How to install on hard disk (as dual OS) using USB and no USB boot option in BIOS?

Hey everyone, first post here so please bear with me! I’ve a descent understanding of computers but am completely new to Linux.

Here’s what I have (and don’t) -
HP AMD Athlon, 2.10 GHz, 512 MB RAM, roughly 160 GB
Windows XP Professional, Version 2002, SP 3 on the C Drive
BIOS Revision 3.15 06/06/05 (no update available)
No floppy drive installed
No cd drive installed
Several USB ports that BIOS does not support booting from
D Drive that is empty waiting for OpenSUSE

Under Windows XP in the C Drive, I’ve downloaded PLoP boot manager to force the USB boot. I’ve tried about a thousand things and I get a different error message at different times from each attempt. I’ve got all of those documented, and I imagine I’ll need to post them. I’m just not doing it quite yet as sometimes I give too much information and I really feel that I’m being an idiot here, missing something simple.

I’d like to install openSUSE onto the D Drive, using the USB and PLoP to boot it. I’ve downloaded openSUSE’s torrents for all iso’s (Net, DVD and LiveKDE). In order to get those files onto the USB, I first format to FAT32. I’ve tried UNetBootIn, LiLi, and mounting the iso on Daemon Tools and then copy-paste into the hard drive. None of these work and they all give different errors.

Is this even possible, am I wasting my time? This is getting incredibly frustrating as I’ve been at it for nearly a week. Any help at all, suggestions, anything would be greatly appreciated!

  • Frustrated.

Sounds very ‘Heath Robinson’ to me.
Never heard of PLoP before

What exactly is your aim.

Since I do not know plop (I looked it up with google but cannot comment on
it) and you system does not support usb boot I would try to get a cd drive
from somewhere (you can unplug it when you installed linux and give it back
to the owner) to boot a proper installation cd/dvd.
As you said you already tried a week to make the usb boot available with
tricks you will be most likely without luck otherwise.


openSUSE 11.2 64 bit | Intel Core2 Quad Q8300@2.50GHz | Gnome 2.28 | GeForce
9600 GT | 4GB Ram
openSUSE 11.3 64 bit | Intel Core2 Duo T9300@2.50GHz | Gnome 2.30 | Quadro
FX 3600M | 4GB Ram

Just one thought, I read your attempts for a bootable stick again, did you
try to create an usb stick as described here?

http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Live_USB_stick

and then try to use plop to boot it.


openSUSE 11.2 64 bit | Intel Core2 Quad Q8300@2.50GHz | Gnome 2.28 | GeForce
9600 GT | 4GB Ram
openSUSE 11.3 64 bit | Intel Core2 Duo T9300@2.50GHz | Gnome 2.30 | Quadro
FX 3600M | 4GB Ram

On 2010-08-30 05:06, InkSpilled wrote:
>
> Hey everyone, first post here so please bear with me! I’ve a descent
> understanding of computers but am completely new to Linux.
>
> Here’s what I have (and don’t) -
> HP AMD Athlon, 2.10 GHz, 512 MB RAM, roughly 160 GB
> Windows XP Professional, Version 2002, SP 3 on the C Drive
> BIOS Revision 3.15 06/06/05 (no update available)
> No floppy drive installed
> No cd drive installed
> Several USB ports that BIOS does not support booting from
> D Drive that is empty waiting for OpenSUSE

http://old-en.opensuse.org/Installation

Advanced installation options

→ * Live USB stick – How to create a bootable live USB drive, which can be used to install openSUSE

  • Network installation – Installing from remote repositories
  • Remote installation – Installing remotely in a Local network
  • PXE boot installation – Installation from network using Pre-Execution Environment
    → * Installation without CD – Installation without CDs or DVDs
    → * Installation using images – Installation using ISO images
  • Install Another Distribution
    → * Live Hard Disk Install – How to run a Live CD from a hard disk
    → * Instlux – Installation from Windows without configuring the BIOS
  • Installation on VMWare Workstation for Windows – Installation on a virtual machine with .iso
    images
  • How to migrate to a new openSUSE version

Hope some of it might help you :-?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” GM (Elessar))

Oh, I also forgot to add - the usb is a SanDisk Cruzer, micro 8gb.

