Hot laptop: I think fan is not working : Opensuse 12.2

hello friends,

i have dell n5010 with ati radeon graphics.

I recently upgraded my laptop and now i have opensuse 12.2 and all software are updated

i also have windows 7 on my laptop.

when i use windows7, i’m noticing that hot wind is blowing out from my laptop which helps to reduce the heat (this is confirm that there is not hardware issue)

and on opensuse 12.2 i’m noticing that wind is not blowing out and i dont know the reason… and i dont know how to diagnose that fan is properly working on this OS

Please anyone help me… otherwise my laptop will be fried :stuck_out_tongue:

Any help will be appreciated

thank you

The number one thing you need to do is to buy a couple of cans of compressed gas like Duster Spray. Next, turn off the laptop (do not hibernate) disconnect the laptop from your charger and remove the laptop battery. Now, using the compressed gas, blow air into every vent and you will be surprised on the amount of dust that can build up after just one year of use. You buy two cans because this stuff gets real cold and the pressure will drop. When that happens, just switch to the second can. Once no dust is coming out of the laptop vents when you blast in the compressed air, you are complete. Reinstall the laptop battery and connect back up to your charger and then turn on your laptop like normal. Next, you will want to read through the following blog. Its getting a little dated, but the kernel options still remain working mentioned in the article there.

GNU/Linux and openSUSE power management regressions - Blogs - openSUSE Forums

Next, did you know that all of the kernel drivers that control the fan and such live in the kernel you install? To get the latest drivers, you need the latest kernel, now up to 3.6.2 which works great in any openSUSE version. You can read the blog here:

S.A.K.C. - SUSE Automated Kernel Compiler - Version 2.78 - Blogs - openSUSE Forums

So I have placed a lot of info in front of you. Please read through the links and consider the advice before you take any further action and good luck to you.

Thank You,

First thing you should do is monitor your laptop temperature. In KDE you can install the temperature monitor widget, Gnome also has (or had) a system monitor that shows temperature.

Second, Windows may be activating the fan because it is using the CPU fully and constantly, thus increasing the heat and the need for cooling, while openSUSE is more behaved in this, i.e., doen’t have a lot of CPU-heavy processes running in the background. You can see the current CPU usage in KDE with the system load viewer widget (I always install it in the panel, near the notification area), by pressing CTRL+ESC and clicking the CPU % column title to sort by it. In Gnome I think the same monitor settings I mentioned above also show this. Of course, you can use

top

from the command line.

Also check your BIOS if you have a setting for “smartfan” or similar, and play with it - AFAIR I usually disable it.

Once I had a blocked fan (two years of accumulated dust) and I only noticed it when, using the laptop over my legs, not on a table, I started to sweat! So if your laptop is hotter than usual you certainly have a problem. If it worked in a previous version of openSUSE but not now, most probably it’s related to the kernel version - usually a newer one solves the problem, but sometimes there are regressions.

jdmcdaniel3 wrote:

> The number one thing you need to do is to buy a couple of cans of
> compressed gas like Duster Spray. Next, turn off the laptop (do not
> hibernate) disconnect the laptop from your charger and remove the laptop
> battery. Now, using the compressed gas, blow air into every vent and
> you will be surprised on the amount of dust that can build up after just
> one year of use. You buy two cans because this stuff gets real cold and
> the pressure will drop. When that happens, just switch to the second
> can. Once no dust is coming out of the laptop vents when you blast in
> the compressed air, you are complete. Reinstall the laptop battery and
> connect back up to your charger and then turn on your laptop like
> normal. Next, you will want to read through the following blog. Its
> getting a little dated, but the kernel options still remain working
> mentioned in the article there.

It’s a good idea to save enough of the air to blow the keyboard out as a
last step as well. It always amazes me just how much gunk accumulates under
the keys. Doesn’t do anything for cooling but it’s a good bit of pm to avoid
keyboard issues - as well as the aesthetics.


