMHO if you jump in to 11.2 the same way as you did with 11.1, you will most likely be equally dissatisfied.

That was not the complete answer. … There are many threads on this where more guidance was provided.

I suspect if one waits until a couple months after the 18-Dec release date (and possibly less time) there will be a downloadable update addressing the problems. Until then, to address this bug in openSUSE-11.1 (which I believe appeared/was-introduced only after the RC1 release) messing up permissions for cd/dvd drives, one work around is to add your regular user to BOTH group “disk” and group “cdrom”.

This can be done by:

YAST >> Security and Users >> User Management >> “select your user” >> Edit >> Details >> Groups >> check “cdrom” and “disk” and then click on “ACCEPT”. Don’t forget after exiting YaST, you need to restart.

If that does not work, there are more suggestions here to work around this temporary problem Solved : K3b Problem with Normal User on openSUSE 11.1 | Spirit of Change

VMwares vmmon issue is related to the 2.6.27 kernel - patches are already available (and this you could’ve found out with Google in less than 10 seconds - including the fix - it’s the same for every distribution under the sun, the issue lies with the outdated functions used by the vmmon).

11.1 also ships with KDE 3.5 so “11.1 is just KDE4” is plain wrong.

> VMwares vmmon issue is related to the 2.6.27 kernel - patches are
> already available (and this you could’ve found out with Google in less
> than 10 seconds - including the fix - it’s the same for every
> distribution under the sun, the issue lies with the outdated functions
> used by the vmmon).

This is true, but I could not make the update work.
I tried everything I could find for two days and I am well versed
in VMware and it’s lagging kernel support. Ultimately I just
installed VMware server 2, which is buggier but installs on 11.1 with
no hacks or tricks. I am watching for a supported release in the 1.x series
but I doubt one will be forthcoming. So it’s onward and upward.
I haven’t had a bad experience with 11.1 yet, there are some niggles but
I’m just waiting for the patches.

> IMHO, for openSUSE-11.2 you should do what you did not do for
> openSUSE-11.1, which is to wait 2 months after the release date, and
> then install it. During those 2 months a number of things that may have
> slipped through the alpha/beta/RC test process, or things that may have
> been introduced at the last minute after the RC release (but before the
> GM release, such as the permissions problem with k3b in 11.1) will have
> been solved.

Agree with your opinion. Lets all face it: Lately EVERY new release
is just another open beta for SUSE Enterprise Level Desktop/Server.

And, I guess after two or three months of PAIN and frustration in the
openSUSE community SLED 11.0 will be released. (Or, at the very least
SLED 10 will receive stable and usable updates.)

SuSE used to be (say back with 9.x) stable and usable when released.
And, when new enhancements were available they would be released in
the next dot-numbered release, ALSO stable and usable. No more.

I wonder why it changed? Profit motivation and a super-hype six month
deliver cycle, probably.

Ymmv

You’re being overly hard on the release.

Apart from the PulseAudio issues and issues created by the new kernel (which all distributions have) 11.1 has been quite solid on the server end.

oldcpu wrote:

>
>> Glibik;1924370 Wrote:
>> I think I gave it a good go.
> IMHO, for openSUSE-11.2 you should do what you did not do for
> openSUSE-11.1, which is to wait 2 months after the release
> date, and then install it. During those 2 months a number of
> things that may have slipped through the alpha/beta/RC test
> process, or things that may have been introduced at the last
> minute after the RC release (but before the GM release, such as
> the permissions problem with k3b in 11.1) will have been
> solved.

Agree completely with your sentiment. I normally don’t even look
at X.0 software releases.

I was initially rather dubious about installing 11.0 at all.
When considering the time between 10.3 and 11.0, in addition to
how solid and stable 10.3 had been, I decided to go for it and
wasn’t disappointed. So when 11.1 arrived, I was confident that
it would be at least as good as 11.0.

Am now thinking 11.0 should have been 10.4, and 11.1 should have
been 11.0. :frowning:

>
> … and does not have a massive base of
> testers, in comparison to the Windows operating system that you
> decided to compare it to.

Only mentioned Microsoft Windows to emphasise my disappointment
with KDE4; inconsistent, unintuitive, illogical, inflexible.

I found that some issues (such as time/ntp, vsftp, and a few other things) were costing me excessive time. I dumped 11.1, and reinstalled with gnome. I have had almost NO issues whatsoever and everything is running solid.

I like KDE and actually prefer it, but it still is not where I need it to be.

I have no idea why, but simple things like installing PHP Eclipse, took three tries… As well as a couple of other issues, where the installer reported success, but had actually failed.

Default java version causes issues with eclipse, installing java-devel 1.7 solved it for me.

The SuSE version numbers have always been essentially meaningless. It is irritating but I’m afraid true. The Major number version just goes up, every now and again to keep roughly in step (ahead of) other distros.

oldcpu is spot on, when advising “patience” with new releases, if tracking fixes & using work rounds is too inconvenient. Personally even with commercially supported OSes, it is wise to test drive in spare partitions, that you set aside for the purpose (plan for future change).

Actually I don’t think things “slip through” the test process, from looking at bug reports and following mail list, the problem is not testing not finding issues. It is the time for fixes and usability enhancements, which constrain the release.

There’s also an incentive due to the “freeze” post-release which causes developments to be included even if known broken, simply because they can’t be added later when they’re really ready.

Same for me…

I did go through all the steps to get a working Compiz, but Evolution resisting to memorize my passwords finally made me give up.

Even worse, on my Laptop it did not even install. I got a system freeze, where it claimed to detect my (wired) network chip (Broadcom, not that much exotic!).

Overall 11.1 feels quite buggy and disappointing.

I’m delighted with 11.1, KDE 3.5.10. The new kernel works very well and all of my hardware worked out of the box. I tried KDE 4.1 but can’t really get used to it. It’s also slow. Might try it again when 4.2 is out. Nvidia just released new drivers which might help as well. The k3b issue is easily solved and I didn’t even have to look it up :slight_smile:

All in all, it’s good. I suppose 11.0 with the new kernel would have been just as good but this release is fine for me! :slight_smile: