Has Open Computing Won?

Interesting commentary.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04544v5

I don’t know,
Did MS Windows “win” 15 years ago (when it had over 95% of all Desktops while also selling a large number of PC Servers after the crash that spelled the end of Sun)?

Actually, nowadays you can still see a large number of open, closed and hybrid combinations.
True diversity at its best, and each model continues to exist for what each provides.

TSU

In opensuse.org.no-support.soapbox, cygnuslodge wrote:
> Interesting commentary.

Interesting indeed. The discussion is a little confused since Linux is a kernel not an operating system. Some people
(Torvalds’ included) may scoff at distinction between GNU/Linux and Linux but when Android, which is 100% Linux and 0%
GNU, enters the debate the need for such a distinction is obvious.

On Wed, 07 Sep 2016 11:56:15 +0000, flymail wrote:

> In opensuse.org.no-support.soapbox, cygnuslodge wrote:
>> Interesting commentary.
>
> Interesting indeed. The discussion is a little confused since Linux is a
> kernel not an operating system. Some people (Torvalds’ included) may
> scoff at distinction between GNU/Linux and Linux but when Android, which
> is 100% Linux and 0%
> GNU, enters the debate the need for such a distinction is obvious.

There are some who identify Android as a fork of Linux rather than 100%
Linux, because it includes some proprietary bits.


Jim Henderson
openSUSE Forums Administrator
Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

Open source computer has always been a winner for me. So who cares what BBC or the rest of the world thinks.

My sentiments as well. :slight_smile:

Yes, indeed. Others can like what they want to like, I like open source and still – so far – openSUSE.:slight_smile:

On 2016-09-07, Jim Henderson <hendersj@no-mx.forums.microfocus.com> wrote:
> There are some who identify Android as a fork of Linux rather than 100%
> Linux, because it includes some proprietary bits.

I agree some might. But then I would ask those people whether Linux Mint is a fork of GNU/Linux because it contains some
proprietary bits. I suspect RMS will have an opinion on this matter which might not be the same as that of LBT.

But this misses my point concerning the failure of this BBC report to distinguish between the Linux kernel and GNU/Linux
operating system which IMO is very relevant.

Democracy rule #1: Do not tolerate monopolies!
[HR][/HR]Problem: If the Redmond folks leave the stage then, we’ll have a monopoly – a *NIX monopoly (which is what AT&T Bell Labs wanted anyway . . . :wink: )
[HR][/HR]Looking at computing history, it began with a monopoly (IBM), which was destroyed by micro-computers – between the early 1960’s and up to about the 1990’s we had a plethora of operating systems. If Microsoft is killed off, guess what – we’ll have a monopoly again . . .