Will Honea

Hello, and I hope you do have solved your problems.
I am using the X201 and am experiencing a huge amount of shutdowns due to overheating since some time. This is due to several factors. The implementation of the lenovo fan system via ACPI seems to be partially problematic.
The BIOS on some machine seems to be faulty. And the (at the small machines like X201) tend to clutter with dust.
There is a thread of the bug on ACPI here Problem with Overheating then reboot since Ubuntu 11.10 - ThinkWiki and you can see that the problem is widespread.

If you are in emergency you can try like me the “trick” with setting the fan speed of the lenovo on “disengaged”. Runs like a hairdryer, I admitt, noisy, but does the trick.


su -

rmmod thinkpad_acpi

modprobe thinkpad_acpi fan_control=1

echo "level disengaged" > /proc/acpi/ibm/fan


It would be nice however if the problem would be solved. I will clean these days the machine, change also the thermal paste and then I will report back. If this does not resolve I will post another bug report.

Good luck.

If you want to know if you have this problem, look in /var/log/warn (goes like this:)


su -
cat /var/log/warn

This will show you a typical warning pattern:

 

kernel:     0.485848] CPU1: Core temperature above threshold, cpu clock throttled (total events = 1) 

kernel:     0.485856] CPU0: Core temperature above threshold, cpu clock throttled (total events = 1)



You will require a package called i8kutils for controlling Dell cooling fans on Inspirons and Latitudes.

**Description:**A set of tools for accessing the SMM BIOS on Dell laptops
User-space programs for accessing the SMM BIOS of Dell Inspiron and Latitude
laptops. The SMM BIOS is used on most DELL laptops to implement APM
functionalities and to access and monitor custom hardware, for example the
cooling fans, CPU temperature, etc.

Add this repository to Yast Software Repositories Index of /repositories/home:/msvec/openSUSE_12.2
Add a package called sensors from Packman to monitor the fan.

Follow this link for the rest of the instructions. http://askubuntu.com/questions/22049/how-to-control-fan-speed-in-dell-inspiron-5010-15r

[How to control fan speed in Dell Inspiron 5010 (15R)? - Ask Ubuntu

HOWTO: Install and configure i8kmon for configurable automatic fan speed control](http://askubuntu.com/questions/22049/how-to-control-fan-speed-in-dell-inspiron-5010-15r)http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=842775

On 2012-12-22 22:36, Romanator wrote:
>
> You will require a package called i8kutils for controlling Dell
> cooling fans on Inspirons and Latitudes.

Quick question: do you know if a similar app exists for compaqs?


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

You’ll need an application such as pwmconfig.

Installing the package sensors will allow you to create a configuration file for fan control.

<--------------------- snip --------------------------------------------------------------->

See also the lm_sensors homepage at:

lm-sensors

It uses a config file /etc/sysconfig/lm_sensors that contains the modules

to be loaded/unloaded. That file is sourced into this one.

The format of that file a shell script that simply defines the modules

in order as normal shell variables with the special names:

MODULE_1, MODULE_2, MODULE_3, etc.

CONFIG=/etc/sysconfig/lm_sensors
LOCK=/var/run/lm_sensors.lock
PSENSORS=/usr/bin/sensors
FANCONFIG=/etc/fancontrol
PFAN=/usr/sbin/fancontrol

Source function library.

. /etc/rc.status
<--------------------- snip --------------------------------------------------------------->
**fancontrol **- automated software based fan speed regulation

Introduction

fancontrol is a shellscript for use with lm_sensors. It reads its
configuration from a file, then calculates fan speeds from temperatures and
sets the corresponding pwm outputs to the computed values. It is included in
lm_sensors since version 2.8.0. For easy configuration, there’s a script
named pwmconfig which lets you interactively write your configuration file for
fancontrol. Alternatively you can write this file yourself using the
information from the configuration section of this document.