Caf - A Heath Robinson indeed. I will try any other boot managers able to force usb boot if anyone can find them. PLoP is just the only one I’ve found. My aim is to install openSUSE on Drive D.

Martin - I don’t know anyone else with a desktop. I could go out and buy one, and may end up doing so at the end of September if it comes to it. Any suggestions on alternatives to PLoP? I need to force that usb boot.
I’ve tried that link, LiveUSB Stick, but I can’t even get past step 2. The link to download SUSE Studio ImageWriter for Microsoft Windows from ftp://ftp.berlios.de/pub/kiwi/ImageWriter.exe just loads forever and nothing happens. I can’t find another download on Google at all… which is odd I think.

Carlos - I’ve thought about installing just Linux or some other main distribution, and then getting openSUSe from within that OS. I’m afraid that the force-usb-boot-managers I’ve come across are all on the Windows platform.
What is a Network installation, exactly? What is a Remote installation? I don’t understand the terminology in the definitions.

On 2010-08-31 02:06, InkSpilled wrote:

> Carlos - I’ve thought about installing just Linux or some other
> main distribution, and then getting openSUSe from within that OS. I’m
> afraid that the force-usb-boot-managers I’ve come across are all on the
> Windows platform.
> What is a Network installation, exactly? What is a Remote installation?
> I don’t understand the terminology in the definitions.

It is all explained somewhere in the wiki.

A network install is one in which you use a small boot CD, and bring the packages over the network.

A remote installation is one done to a computer to which you don’t have physical access, ie, done
remotely.

Those are not the ones I marked for you.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” GM (Elessar))

Well … is a decent mainboard, which can boot from USB, not worth a week of work ?
Nevermind.

Okay. The only one I can figure out how to do is using Instlux. I’m only able to find downloads for Instlux 4.0 and openSUSE 10.2. When I boot into the OpenSUSE 10.2 option, it allows me to choose the following flows.

Hard Disk - hard disk partition (should this be where the installer is coming from, which is drive C, or where I want to install openSUSE, which is drive D?) - source directory.
It automatically enters /opensuse/distribution/10.2/repo/oss as the source directory, which gives me the error “Cannot find the image. Check the directory specification.” Is that supposed to read the path to my DVD iso, “C:/opensuse/openSUSE-11.3-DVD-i586.iso” just like that?

The other option is choosing network as the source medium. Then it gives the options FTP, HTTP and NFS. Which should I choose and what is the address I need to enter?

If you copy the contents of the dvd to usb and look in the root of the dvd you will find the windows executable files openSUSE11_X_LOCAL.exe or _NET.exe.
These will install a boot menu together with bootloader which allows you to install from the usb on next boot.
If you don’t want to download the complete dvd, download the contents of the boot directory and the net file will allow a network install.
It works well - I used it to install to my netbook.

Hi!

I’m not new to computers nor linux, but I have something clear, that there is no standard in computer standards. I explain myself better, not all BIOS boot usb equal, and not all usb-boot programs works the same way, etc. After a lot of fightings with two computers (one with an asus A7N8X-X motherboard and a MSI Wind clone without cd-rom) I finally ended buying an usb cd-writer for less than 60€ ( I found one at 29€ 1 week later).

An example for this situation was, I was able to install opensuse on my netbook and not in the desktop computer with the same usb drive.

I would recommend you this option because probably you will install a OS more than one time, it’s not very expensive and you can use it on another machine. I know that usb pendrives are easy to carry & faster, but I prefer wasting my time installing and working with my linux than trying to understand why the usb pendrive installation failed.

