How to change my IP adress

I’ve tried some ways in the past with Linux, but none gave me results. On Windows I’d do:

ipconfig (to see what my IP is)
ipconfig/release
change IP on the adapter settings to 111.111.111.111; DNS 255.0.0.0.0
disable the connection
change IP to automatic
enable connection
ipconfig/renew

When using ‘ifup’

Use Yast - Network Devices - Network Settings - Overview.
Select the device, click Edit
In the Address tab you can set the IP you want by making it a static one.
Back in the main screen, you need to set the DNS’s and the default gateway (i.e. your router’s IP).

When using Networkmanager:

Use the tool that comes with your desktop, edit the connection, and change the DHCP settings to manual. Enter the desired values, reconnect and you should be alright.

I don’t have a router, so can I skip that step?

You mean your system is in a LAN without any connection to outside (e.g. to the Internet)?

Well I guess we call different names then. Here a router is THIS, and THIS is what connects my PC, which is called modem here.

if you don’t have a router then you are connecting directly to your modem provided by the internet provider(THIS).
What you used to do in Windows is to release your current IP from the DHCP at your internet provider(ipconfig /release) and get a new one(ipconfig /renew), which could make you end up with the same IP you just release, after all it’s a pool of addresses from where you get yours.
Why do you need to release it? I don’t know, but to be able to connect from outside you need to know this IP.
If you have multiple computers in your home as I’m sure you have form another post i don’t understand how you tried to connect between them without a router? but that was another thread.
So follow knurpht advice to do this and go in YAST and change from Network to have it via ifup.
Then in a terminal type /sbin/ifconfig which will tell you the network interfaces on your machine(can be multiple) and the one with an IP is the one in use.
/sbin/ifdown eth0 - will release the ip address,
/sbin/ifup eth0 - will get you a new ip address(or same).
run agian /sbin/ifconfig will tell you the current ip.
be sure to change eth0 to the one you are using, otherwise there is no effect.

Internet companies tend to loot the consumer sometimes. I was having Traffic Shaping, from 10Mbit to 1Mbit from 12PM to 12AM, then I alerted them for a law suit and everything got back to normal, they even cut the bill in half =P

BUT, ANATEL (Nacional Telecomunications Agency) said “Internet providers only have to provide 10% of the contract”, so if you stumble on a IP adress that is designed to provide low speeds you’re in trouble unless you change it. And it’s my case right now, I’m supposed to download at 1.300KB/s on Steam, and I’m only doing at 350-500.

EDIT: Only my computer uses this connection.

Technically you would need to use the same steps in Yast. Never heard of anything like this, completely new to me. If I manually change the external IP of my router (which it gets through the modem) there’s no nothing no internet anymore.

I’ll try it with a LiveCD and post the results later.

Not sure why you need a LiveCD. You can simply disconnect the modem, power it off and then power it on and see if the IP changed.

If you’re using Network Manager and KDE (not sure how similar the steps might be in Gnome),

Click on the Network Manager Applet in the right end of the Default Panel (which also includes the Application Launcher button).
Network Manager should pop up and in the bottom left corner should be checkboxes for whatever network connections are available, typically “Enable Networking” “Enable Wireless” and something perhaps something else.
Click the appropriate checkbox which will <un-check> the box, thereby disabling all networking, wireless networking or whatever else you may want to modify.
If you simply want to refresh your IP address (corresponds to the Windows command ipconfig /renew), then click the box again to enable. Otherwise, if you need to change your MAC address because you’re not getting a different IP address, do the following:
Click the “Manage Connections” button which should launch the main Network Manager applet.
Find the particular network connection you want to modify (eg if WiFi then you would look in the Wireless tab, Wired for wired, etc)
Select the connection you want to modify, click the Edit button
Modify the Cloned MAC Address, then save your settings.
Follow the above instructions to check the box to re-enable your networking.

HTH,
TSU

I was testing a game for Valve on Ubuntu, but I already installed openSUSE again.

Powering the modem off and then on again would never change the IP adress, sometimes if it is powered off over 1 hour it still is the same IP.

Then try the other solution which was provided via the terminal. if you don’t know how to I will create4 some print screens for you.

Please.

I tried:

  • Changing my IP
  • Disabling connection
  • IP back to automatic
  • Enabling connection

All other steps can’t be reproduced because I’m on XFCE, so I have YasT - Network Manager; and then I can change the IP and enable/disable the connection.

I guess I’d need the help of the Terminal, something like "# ifconfig eth0 down", then some other commands (sorry, never did so on Linux. Tried once with Ubuntu with Terminal, but nothing does the change)

I haven’t looked but Network Manager is a Gnome project that has become almost universal for all Desktops (almost, but not all!). It has nothing to do with YAST.

If you have Network Manager installed, have you followed my instructions?

TSU

Yes but they didn’t work. I have “NetWork Settings”, I can disable the connection there, but I didn’t find any option allowing me to change the Mac.

Just “ipconfig/renew” wouldn’t refresh my IP, neither enabling/disabling my connection, not even changing the MacAdress would change =P

On 2013-02-24 11:06, amarildojr wrote:

> Yes but they didn’t work. I have “NetWork Settings”, I can disable the
> connection there, but I didn’t find any option allowing me to change the
> Mac.
>
> Just “ipconfig/renew” wouldn’t refresh my IP, neither
> enabling/disabling my connection, not even changing the MacAdress would
> change =P

I’m a bit lost on this thread. You want to change your external,
Internet address? The MAC you have to change is the MAC you present to
your provider, on the external modem or router or however you call it.
And on some ISP (cable) if you change that you loose service instantly,
you are not recognized. So beware.

You have to google on how to change your IP with the particular ISP you
have contracted. Some will not allow it, intentionally.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

Click the “Manage Connections” button which should launch the main Network Manager applet. Find the particular network connection you want to modify (eg if WiFi then you would look in the Wireless tab, Wired for wired, etc) Select the connection you want to modify, click the Edit button

Did you click that button? Changing the MAC address is in a different window.

As Carlos mentions, there are rare situations where the MAC address should not be changed, typically those situations where the ISP assigns you a public address (and even then not often). By changing the MAC address, you intentionally look like a different machine to DHCP thereby forcing giving you a different address than before.

TSU

On 2013-02-24 17:46, tsu2 wrote:
> As Carlos mentions, there are rare situations where the MAC address
> should not be changed, typically those situations where the ISP assigns
> you a public address (and even then not often). By changing the MAC
> address, you intentionally look like a different machine to DHCP thereby
> forcing giving you a different address than before.

The cable provider here locks our contract to a fixed MAC. You change
the MAC, and you get no connection. It is probably a breach of the terms
of contract.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 12.1 x86_64 “Asparagus” at Telcontar)

here is how to change it to ifup
SUSE Paste
open a terminal and type su to get into admin mode(be very carefully what you type in here as it can destroy your OS if a command is executed). These commands are safe to be executed. And then at the end type
exit
to get out of the admin mode.
the ifconfig is telling you what interfaces your computer is using. The one with an IP address is the one in use. Usually the direct connection is eth0 and the wireless can be eth1 or wlan1 or in other ways.

in the network settings the Overview tab is telling you the same but there is a description of the interface(please note of it). The steps bellow should release your IP address and then would get eventually another one from the pool, but not 100%. In my screenshots the router provides the same functionality, but I assigned it a static address for an easier connections between my computers in my network.
SUSE Paste

sorry for late reply I had some other issues to resolve. Let us know the results. Print screens you can do with a tool called ksnapshot and to add images use SUSE Paste and add the link to it.