Hardware sensors in 11.4 more accurate than 11.3?

Are the Hardware sensor more accurate in 11.4 than 11.3? My CPU temps have gone up 4C since I upgraded. Or is this not as accurate?

On 09/29/2011 04:56 AM, FlameBait wrote:
>
> Are the Hardware sensor more accurate in 11.4 than 11.3? My CPU temps
> have gone up 4C since I upgraded. Or is this not as accurate?

a whole four degrees?? :wink:

i guess more likely you have some marginally more taxing applications or
desktop environment (turn off desktop effects and see if it cools
down–maybe you need a proprietary video driver?)…or maybe you now
have slightly less aggressive power savings settings…

oh! wait i think i remember discussions in some thread(s) here about a
power savings regression in 11.4’s kernel compared to the kernel in 11.3

ah, read here
<http://forums.opensuse.org/english/other-forums/community-fun/general-chit-chat/459062-possible-power-management-regressions-recent-linux-kernels.html>

sorry, i didn’t read it again, it may not apply to you…in any event i
wouldn’t sweat the tiny increase in your power bill…but it is you
pocketbook…


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

There are power regressions between the 2.6.34 and the 2.6.37 kernel, which may contribute to this observation. Unfortunately there is a trend that the newer the kernel, the more the power consumption. And the more the power consumption, likely the warmer the CPU. Unfortunately the current trend is the newer the kernel, the more power is consumed. Phoronix has MANY articles on this subject.

Not worried about the power consumed but the heat produced more or less. I have to remove that from the area and that does cost somewhat more. I have a 6 core running full out at 3.2 GHz with “cool and quiet” turned off in BIOS for my SDR computer and it’s actually running cooler than this 4 core. The 6 core runs around 34c to 35c with the stock CPU cooler and this 4 core is running 42c to 43c and higher with the stock CPU cooler. I keep them clean so it’s not junk clogging them up. I came in this afternoon and some process had it up to 49c running several cores pretty hard. It doesn’t slag until 60c so I am not too worried. When I managed to force it to run 100% on all four cores to check for thermal issues it only got up to 54c. I may have to look into a aftermarket CPU cooler as it’s the stock one that came with the CPU and the increased efficiency in an after market one might keep it cooler and this room cooler as the over all effect.

I don’t have to run any heat back here during the winter but during the rest of the year I have to pull the heat out. I have it set to cycle the AC at 29c. During June July and August the AC runs a lot I really can’t use outside air until it gets about 22c outside any higher and it can’t keep up with the heat produced in here.

On 09/29/2011 09:06 AM, FlameBait wrote:
>
> I may have to look into a aftermarket CPU
> cooler as it’s the stock one that came with the CPU and the increased
> efficiency in an after market one might keep it cooler and this room
> cooler as the over all effect.

no, the heat produced will be the same with the aftermarket cpu cooler
or the OEM cooler…just the aftermarket will move the heat to the
room faster and more completely thereby showing a decrease at the cpu,
but the heat load in the room will stay the same…

and, by the way in this discussion cpu heat generated, power
consumption, electricity cost and total heat load are all linked…one
goes down, they all go down…

now, if you buy one of those water cooled cpu coolers, and put the
condensing coil outside that would cool the room…


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

I may have to tweak for power saving over performance then see it I can attack it that way with out too much loss in responsiveness . I usually had the system set for performance in the past. I have the Nvidia drivers installed so I don’t think it’s drivers.

On the 99 to 105 degree days which we have a lot of June through September the outside coil wouldn’t be much help.

From what I know of thermodynamics, they tend to be the same.

Seems the KDE Desktop environment is just making the CPU work harder than it did in the version 11.3 ran too. The top CPU consuming processes most of the time are Kwin, /user/binXorg and Plasma desktop. I like my transparent panel so I am not turning off desktop effects. Cutting down the number of Desktops impacted the temp very little. The CPU is running six degrees Celsius warmer today then when I was under 11.3. Not much you can do about the Kernel. With four copies of glxgears running and 100% of each CPU core being used I was at 55 C that’s 5 C cooler than the 60 C max this CPU can safely operate under and not much different than under 11.3.

Could getting a new Video card impact this any? It doesn’t seem so as it doesn’t look like anything is of loaded to the GPU as far as desktop effects go. This is a Nvidia 8500 on this machine so it’s not current by any means.

oldcpu could adding

pcie_aspm=force

to menu.lst help this issue of increased CPU temp in a desktop environment by influencing the general power management of the CPU?

It might help. It might not. It is worth an attempt.

Also, typically the proprietary graphic drivers (for AMD and nVidia) have far superior power management (and hence significantly less heat dissipation) than the open source drivers. Another thing to note is users with PCs with two graphic devices (ie one on motherboard and one in a PCIe slot) will typically see temperature increases as a result of the extra power consumed.

