How to free diskspace?

Hi!
My root-partition(/) is almost full, but i cant find out what to delete. Is there a way to find out what to delete?
I miss something like CCleaner for Windows :wink:

But an alternativ is to resize partition since i have good free space on /home, but i can’t resize without unmounting partition and i don’t dare to experiment.

I need advice!

ronnys wrote:
> My root-partition(/) is almost full, but i cant find out what to
> delete. Is there a way to find out what to delete?

kdirstat can display large files and directories as rectangles of
corresponding sizes. You will find temporary files in /tmp and /var/tmp.
You can also remove unused programs. You can display a list of packages
sorted by installed size in YaST / Software / Software management,
installation summary view, [x] installed packages checked. Click “size”
column to sort. To do this in shell, run this command:
rpm -qa --qf="%{SIZE} %{NAME}
" | sort -g

> But an alternativ is to resize partition since i have good free space
> on /home, but i can’t resize without unmounting partition and i don’t
> dare to experiment.

You can resize partitions from an openSUSE Live CD, an openSUSE rescue
system (DVD, mini netinstall ISO, grub boot to install system, floppies)
Ext3 file systems can be enlarged while mounted.

Kind regards,
Andreas Stieger

ronnys wrote:

> :wink:

If you have an unused partition, you could format it and move /opt (or /usr
or /tmp or /var) onto it …

Alan

No i cannot!
I’ve of course used all diskspace and partition like this:

  • / total:20GB used:18.1GB free:1,9GB (ext3)
  • /swap 2GB
  • /home “The rest” with allot free space (ext3)

Now i have uninstalled apps that did take space and i dindt use. I have deletet files in /tmp and manage to get 1GB extra free.

I would like to decrease size og /home and increase /
But i cant decrease /home because it says its in use and i cant umount it eighter. I guess i have to boot up in init 3 and then use som cli-command to resize /home.
What command?

Your best friend to find out the size of various folders on your hard disk is “du”, see “man du” for more information.

18GB for an openSUSE installation with its own /home is not normal, there is something “fat” hidden somewhere, use du to find out what’s wrong here.

Hi Alan,

I had the same problem. I was able to successfully move some mount points (swap, /tmp, and /home) onto a second physical disk. But I ran into problems trying to resize /. It seems partions can be easily resized if the unallocated space is after the partition of interest.

If the unallocated space is before the desired partition, the problem is tougher. See Extend / into Unpartioned Space - openSUSE Forums. My ultimate solution was to reinstall with a bigger drive (the installation was rather fresh).

Jeff

> - / total:20GB used:18.1GB free:1,9GB (ext3)

i agree with the other posters that this is an unusual situation that
you need to solve (why is it so large…i guess you have HUGE logs)

> I would like to decrease size og /home and increase /
> But i cant decrease /home because it says its in use and i cant umount
> it eighter. I guess i have to boot up in init 3 and then use som
> cli-command to resize /home.

no, you can do all in a GUI if you boot from a Live CD as “Andreas
Stieger” suggested…

[hint when booting from a Live CD the hard drive’s partitions are not
mounted, BUT the partitioner accessible from YaST will run in memory
and do all you need----BUT, making a larger / just addresses the
symptom, not the cause…]


Andy Sipowicz

Hi!
Thanks for helping! Since you tell me that this was not normal, then i start to look more in detail. It was the trashcan for root-user that hold an old virtual disk from Virtualbox that was 10GB.
Now im down to 8GB usage of 20GB.

Tanx!

> Tanx!

you are welcome, but there should NEVER be anything in root’s trashcan…

there is absolutely NO reason for root to ever have a trash can…

because no one should EVER log into KDE/GNOME/Xfce/etc/etc as
root…NEVER EVER…

to perform administrator duties as root, NEVER log into KDE/etc as
root, instead always log in as a normal user and then become root in
the ways noted in: http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Login_as_root


Andy Sipowicz

If you wanted to see what large files are on your system you could use this.

become root
find / -size +1000000 -print

Or change the size to whatever you want to look for.