Hope this helps at least just a little…

On 2010-09-01 09:06, InkSpilled wrote:

> The other option is choosing network as the source medium. Then it
> gives the options FTP, HTTP and NFS. Which should I choose and what is
> the address I need to enter?

The IP address of a computer having the 10.2 oss and non-oss repositories - not the name - be it
internet or local network. If it is hhtp or whatever, ask the administrator of that server, ie, look
for yourself.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” GM (Elessar))

On 2010-08-30, InkSpilled <InkSpilled@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

> I’d like to install openSUSE onto the D Drive, using the USB and PLoP
> to boot it. I’ve downloaded openSUSE’s torrents for all iso’s (Net, DVD
> and LiveKDE). In order to get those files onto the USB, I first format
> to FAT32. I’ve tried UNetBootIn, LiLi, and mounting the iso on Daemon
> Tools and then copy-paste into the hard drive. None of these work and
> they all give different errors.
>
> Is this even possible, am I wasting my time? This is getting incredibly
> frustrating as I’ve been at it for nearly a week. Any help at all,
> suggestions, anything would be greatly appreciated!

As it has been suggested allready, plug a CD or DVD drive in, if only
temporarily. Another possibility is to find an external DVD drive to boot
from.

Or, give the D drive to someone else, to put Linux on.


When in doubt, use brute force.
– Ken Thompson

Yup, I am an idiot. I’m running openSUSE now. Thank you to everyone for responding! Should anyone else have the same trouble, I’ll post how I did it, the way I needed it explained.

When installing openSUSE 11.3 (other distros and versions also presumably applicable) using UNetBootin from existing Windows XP (again, other versions presumably also applicable), there are a few steps not explained anywhere else that I’ve found. If you keep getting various error messages such as “CD number 1 not found,” “no repositories found” and “cannot find file” no matter what different paths you try, you may find your answers here. This is a how-to for installing a linux distro on your hard drive from your hard drive, to replace or add to the running Windows OS, without the use of a usb, cd or dvd, using UNetBootin. *** Note -* ISO images downloaded as torrents are much more reliable than those downloaded through your web browser!

1. Open UNetBootin
1a - If you do not have an ISO downloaded onto your hard drive, choose Distribution->Select Distribution->Select Version
1b - If you do have an ISO downloaded onto your hard drive, choose Disk Image->ISO->… to Browse for the ISO
1c - Use this option if you already have created the partition that you would like to install openSUSE on, as a dual OS in addition to Windows. Let’s say that partition is drive D:/. Do the following drive D:/. Download an ISO, install Daemon Tools (or another drive emulator), mount the ISO on the drive emulator, open the emulated drive, copy the initrd and linux kernel to D:/, install UNetBootin, open UNetBootin. Choose Custom->Kernel->… and Browse to select the kernel file you copied previously, then Initrd->… and Browse to select the initrd file you copied previously.
2. Type->Hard Disk, Drive->Select the drive that you are running UNetBootin from
and have downloaded the ISO to. If the drive does not show up, feel free to ask me as I had the same problem. Click OK and let UNetBootin do its thing. Reboot when prompted.
3. Select UNetBootin from the boot options that will automatically appear. Select UNetBootin again. If you get a no-cd drive error, ignore it. Start the installation, choose Network, HTTP. Allow DHCP to automatically configure if prompted. The source will be “http://download.opensuse.org/” followed by the directory “distribution/11.3/repo/oss/.” Follow on-screen directions after that. You will be given options to partition - be sure to do so carefully. I would suggest editing the setup to check that the options selected are really what you want. I left the install going overnight once it started installing. *** Note -* If this does not work for you, try the following - Reboot, choose UNetBootin on the boot menu, and try to find a menu that looks like this →
“UNetBootin
linux”
followed by a few other options on other lines. Try choosing linux and then continuing with the HTTP network install.

Any questions, respond to this here or email/message me. I hope this helps someone out as it would have helped me.