Please be careful when using the fan control features of your mainboard, in
addition to the risk of burning your CPU, at higher temperatures there will be
a higher wearout of your other hardware components, too. So if you plan to use
these components in 50 years, maybe you shouldn’t use fancontrol/your
hardware at all. Also please keep in mind most fans aren’t designed to be
powered by a PWMed voltage, for more detailed information on this I recommend
this appnote: http://www.maxim-ic.com/appnotes.cfm/appnote_number/707
In practice it doesn’t seem to be a major issue, the fans will get slightly
warmer, just be sure to have a temperature alarm and/or shutdown call, in case
some fan fails, because you probably won’t hear it anymore :wink:

The algorithm

fancontrol first reads its configuration, writes it to arrays and loops its
main function. This function gets the temperatures and fanspeeds from
kernel driver files and calculates new speeds depending on temperature
changes, but only if the temp is between MINTEMP and MAXTEMP. After that, the
new values are written to the pwm outputs. The pwm value increases
linearly with rising temperature.

See → https://build.opensuse.org/package/show?package=sensors&project=openSUSE%3A12.2](https://build.opensuse.org/package/show?package=sensors&project=openSUSE%3A12.2)
](https://build.opensuse.org/package/show?package=sensors&project=openSUSE%3A12.2)
There is a python file that should be compatible with most laptops. However, you’ll have to google to find it.

On 2012-12-22 23:16, Romanator wrote:
>
> robin_listas;2512755 Wrote:

>> Quick question: do you know if a similar app exists for compaqs?
>
> You’ll need an application such as pwmconfig.

Ah.
Apparently my laptop have none that can be adjusted:


/usr/sbin/pwmconfig: There are no pwm-capable sensor modules installed

Ok, thanks.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

I tried now and I opened my thinkpad. I fixed with a screwdriver the wheel of the ventilator and used highly compressed air to give a big blow, first outside, then from outside to inside and back again. I let time for condensation humidity to dry. In this first run, I did not remove the main-board and did not apply yet a new thermal paste However just by doing this trivial operation (thinkpad requires just the keyboard to be removed - 4 screws that’s all) I have a 20 % lower system temperature. I am convinced with a correct thermal paste of good to excellent quality I can lower further. Carlos, you may have a try with yours. What is important is to fix the vent during the operation (be it with a tooth stick) to avoid damage to the electronic and the vent. Cheers.

On 2012-12-23 19:06, stakanov wrote:
> Carlos, you may have a try with
> yours.

No, mine is fine. CPU is running at 35ºC, and something called
“acpitz-virtual-0” is running at 38. The underside part, far from the
fan, is worm, but it’s been that way since I bought it. I simply place
the laptop on 4 small wooden blocks to keep a generous airspace below
the thing. I want to buy one of those things to place the laptop on it,
with fans, but they run off the usb bus and that’s something I refuse to do.

I’m just curious to learn if the fan in mine can be controlled or not.
In the BIOS I can set it to auto or max or none (IIRC). In auto mode I
don’t know what controls it.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))

Carlos,

Have look at this ArchLinux link on Compaq. It appears that Compaq has no sensors but the CPU core temp sensors.

There are a couple of Bash scripts for monitoring temp and fan control. A cron job may have to be created.

Click here.

On 2012-12-27 20:36, Romanator wrote:
>
> Carlos,
>
> Have look at this ArchLinux link on Compaq. It appears that Compaq has
> no sensors but the CPU core temp sensors.
>
> There are a couple of Bash scripts for monitoring temp and fan control.
> A cron job may have to be created.
>
> Click ‘here’ (https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?pid=385118).

Curious. Thanks.

But mine is different, there are no fans under /proc/acpi, no thermal
zones either.

I have a Compaq presario CQ61-330SS, which at some time had a SMOLT
profile at
<http://www.smolts.org/client/show/pub_2c303e01-12a6-44f6-8128-f8df1d7ce080>,
but it has dissapeared.

The CPU temperature keeps low, and the fan is almost silent… so
whatever it is, it works.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4, with Evergreen, x86_64 “Celadon” (Minas Tirith))