having root access in terminal

Hi,

I am brand new to linux, and I’ve been trying to copy an executable file into my /usr/local/bin folder in root. Everytime I try though, I get “Access denied.” How do I bypass this?

There are many ways. You do need to be careful when using root permissions.

One way is to open a file manager with root permissions. For example, in openSUSE-10.3 with kde-3.5.7 you could type:kdesu konquerorand enter root password when prompted, and that would open konqueror with root permissions. Then simply drag and drop.

One can do something similar in gnome, but instead of using “kdesu”, you would use “gnomesu”.

Also in openSUSE-10.3 one can with KDE-3.5.7 go to Kmenu > System > FileManager > File Manger - Super User Mode
and enter root password when prompted, and then in the file manager that is opened in super-user mode, simply drag and drop.

Another way, for both gnome and kde, is to open a gnome-terminal or konsole and type
su -c ‘cp /path/to-the-file/binaryfile /usr/local/bin/.’
where “binaryfile” is the executeable file you wish to copy to /usr/local/bin and “path/to-the-file” is the path to the binary file.

Thanks much. It worked.

Is there a way to just have permission in terminal to access folders and run binaries? (im running openSUSE11 on KDE4)

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

You could be ‘root’ all the time, but it’s a bad practice in any
computer to run with more privileges than you need. Do your really plan
on copying files all over your system so often it’s a big deal? Chances
are you don’t need to do that. For applications you want to run you can
put a binary in the ‘bin’ directory in your home directory. Also most
of the executables on your system that are in the system locations (like
/usr/local/bin) are executable by anybody and not just ‘root’. Having
the ability to modify your entire system all of the time leads to
problems caused by accidents, viruses, other malware, or evil people who
sneak into your computer when you run to get a drink from the water
fountain. If you don’t need ‘root’ privileges, don’t use them. This is
a major contributing factor to the insecurity inherent in windows…
every script, app, or popup that shows up in an obscure program called a
‘web browser’, when executed, can take over your entire system. Without
these privileges it might be able to affect your own user’s
preferences/settings, but who cares? At least you’re not rebuilding
your entire system, affecting other users on your system, and providing
access to intercept everything your computer does including every
password, cryptographic cipher, secure connection to the bank, etc.

Good luck.

pd atrick wrote:
> oldcpu;1878983 Wrote:
>> There are many ways. You do need to be careful when using root
>> permissions.
>>
>> One way is to open a file manager with root permissions. For example,
>> in openSUSE-10.3 with kde-3.5.7 you could type:::kdesu
>> konqueror::and enter root password when prompted, and that
>> would open konqueror with root permissions. Then simply drag and drop.
>>
>> One can do something similar in gnome, but instead of using “kdesu”,
>> you would use “gnomesu”.
>>
>> Also in openSUSE-10.3 one can with KDE-3.5.7 go to Kmenu > System >
>> FileManager > File Manger - Super User Mode
>> and enter root password when prompted, and then in the file manager
>> that is opened in super-user mode, simply drag and drop.
>>
>> Another way, for both gnome and kde, is to open a gnome-terminal or
>> konsole and type
>> ::su -c ‘cp /path/to-the-file/binaryfile /usr/local/bin/.’
>> ::where “binaryfile” is the executeable file you wish to copy
>> to /usr/local/bin and “path/to-the-file” is the path to the binary file.
>
>
> Thanks much. It worked.
>
> Is there a way to just have permission in terminal to access folders
> and run binaries? (im running openSUSE11 on KDE4)
>
>
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.2 (GNU/Linux)
Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org

iD8DBQFI5o5e3s42bA80+9kRAi4PAKCG0MjpVlRez4xO+z2U8N6+74IH8ACaAy2G
prbNKixOF7IcD+awLh081gw=
=N/rU
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

Have a look at this: SDB:Login as root - openSUSE
Hope it helps to get the some feeling about this important subject.