/home warning of low disk space

on my TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 15 v4 with 2Tb SSD disk, 58Gb /home EXT3 partition, 32Gb RAM, I have the warning of low disk space but I didn’t copy anything in /home, I noted it appears when I’m copying some big files in 1.5 Tb /dati NTFS partition, may be not related but why this warning (set if space goes below 200Mb and dolphin bar shows about 187Mb)? how can I solve?
manythanks, ciao, Pier

You can see how full your file systems are with

df -h

If this warning shows up only when you’re copying a massively large file,
Then it depends on what app is doing the copying… Different apps copy or move differently to ensure data integrity and no loss.

So,
For instance a web browser copying/moving or downloading will store a temporary copy of the file in /var/tmp (or something like that) until the file is completely downloaded, then copy that file to its final location.

A torrent app will download files in pieces (chunks) and maintains a record of its progress in a temporary file typically located in the file’s temporary location, then moved along with the file to its final location.

A command line “cp” will behave differently depending on the file system(s), the copy might be streamed or the new copy might be stored temporarily somewhere before moving to the final location.

Also, your 200mb and 187mb are close enough that one might be calculated base2 and the other base10, so aren’t equivalent.

So, need more info unless the above is enough for you to sleuth the exact location where you have a shortage of space.

TSU

here is:

pla@pla4-TW:~> df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs         16G     0   16G   0% /dev
tmpfs            16G  342M   16G   3% /dev/shm
tmpfs            16G  9.7M   16G   1% /run
tmpfs            16G     0   16G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/sda9        59G   11G   45G  20% /
/dev/sda10       59G   55G  596M  99% /home
/dev/sda11      1.6T  576G  982G  37% /dati
tmpfs           3.2G   16K  3.2G   1% /run/user/1000
pla@pla4-TW:~> 

so seems that really is a shortage of space.
but I didn’t copied anything to /home, how can I check where is all this amount of Gb in my /home?
as tsu2 says may be some temporary file that I don’t find

“Filelight” (KDE application) https://software.opensuse.org/package/filelight will give you a graphical representation of disk usage.

Or from your home directory use “du -h” to show your directory and subdirectory usage.

My favourite tool for this sort of thing is KDE Konqueror – point it to your home directory and choose the view “File size”.
Another method could be to use something like this: “find . -type f -size +100M -ls”
Alternatively, you can use, for each directory in your home directory, something like “du -ha .local/ | sort -r | less” but, that’s rather tedious and not really failure free …

As others indicate there is not an obvious solution. It is more hard work and intelligent guessing based on the knowledge you have about how large things should be.

I mostly first go to the root of the file sytem, in this case /home:

cd /home
du -h *

That will give you the list with size of what is there. Then cd to the one that seems to be too large and repeat the du -h *. Going down until you say: hey, what is that!

I admit that in this case, as soon as you reach your home directory, you will have a long list. In that case

du -h * | grep more

will present it page by page so that you can write down the suspects.

maaaanythanks guys lol! combining all your suggestions I found the culprit, it was /hone/pla/.recoll/ inside it there was a folder related to db veeery big, I deleted and everything sems to be normal now, the culprit seems not to be the transfer of big files, it was probably not related :slight_smile:

Nice you found it. Yes, systematicaly working often helps.

Or, “less” – “more or less … ” :wink:

As so often in Unix/Linux there are more ways to achive things and everybody has her/his personal favourites.

…such as ncdu, rapid navigation and directory/file sizes together, lets you find the monsters quickly.