Help mounting camera

What about using camera software like digikam?

I initially queried this. He wants to stay with CLI tools - specifically via a script that can download the photos to a particular directory. I was hoping that gphoto2 might do this job for him (with libgphoto2 support) since the usb-storage driver does not appear to work for him. I’ve been lucky - all the camera’s I’ve attached via USB, appear as storage devices, without any camera mode selection required. :slight_smile:

Two options. Pick the one of your choice.

  1. I’m stupid.
  2. I want to automate the process with a bash script for a naive user.

I am going to give it a try as soon as I exhaust the possibility of finding an online English manual for an Ixus 105. No luck so far.

It’s just that “cp -R /media/camera/DCIM/* mydirectory” is SO MUCH simpler and more elegant than fiddling with a piece of software that I have never used. Isn’t that always true in computing? The tool you know is usually the best solution.

Thanks for all the assistance.

On 2010-12-15 22:36, deano ferrari wrote:
>
>> What about using camera software like digikam?
>
> I initially queried this. He wants to stay with CLI tools -
> specifically via a script that can download the photos to a particular
> directory. I was hoping that gphoto2 might do this job for him (with
> libgphoto2 support) since the usb-storage driver does not appear to work
> for him. I’ve been lucky - all the camera’s I’ve attached via USB,
> appear as storage devices, without any camera mode selection required.
> :slight_smile:

Yes, I wrote such a script to download photos from a cellular phone, but I
had to use a CLI command, “gnokii” that already existed. I don’t know if a
similar program exists for pulling photos from cameras. That would be what
he has to investigate.

Candidates to look at (I used webpin to search for “photo”:

  • photorec: File-Recovery tool
  • 6.11 [packman | graphics]
  • 6.9 [suse-oss]
  • gphoto: A Digital Camera Utility
  • 2.4.7 [suse-oss]
  • 2.4.8 [graphics | GPhoto]
  • gphotofs: User Level File System for gphoto-Based Cameras
  • 0.4.0 [suse-oss | GPhoto | filesystems]
  • libgphoto2-x86: A Digital Camera Library
  • 2.4.9 [filesystems]


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

On 2010-12-15 23:06, ionmich wrote:
>
> robin_listas;2266378 Wrote:

>> If you are using KDE, why do you want to do it via CLI?

> Two options. Pick the one of your choice.

It helps us to understand your problem and try to give appropiate answers.

>
> 1. I’m stupid.

I doubt it :stuck_out_tongue:

> 2. I want to automate the process with a bash script for a naive user.

That’s a good reason.

I would try first to get kde something (or gnome something) to recognize
the camera. Then try to see if you can script something out of that.

If the graphical tools, which are probable where the development goes,
don’t see the camera, there is little chance of doing it some other way. Or
harder.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

I got the camera menu to display in English but could not locate any options that dealt with USB or transfers.

I don’t own a digital camera (besides the cellular phone), but with a
friend’s camera I had that problem; the solution was to extract the card
from the camera and plug it into a reader.

That is definitely a solution that works, but still far from an automated method via a script. That’s my ultimate goal.

Thanks for the suggestions.

On 2010-12-16 01:36, ionmich wrote:

>> don’t own a digital camera (besides the cellular phone), but with a
>> friend’s camera I had that problem; the solution was to extract the
>> card from the camera and plug it into a reader.
>
> That is definitely a solution that works, but still far from an
> automated method via a script. That’s my ultimate goal.

If placing the card on a reader works, then you can certainly automate the
process with a script. That is, if you get a mountable filesystem.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.2 x86_64 “Emerald” at Telcontar)

Just an addendum. I’ve found that on one particular camera, the Nikon L14, and very likely others, the FAT16 filesystem created by the camera cannot be mounted by Linux (both openSUSE and Ubuntu tried). It seems that the partition starts on a misaligned sector. A check with fdisk showed that it started on sector 207 and fdisk went into “DOS compatibility mode” with a hint to disable it. However the filesystem could be read and copied by Windows. When I redid the partition table with fdisk, it started on sector 2048. So it seems Linux cannot mount some legacy formats.

This isn’t a problem for me, as I normally use PTP mode, as all modern cameras support this. Today I was just checking that what I had on the media matched what I had downloaded via the USB cable over the year.

I suppose you could format the card first under Linux before feeding it to the camera.

So this is a tip that you should use PTP mode and tools like libgphoto2, and deprecate USB storage mode, like manufacturers intend you to these days. There is no guarantee that the filesystems used by the camera are mountable by Linux. I mean, someday a manufacturer may decide to implement a non-DOS filesystem on internal camera memory (a recent model on the market comes with 1GB built-in, saving the user having to get a starter SD card) and it’s all invisible to the user with PTP. Besides PTP offer more features, such as being able to remotely control the camera.

So sometimes you have to give up what you are “familiar with”, because it’s out of date.

There was another issue to do with udev rules and permissions in 11.3 which is another story.

Interesting findings re card formatting.

So this is a tip that you should use PTP mode and tools like libgphoto2, and deprecate USB storage mode, like manufacturers intend you to these days.

Thats good advice too. I tried to gently encourage the OP to use the PTP/gphoto2 approach previously. (It may be the only option available with some cameras).

A friend who makes his living locally servicing WinDoze systems had a similar problem with one of his customers and a similar Canon model (bought in Mexico). He asked to borrow my camera (bought in Sweden) for testing. He was unable to mount or read either one under three versions of WinDoze. His opinion is the Canon firmware deliberately fiddles with the file system to force use of their proprietary transfer software.

My findings as reported by my previous post…“Because if I remove the memory, plug it into my Vivitar camera and plug that into the USB slot it mounts as a vfat file system as I would expect.”… would appear to confirm his opinion.

So sometimes you have to give up what you are “familiar with”, because it’s out of date.

The problem as I see it is that I am out of date. For example in the world of recorded music I have had to change my collection from 78 rpm records to 33-1/3 rpm or 45 rpm. Then I changed to 8 track tape, then to 1/4 inch reel to reel, then to 1/8 inch Phillips cassette, then to L-cassette, then to CD. I think several executives of the R.I.A.A. have retired on my contributions to their industry. I’d rather not provide similar sustenance to Canon executives.

Solution : I ordered a card reader.

Thanks for all the assistance.

Those are really handy nowadays. Hopefully a lot of laptops these days got them built in :slight_smile:

Best regards,
Greg