I noted some of the kernel regressions in power management (which will have a direct impact on heat dissipation (or lack there of)) here: GNU/Linux and openSUSE power management regressions - Blogs - openSUSE Forums

Wrt power management/heat-dissipation, I recommend you start a new thread with the thread title including words such as ‘how to improve heat-dissipation/power management?’ We have some users who have spent a fair amount of time investigating this (far far far more than I) who may have suggestions.

I am going to try that first before I start a new thread and see how it plays over a day or so. after I get done with my walk.
Now I am back on my treadmill for another 35 minutes. :smiley:

On 09/29/2011 10:26 AM, FlameBait wrote:
>
> On the 99 to 105 degree days which we have a lot of June through
> September the outside coil wouldn’t be much help.

you need to move! :wink:

but, 105F is still a good ways below 60C and most CPUs can hit that when
working, no problem…

i have a friend working for a big name in the search space, he said that
mean outside air temp is considered when selecting sites for new server
farm construction…because using ‘free’ cooling is really cool on the
bottom line.


DD
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

The AMD Phenoms shut down at 60 C. I am running 40 to 49 C here now. Installing the power management in YAST didn’t seem to do much.

It’s 81 F/ 27.2 C in here right now it’s 79 F/ 26.1 C outside today it cooled down quite a bit on October first.

On 2011-10-02 23:46, FlameBait wrote:
>
> The AMD Phenoms shut down at 60 C. I am running 40 to 49 C here now.

Too sensitive for my liking, no good in hot weather.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

The DE and kernel shouldn’t tax the CPU so much that heat is an issue.

On 10/03/2011 02:16 AM, FlameBait wrote:
>
> The DE and kernel shouldn’t tax the CPU so much that heat is an issue.

  1. use a less demanding DE, give LXDE or Xfce or something else a try

  2. and set it to be less demanding…like:

it takes less calculations to draw square corners rather than rounded one…

less for a ‘plain’ flat looking top (instead of rounded looking with 3D
shading

a solid color background takes less ticks than flowers and bees and
whatever…

and of course, desktop effects off takes less computing than on…

  1. turn off all unneeded services (do you need cups, joystick, smb,
    smpppd, sshd or others? of course, if you need them you leave them on)

  2. don’t use stuff you don’t need (like maybe desktop indexing)

  3. use less demanding applications (Opera needs less than firefox, Claws
    less than Thunderbird, etc)

  4. that better working CPU cooler WILL keep the CPU working longer, but
    will not decrease the room temp (do that with more airconditioning or
    other mechanical means to move heat outside…)


DD
Caveat-Hardware-Software-
openSUSE®, the “German Automobiles” of operating systems

Denver none of that should be necessary. It wasn’t necessary in 11.3 and I have the same operating environment more or less. Unless you want to tell my my CPU temps jumped 8 C to 10 C because it’s my fault. I am not buying that. Power regressions have been noted in the Kernel used in 11.3 Power Management in YAST isn’t so good. Power Management in KDE 4.6.00 doesn’t work I have been informed. I am not running a 3D cube here just the default KDE 4.6.00 install on openSUSE 11.4 with the Nvidia modules. Sorry I am not changing DE I came to openSUSE for KDE not some other DE. Other solutions have been noted but the bottom line is 11.4 runs much hotter than 11.3 on the very same hardware at my place.

Hi
Haven’t noticed any changes in CPU, motherboad or HDD temperatures on
11.4 Gnome/Gnome 3.0. All run around 30-36C, 4400+ X2 cpu has been water
cooled for three or more years now… been the same for SLED as well.


Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
openSUSE 11.4 (x86_64) Kernel 2.6.37.6-0.7-desktop
up 7 days 6:23, 6 users, load average: 0.23, 0.27, 0.26
GPU GeForce 8600 GTS Silent - Driver Version: 280.13

On 2011-10-03 20:27, DenverD wrote:
> 3. turn off all unneeded services (do you need cups, joystick, smb,
> smpppd, sshd or others? of course, if you need them you leave them on)

Most of those do not use cpu at all. Just fire up top or equivalent, and
see how much down in the list they appear. And if they are way up, is that
you are actually using them.

A well designed daemon in repose is waiting for input, and the operating
system will have them sleeping.

What they use is memory.


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)

On 2011-10-03 21:06, FlameBait wrote:

> Other solutions have been noted but the bottom line
> is 11.4 runs much hotter than 11.3 on the very same hardware at my
> place.

If the excess temperature is acceptable, just wait till they correct the
regression. If it is not acceptable, reduce power usage by, for example,
reducing some bloat.

Although the video effects should load the video card, not the system CPU -
if things are correctly designed and working correctly. And Linux is at a
disadvantage there (proprietary drivers and all that).


Cheers / Saludos,

Carlos E. R.
(from 11.4 x86_64 “Celadon” at Telcontar)